Crispy Creamy Fennel Gratin Recipe

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Kerry Saretsky

Every knows Gratin Dauphinoise—it's scalloped potatoes. But I wanted something different, something lighter, something with a bit more attitude. Instead of potatoes, I use planks of thinly sliced fennel, cooked simply in cream, and baked under a blanket of breadcrumbs, herbs, and Pecorino Romano. Serve it alongside a steak, or on its own with a green salad. It's light and bright from the fennel, comforting from the cream, and crunchy from the topping—a keeper.

Recipe Facts

Active: 10 mins
Total: 40 mins
Serves: 4 servings

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Ingredients

  • 2 fennel bulbs, sliced finely by hand, a mandoline, or a food processor (about 1 1/2 quarts sliced fennel)

  • 1 cup heavy cream

  • 2 tablespoons water

  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

  • 1/2 cup breadcrumbs, preferably fresh

  • 1/4 cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese

  • 2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

Directions

  1. Adjust an oven rack to the middle position and preheat the oven to 400°F. In large skillet combine fennel, cream, and water. Season with salt and pepper. In a large bowl, mix together the breadcrumbs, Pecorino Romano, parsley, olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste.

  2. Bring the fennel mixture to a simmer over high heat, stirring frequently, then transfer to a 2-quart oval casserole dish. Top the fennel with the breadcrumb mixture and place on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. Bake until the topping is golden and crisp, about 30 minutes. Serve immediately.

Nutrition Facts (per serving)
306 Calories
27g Fat
14g Carbs
5g Protein
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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 4
Amount per serving
Calories 306
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 27g 34%
Saturated Fat 15g 76%
Cholesterol 72mg 24%
Sodium 403mg 18%
Total Carbohydrate 14g 5%
Dietary Fiber 4g 15%
Total Sugars 7g
Protein 5g
Vitamin C 19mg 93%
Calcium 168mg 13%
Iron 1mg 8%
Potassium 621mg 13%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.
(Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate.)