Sous Vide Barbecue Pork Ribs Recipe

Pork ribs with a crusty bark or rich glaze of sauce and a texture that's tender yet meaty—and you don't need a smoker to get them.

A photo of a pile of Sous Vide Barbecue Pork Ribs on a cutting board
Whether you want to call them barbecue or not, these sous vide pork ribs are smoky, tender, and delicious. J. Kenji López-Alt

Why It Works

  • Sous vide techniques provide optimal control for dialed-in texture and flavor.
  • A balanced spice rub with a touch of liquid smoke produces plenty of smoke flavor in the meat, with no need for an actual smoker.
  • Optional Prague Powder produces a nice pink "smoke" ring.

For most people who live outside of the southern US, the opportunities to taste excellent, smoky, low-and-slow Southern-style barbecue pork ribs are few and far between. You may be lucky enough to have a backyard and a smoker or Kettle grill, but even then, nailing that perfect temperature time after time can be a tricky affair that takes years of practice to get right. Enter sous vide.

With a vacuum sealer and a precision cooker in your kitchen, you're guaranteed perfect results every time. I'm talking pork ribs with a crusty bark or rich glaze of sauce and a texture that's tender yet meaty. Ribs that don't fall off the bone—any barbecue lover will tell you that ribs that fall off the bone are overcooked—but that release with just a gentle tug of the teeth.

What We're After

When you cook barbecue ribs in a smoker, a number of things are going on.

  • First, slow, gentle heat in a smoker allows the ribs' copious connective tissue to convert into gelatin, turning the tough ribs tender.
  • Second, the exterior of the ribs dehydrates and browns via the Maillard reaction, a series of chemical processes that give browned meats their complex flavor. This is what creates the pleasant, crisp bark on the outside of a good rib.
  • Third, the meat becomes more and more flavorful as smoky compounds from the wood and coal are lifted into the air via water vapor. That water vapor then condenses on the surface of the meat and re-evaporates, leaving smoky flavors behind.
  • Fourth, the ribs develop a "smoke ring," a ring of pink just below the surface of the meat, caused by the interaction of its red pigment with nitric oxide or carbon monoxide from the grill.

So, in order to get great ribs from our sous vide cooker, we need to address all of these issues.

Getting a Tender, Meaty Interior Using Sous Vide

Chart showing pork ribs that have been cooked sous vide for various lengths of time at various temperatures
Pork ribs cooked sous vide to various temperatures, for various lengths of time.

J. Kenji López-Alt

Turning tough meat tender requires two things: heat energy and time. When meat is held at a temperature of around 130°F (54°C) and up, tough connective tissue will break down into gelatin. The rate at which this conversion takes place is a function of temperature; the lower the temperature, the longer it takes. At the same time, the lower the temperature, the more internal moisture the ribs will retain as they cook. To determine the optimal temperature and timing range, I cooked several dozen ribs at temperatures ranging from 130°F all the way up to 180°F (82°C).

At the lower end of the spectrum, the meat takes far too long to tenderize—up to three days or more, and even then, the meat comes out more mushy and soft than tender and meaty. Too hot, and the meat falls apart in shreds, tasting more boiled than barbecued. The middle, between 145 and 165°F (63 and 74°C), was the sweet spot, and, to be honest, there were quite a few temperature and timing combinations from that range that I enjoyed. Here are my two favorites:

Extra Meaty Ribs: 145°F (63°C) for 36 Hours

Photo of a pork rib cooked sous vide at 145°F for 36 hours
A pork rib cooked low and slow (145°F for 36 hours) using sous vide has an extra meaty and tender texture.

J. Kenji López-Alt

At this low temperature, ribs retain plenty of moisture as they tenderize. The result is an extra-meaty rib that has the texture of a moist pork chop, but is still tender to the tooth. It pulls away from the bones nicely with just a little tug. I've never gotten meat with this texture using more traditional means of cooking, so if you really want to see what sous vide can do, this is the way to go.

Traditional Barbecue–Style Ribs: 165°F (74°C) for 12 Hours

A photo of a pork rib cooked sous vide at 165°F for 12 hours
For a traditional barbecue texture, use sous vide to cook the pork ribs relatively hot and fast — 165°F for 12 hours.

J. Kenji López-Alt

At 165°F (74°C), you end up with meat that's a little more loose and shreds more easily, though it's by no means dry. This is meat that pulls off the bone and almost melts on your tongue, washing it with porky flavor and leaving behind shreds with a more significant chew. The texture is very much like that of traditional barbecue, though a little bit moister.

You can extrapolate from these two temperatures and timings to figure out what other combinations in between will yield. Cooking at 152°F (67°C) for 24 hours was a close runner-up, resulting in a texture that's a little more tender than the 145°F ribs, but a little juicier than the 165°F ones.

So, while ribs cooked at 145°F will take about three times as long to tenderize as ribs cooked at 165°F, they'll end up with a meatier, more succulent texture that eats almost like an extra-tender steak. Ribs cooked at a higher temperature will have a more traditional barbecue rib texture, with well-rendered fat and meat that shreds as you eat it.

For Extra-Juicy Sous Vide Pork Ribs, Turn to Salt!

With temperature and timing addressed, I turned to the next question: the rub. I mixed together a basic spice rub using our guide to spice rubs as a template, adjusting the flavors until I got something I was happy with. I ended up with a combination of paprika, mustard seed, black pepper, garlic powder, dried oregano, coriander seed, and red pepper flakes, along with brown sugar for sweetness.

A couple of questions came up immediately. Some sous vide recipes recommend against adding spice rubs to the bag as the meat cooks, because they can alter the flavor in a negative way. I have never found this to be the case, whether I'm cooking a steak, vegetables, or ribs. Spice rubs work just fine in sous vide bags.

The other, more important question was that of salt. Specifically, when and how much to add. Salt can have a profound effect on the texture and flavor of meat proteins. As salt sits in contact with meat, it will dissolve some muscle proteins, which in turn helps the meat retain moisture better. That's the reason a ham has that particular juicy and tender texture—which is great in ham, but not always desirable in barbecue. I tried cooking a few different sets of ribs side by side.

A photo of an unsalted pork rib cooked sous vide
Unsalted ribs are dry and not particularly well-seasoned.

J. Kenji López-Alt

The first batch I left completely unsalted, rubbing the ribs with the salt-free rub, cooking them, then adding salt only to taste at the very end. These ribs came out tender, but relatively dry, and they also weren't particularly well seasoned on the inside. The ribs I rubbed with a mixture that included salt, on the other hand, came out far juicier in the end. Juicy enough that you could immediately see the difference with your naked eye before even biting into them.

A photo of a salted pork rib cooked sous vide
Salted ribs stay much juicier, but can end up with a slightly ham-like texture.

J. Kenji López-Alt

I also tried salting the ribs by soaking them in a brine solution for a few hours before rubbing, bagging, and cooking them. The ribs that were brined in salt water ended up with the same problems I find in almost all brined products: They are juicier, but that juice is watery. The ribs end up tasting more wet than juicy and meaty. Regular salting is the way to go.

As for timing, even salting immediately prior to bagging and cooking is okay, but I got the best results out of ribs that were salted and bagged a day in advance and allowed to rest overnight in the refrigerator before cooking the next day. Any longer than a day in the fridge, and they start to take on a much hammier texture.

Liquid Smoke Is Real Smoke!

Now we get to the real question: How do you get smoky flavor into ribs without actual smoke? Some sous vide recipes use a hybrid method, either starting or finishing the ribs in the smoker to add real smoke flavor to them. To me, this seems to miss the point. If I'm willing to fire up the smoker, then there are any number of traditional recipes out there that don't necessarily require sous vide for great results. I want a method that allows me to cook the ribs indoors from start to finish, no actual fire necessary.

A bottle of Wright's Liquid Smoke.jpg
Liquid smoke is real smoke, and it is the easiest way to get smoky flavor into sous vide barbecue.

J. Kenji López-Alt

Liquid smoke gets a bum rap, but it shouldn't. The good brands, such as Wright's or Colgin, are quite literally nothing more than smoke and water in a bottle. To make it, manufacturers burn hardwood—just like you would in your smoker—then run the moist smoke through a condenser, where water vapor condenses and traps the smoky constituents—just like how water vapor condenses and deposits smoke flavor on the surface of meat. This water drips down and is collected and packed into bottles.

According to flavor and fragrance experts Leffingwell & Associates, the vast majority of compounds that lend smoke its unique aroma—smoky phenols derived from burnt wood lignin, and burnt caramel–scented cyclopentenones from cellulose—make their way into those liquid smoke bottles as well. In taste tests I've held, most folks cannot tell the difference between truly smoked meats and those treated with judiciously applied liquid smoke.

To get a smoke flavor that penetrates the meat but doesn't overwhelm it, I like to add liquid smoke directly to the sous vide bag just before sealing it. The good part is that you don't have to worry about distributing it evenly. Just shake a few drops in and seal the bag, and as the meat cooks, the juices it releases will distribute the liquid smoke flavor naturally.

Achieving Smoke Rings Using Sous Vide

A photo of pork ribs cooked sous vide, with a visible pink smoke ring
Adding curing salt to the dry rub gives sous vide pork ribs a pink "smoke" ring.

J. Kenji López-Alt

The smoke ring? You mean that pink ring of meat that appears around the edges of a well-smoked rack of ribs or brisket? Yeah, what about it?

Here's the fact: The smoke ring is purely cosmetic. That's right. It signifies absolutely no guarantee of smoke flavor or proper cooking. The smoke ring appears due to the interaction of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) with myoglobin, the natural pigment that makes meat red (a close relative of hemoglobin, the red blood pigment). As meat cooks in a carbon- and nitric-oxide-rich environment, its pink color becomes "fixed," preventing it from oxidizing and turning into metmyoglobin, the brown pigment you see in cooked (or old) meat. A red "smoke" ring will appear in any environment in which meat is slow-cooked in the presence of CO or NO, whether or not any smoke is involved in the process at all. For some deeper science on the smoke ring, I highly recommend reading this great smoke ring myth-busting article from AmazingRibs.com.

All that said, what if you do want a smoke ring to help you replicate the barbecue experience as fully as possible? There is no CO or NO present in a sous vide bag, so getting that smoke ring seems like an impossibility, right? Not so fast. We can't get the exact same reaction, but we can get one that's darn close by using pink curing salts, a.k.a. sodium nitrite. The reaction between sodium nitrite and myoglobin is very similar to that between myoglobin and CO/NO, and it has the same end effect: fixing the pink color. By adding a small amount of sodium nitrite to the spice rub and letting the meat rest in that rub overnight, you end up with a nice pink "smoke" ring after it's done cooking—no actual smoke involved!

I can already hear the cult of barbecue beating a path toward my door. "That's not real barbecue!" "It may be delicious, but how dare you!" "Only a Yankee would dare call this stuff barbecue!"

All I can say is, you can fret and call me names all you want. In the meantime, I'll be over here enjoying my smoky, tender, meaty, delicious, and 100% replicable ribs. If you'd like to join me, you're welcome to pull up a seat and grab a rack or two.

Editor's Note: This guide was produced for Serious Eats as part of a partnership with Anova, the makers of the Anova Precision Cooker. You can download the Anova Precision Cooker App (it's free) to grab all this information right off your phone or tablet while you're cooking.

Recipe Facts

4.5

(47)

Active: 60 mins
Total: 16 hrs
Serves: 4 servings

Rate & Comment

Ingredients

For the Spice Rub:

  • 1/3 cup paprika

  • 1/3 cup dark brown sugar

  • 1/4 cup kosher salt

  • 1 teaspoon Prague Powder #1 (optional; see note)

  • 2 tablespoons whole yellow mustard seed

  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

  • 2 tablespoons granulated garlic powder

  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano

  • 1 tablespoon whole coriander seed

  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes

For the Sauce (if making sauced ribs)

  • 1 medium yellow onion, grated on the large holes of a box grater

  • 1 1/2 cups (360ml) ketchup

  • 2 tablespoons (30ml) spicy brown mustard

  • 1/3 cup (80ml) dark molasses

  • 1/4 cup (60ml) Worcestershire sauce

  • 1/4 cup (60ml) apple cider vinegar

  • 3/4 teaspoon (3ml) Wright’s or Colgin liquid hickory smoke

For the Ribs:

  • 2 whole racks St. Louis–cut pork ribs

  • About 3/4 teaspoon (3ml) Wright’s or Colgin liquid hickory smoke

Directions

  1. For the Spice Rub: Working in batches, combine the paprika, brown sugar, salt, Prague Powder (if using), mustard seed, black pepper, garlic powder, oregano, coriander seed, and red pepper flakes in a spice grinder and reduce to a fine powder.

    Grinding sous vide pork dry rub spices in a spice grinder

    J. Kenji López-Alt

  2. For the Sauce (if using): Combine 3 tablespoons spice rub, grated onion, ketchup, mustard, molasses, Worcestershire sauce, vinegar, and liquid smoke in a medium saucepan and whisk to combine. Bring to a bare simmer and cook until reduced and thickened, about 20 minutes. Set aside.

    Simmering Kansas-City style barbecue sauce for sous vide pork ribs

    J. Kenji López-Alt

  3. Prepare the Ribs: Remove the papery membrane on the back of the ribs, using a paper towel or kitchen towel to grip it and pulling it away in one piece. Divide each rack of ribs into three to four portions, with three to four ribs per portion, by cutting through the meat in between the ribs. Rub ribs generously on all sides with the remaining spice rub mixture. (Set aside 3 tablespoons spice rub if making dry-style ribs.)

    Removing the membrane from St. Louis pork ribs for sous vide recipe

    J. Kenji López-Alt

  4. Place individual portions of rubbed ribs in vacuum bags. (Fold over the top of each bag while you add the ribs so that no rub or pork juices get on the edges of the bags, which can weaken the seal.) Add 4 drops (about 1/8 teaspoon) liquid smoke to each bag. Seal the bags, transfer to refrigerator, and let rest for 4 to 12 hours.

    Vacuum-sealing pork ribs before cooking sous vide

    J. Kenji López-Alt

  5. When Ready to Cook: Set your precision cooker to 145°F (63°C) for extra-meaty ribs or 165°F (74°C) for more traditionally textured ribs.

    Setting the temperature for sous vide pork ribs on Anova immersion circulator

    J. Kenji López-Alt

  6. Add ribs to the water bath and cover it with a lid, aluminum foil, or table tennis balls. Cook for 36 hours at 145°F or 12 hours at 165°F. Transfer cooked ribs to a large bowl of water filled with ice to chill thoroughly. Ribs can be stored in the refrigerator at this stage for up to 5 days before finishing.

    Placing pork ribs in water bath to cook sous vide

    J. Kenji López-Alt

  7. To Finish Dry-Style in the Oven: Remove ribs from vacuum bags and carefully pat dry with paper towels. Rub with remaining 3 tablespoons spice rub. Adjust oven racks to upper and lower-middle positions and preheat oven to 300°F (150°C). Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with aluminum foil and place a wire rack in each. Divide ribs evenly on racks, facing meat-side up. Transfer ribs to oven and cook until a crusty bark has formed, about 40 minutes. Serve.

    Sous vide pork ribs browned in the oven

    J. Kenji López-Alt

  8. To Finish Dry-Style on the Grill: Remove ribs from vacuum bags and carefully pat dry with paper towels. Rub with remaining 3 tablespoons spice rub. Light one-half chimney full of charcoal (about 2 1/2 quarts of coals). When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on one side of the charcoal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill, and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Alternatively, set half the burners on a gas grill to the medium heat setting, cover, and preheat for 10 minutes. Scrape the grill grates clean with a grill scraper, then oil the grates by holding an oil-dipped kitchen towel or paper towels in a set of tongs and rubbing them over the grates 5 to 6 times. Place the ribs, meat-side up, over the cooler side of the grill. Cover and cook until ribs are heated through and dry to the touch, about 15 minutes. Transfer ribs to hotter side of grill and continue grilling, turning occasionally, until a crusty bark has formed, about 10 minutes. Serve.

  9. To Finish Sauced Ribs in the Oven: Remove ribs from vacuum bags and carefully pat dry with paper towels. Adjust oven racks to upper and lower-middle positions and preheat oven to 300°F (150°C). Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with aluminum foil and place a wire rack in each. Divide ribs evenly on racks, meat-side up. Transfer ribs to oven and cook until surface is sizzling and ribs are heated through, about 20 minutes. Brush ribs with sauce and return to oven for 10 minutes. Remove from oven, brush with another layer of sauce, and return to oven until sauce is dried and sticky, about 10 minutes longer. Remove ribs from oven, paint with one last layer of sauce, and serve, passing extra sauce at the table.

  10. To Finish Sauced Ribs on the Grill: Remove ribs from vacuum bags and carefully pat dry with paper towels. Light one-half chimney full of charcoal (about 2 1/2 quarts of coals). When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on one side of the charcoal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill, and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Alternatively, set half the burners on a gas grill to the medium heat setting, cover, and preheat for 10 minutes. Scrape the grill grates clean with a grill scraper, then oil the grates by holding an oil-dipped kitchen towel or paper towels in a set of tongs and rubbing them over the grates 5 to 6 times. Place the ribs, meat-side up, over the cooler side of the grill. Cover and cook until ribs are heated through and dry to the touch, about 15 minutes. Brush ribs with a layer of sauce and transfer ribs to hotter side of grill. Cover and cook until sauce is mostly dry, about 7 minutes. Brush with a second layer of sauce, cover, and cook until second layer is sticky, about 5 minutes longer. Remove ribs from grill, paint with one last layer of sauce, and serve, passing extra sauce at the table.

    Collage of finishing sous vide pork ribs with a sauce: whisking barbecue sauce on stovetop, patting cooked racks of ribs dry, browning ribs over a grill, brushing on barbecue sauce

    J. Kenji López-Alt

Pork ribs cooked sous vide, coated in barbecue sauce, next to pickle slices

Special equipment

Sous vide precision cooker, spice grinder, vacuum sealer, charcoal or gas grill (if finishing on the grill), 2 rimmed baking sheets and 2 wire racks (if finishing in the oven)

Notes

Prague Powder #1, a curing salt, can be added to give the ribs a red "smoke" ring. You can order it online.