Poutine Poppers (Cheese-Stuffed Potato Bites With Brown Gravy) Recipe

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Poutine just got pop-able. Morgan Eisenberg

There's a lot to love about poutine, the Canadian dish of brown gravy- and cheese curd-topped fries. But it's not exactly a good finger food at a party, unless you like the idea of dozens of gravy-coated fingers being wiped on the couch. Well, we'd like to introduce the solution to that problem: the Poutine Popper.

Why this recipe works:

  • The tater-tot shape makes them easy to share and perfectly portioned for parties.
  • Serving gravy on the side keeps the poppers crisp on the outside.

Note: While there's nothing quite like the real thing, you can use mozzarella cubes if you're unable to find cheese curds in your area. I use beef bouillon cubes in this recipe to recreate the classic fast-food taste of poutine, but if you prefer to use actual stock, I recommend this brown gravy, which uses chicken stock with soy sauce and marmite (we don't recommend store-bought beef broth, which is almost always poor quality).

Recipe Facts

Active: 60 mins
Total: 105 mins
Serves: 5 to 6 servings

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Ingredients

  • 6 medium russet potatoes, washed and scrubbed

  • Canola, vegetable, or peanut oil, for brushing and deep frying

  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour, divided

  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt

  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

  • 8 ounces cheese curds (see notes)

  • 1 1/2 cups water

  • 2 beef bouillon cubes (or 2 teaspoons beef bouillon granules; see notes)

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

  • 1/4 teaspoon onion powder

Directions

  1. Adjust oven rack to center position and preheat oven to 400°F. Line a baking sheet with foil and place potatoes on top. Brush potatoes all over with oil and bake until pierced easily with a fork, about 40 minutes.

    Let potatoes stand until cool enough to handle. Cut potatoes in half lengthwise and, using a spoon, scoop out the potato flesh and transfer to a bowl. Reserve the skins for another use, such as potato skins, if desired.

  2. Mix potatoes with 1/4 cup flour along with the salt pepper. Working one at a time, shape potato mixture into 1 1/2-inch cylinders, then flatten into your palm, and place 1 or 2 cheese curds, depending on their size, in the center. Using your fingers, fold the potato around the cheese to re-form the cylinder, making sure the cheese isn't poking through in any spots. Set on a baking sheet and repeat with remaining potato and curds. Set aside.

  3. Combine the water and beef bouillon in a microwave-safe container and microwave until hot, about 1 1/2 minutes; stir to blend. In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter and mix in remaining 2 tablespoons flour. Cook until lightly browned, then whisk in beef broth. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally, and reduce to a simmer. Stir in garlic and onion powders and cook, stirring, until gravy thickens, about 3 minutes. Keep warm until ready to serve.

  4. In a deep fryer, Dutch oven, or wok, heat at least 2 inches of oil to 375°F. Working in batches of 4 or 5, add poppers to oil and fry until golden brown, flipping for even browning all over, about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon or spider, transfer fried poppers to a paper towel-lined plate. Serve right away with warm gravy.

Special equipment

Deep-fryer, wok or Dutch oven

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Nutrition Facts (per serving)
526 Calories
33g Fat
45g Carbs
14g Protein
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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 5 to 6
Amount per serving
Calories 526
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 33g 42%
Saturated Fat 12g 61%
Cholesterol 48mg 16%
Sodium 853mg 37%
Total Carbohydrate 45g 16%
Dietary Fiber 4g 15%
Total Sugars 2g
Protein 14g
Vitamin C 14mg 72%
Calcium 307mg 24%
Iron 2mg 13%
Potassium 999mg 21%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.
(Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate.)