Thanksgiving Pie

Let's be honest, Thanksgiving is all about pie. No matter how much you stuff yourself during dinner, it's tough to turn down a slice. Forget about waxy store-bought pies, though—this is the time to go homemade, which is easier than it might sound. We'll walk you through making the dough and filling and help with any troubleshooting that comes up along the way.

Let's be honest, Thanksgiving is all about pie. No matter how much you stuff yourself during dinner, it's tough to turn down a slice. Forget about waxy store-bought pies, though—this is the time to go homemade, which is easier than it might sound. We'll walk you through making the dough and filling and help with any troubleshooting that comes up along the way.

Pie Dough

Build the Perfect Crust
"The best pie dough" really means "the best pie dough for you." No matter what magazines and websites (including us, from time to time) would have you believe, recipes are not one-size-fits-all, and, in this case, which recipe you choose largely comes down to what kind of baker you are, how much experience you have baking, and what kind of results you prefer. Once you've picked your crust, you can check out our simple tutorials on building a lattice top, blind-baking, and more.
Pick the right pie dough recipe for you

Pie Dough Recipes

Sweet Potato Pie

Silky, Sweet, and Utterly Classic
Most recipes for sweet potato pie start with canned condensed milk, but we prefer to simmer the potatoes in milk and cream until the mixture reduces down into a sort of DIY condensed milk. Pair the mixture with our flaky pie dough, which is able to stand up to the custard no problem.
Get the recipe for Silky Sweet Potato Pie

Pecan Pie

Rich, Butterscotch-y, and Super Simple
Rich, butterscotch-y pecan pie is actually one of the simplest pies around—the filling is made in one bowl with corn syrup, honey, brown sugar, and vanilla. The hardest part is arranging the pecans on top, and even that's a breeze.
Get the recipe for Classic Pecan Pie

Pecan Pie Recipes

Pumpkin Pie

(It's Actually Butternut Squash Pie)
You may not realize that the pumpkin purée that comes out of a can actually isn't pumpkin, but squash. With that in mind, Stella set out to make the pumpkin pie to rule them all, and all it takes is some roasted butternut squash purée and homemade sweetened condensed milk. While it's a bit more effort than a pumpkin pie made with squash out of a can (if that's more your speed, we have a great recipe below), it's easy to make a couple of the components ahead of time, and the pie itself keeps very well for a couple days.
Get the recipe for Butternut "Pumpin" Pie

Pumpkin Pie Recipes

Apple Pie

Old-Fashioned, Fall-Forward
This recipe is the classic, simple, nostalgia-inducing apple pie. It's so easy, you can actually make the filling entirely in a plastic bag. All you have to do is macerate the apples in brown sugar and spices for a few hours, then pour the mixture into a pie crust, and bake. We recommend a double crust and plenty of vanilla ice cream alongside.
Get the recipe for Old-Fashioned Apple Pie

Apple Pie Recipes

Pie FAQS

Can I make pie dough ahead of time and freeze it?
Yes, all pie dough can be frozen. If you want to make the dough in advance, roll and shape it right away, then wrap up the fully formed shell and/or a rolled sheet of dough (for the top crust of a fruit pie, for instance). These can be frozen for several months, then thawed to 40°F (4°C) in the fridge before use or refrigerated up to a day in advance.
Can whole pies be frozen in advance?
Broadly speaking, in fruit pies that are baked until bubbling hot, the raw filling can be frozen; in most cases, it is more advantageous to freeze the filling in a pie shell and thaw and bake as directed. Read more about how to freeze and defrost fruitpies here. Prepared custard fillings, however, should never be frozen.
Can pie be left out overnight?
In general, any pie topped with meringue or whipped cream should be refrigerated, while those made without tend to keep well at a cool room temperature.
Will pie filling thicken as it cools?
Yes, all pie fillings will thicken as they cool.
Will pie crust get soggy?
All pie crusts will soften over time, as moisture from the filling slowly migrates to the crust, causing it to soften. The rate at which this will happen depends entirely on the fat and moisture content of the crust itself as well as the sugar and water content of the filling. Luckily, you can combat soggy pie crusts by keeping them on a layer of oven-dried Epsom salt. Unfortunately, outright sogginess, or a sense of squishy wetness, is generally sign of a larger problem, such as an underbaked crust or filling (or both).
What kind of pies require blind-baking?
As a very general rule, double-crusted or latticed pies are not blind-baked, as they require you to fold the top and bottom crusts together to form a seal. Typically, they're also baked for longer, to allow both crusts to set and crisp. Single-crust pies are usually blind-baked, the reason being that with completely exposed fillings, it's difficult to bake them long enough to set the bottom crust without negatively impacting the texture and appearance of the filling. But honestly, the best advice we can give here is to follow the recipes! They should always specify if the crust is to be blind-baked or not. And don't forget to check out our essential tips for blind-baking before you get started.
Are pie weights necessary?
Pie dough should always be weighted when you're blind-baking, but pie weights are a waste of money. Instead, we recommend covering the dough with a sheet of aluminum foil and filling it with sugar. Bonus: you'll end up with a sweet batch of quick-toasted sugar. Read more about how to blind-bake pie here.
Any suggestions for Thanksgiving desserts that can be made way ahead of time (2+ days)?
Pretty much any pie can be made ahead! Store it in the fridge, then serve at room temperature—or, if you like, crisp it up in a warm oven for half an hour before serving.
My crust shrank! What happened?
When pie crusts shrink, it's generally because the dough wasn't allowed to rest for long enough, or the flour you used was too "strong," meaning its protein content was higher than recommended for our recipes.