Which Vitamix Blender Should You Buy? We Compared (Almost) All of Them

Our top pick is the Vitamix 5200 Professional-Grade Blender.

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a smoothie being blended in the Vitamix 5200 blender

Serious Eats / Tamara Staples

Straight to the Point

We recommend the Vitamix 5200 Professional-Grade Blender. It's a longtime Serious Eats favorite and features a tapered blending jar that creates a powerful vortex. It has a no-frills, easy to use interface, making it a good choice for cooks who just want a great blender but don't care about presets or digital controls.

If you’re looking to buy a Vitamix blender, chances are you’re overwhelmed. There are almost a dozen different Vitamixes out there, and they all sound confoundingly similar. What’s the difference between the Vitamix A3300 Ascent and A3500 Ascent? Or the Vitamix Professional-Grade vs. Professional Series models? Adding to the confusion: There is indeed a wide variance in functionality and price between all of the different Vitamix models.

If you’re looking for a quick answer about the best Vitamix, here’s the TL;DR version: Our long-time favorite high-end blender is the Vitamix 5200 Professional-Grade Blender. At about $400, it’s expensive, but it's also by no means the highest-priced Vitamix.

However, we were curious about how other Vitamixes stack-up (including some of the pricier, newer touchscreen models). So, we rounded up 10 popular ones and put them through the paces.

How We Evaluated the Vitamix Blenders

Portioning kale leaves into kale stems into deli containers
Senior Culinary Director, Daniel Gritzer, weighing and portioning kale leaves and stems to ensure each Vitamix gets the same treatment.

Serious Eats / Tamara Staples

Here's the thing: When you get a Vitamix, you're guaranteed to get a powerful blender that works pretty well. Our goal wasn't to determine which Vitamixes were the best and the worst, as we stand by our longterm favorite the 5200 and a lot of these blenders' utility ultimately comes down to what features you want and what you intend to use them for. Instead, we wanted to establish a performance baseline and share any helpful UX observations to serve as more of a guide when determining which Vitamix is right for you.

So, we performed two tasks with each of the blenders (including the 5200, as sort of a control). The first was green smoothies (15 grams of 1-inch kale stems, 30 grams of kale leaves, four ounces of frozen pineapple, and eight ounces of orange juice). We blended the smoothies for 15 seconds, then poured six ounces of it through a fine mesh strainer and weighed, in grams, the fibrous material that remained to gauge blending efficiency. We continued to blend the rest of the smoothie for one minute, again strained and weighed the amount of fibrous material left in the remaining smoothie, and noted the smoothie's final texture and aeration. For our second test, we made peanut butter in each blender with two cups of roasted, unsalted peanuts. On models with variable speeds, we blended the peanut butter first at medium speed, while agitating the contents with the tamper, for 30 seconds. (Models with just two speeds were tested first on low). After 30 seconds, the consistency of the peanut butter was evaluated, then blended for an additional 10 seconds.

Smoothie pulp being strained through a fine mesh strainer.
For the smoothies, we strained out and then weighed the fibrous material left behind by each blender.

Serious Eats / Tamara Staples

Of course, we considered user experience and design. Handling, the blender's controls, and ease of cleanup were all evaluated. We also measured in decibels, using a sound decibel meter, how loud each Vitamix was and took note of its price.

Here's what you need to know about each Vitamix blender to help you decide which one's (mostly) ideal for your kitchen.

Vitamix 5200 Professional-Grade Blender

 Vitamix 5200 Blender Professional-Grade

This incredibly powerful blender has been our top pick for years and for good reason: Its slim, tall jar creates a vortex that pulls ingredients down and keeps them close to the blades, creating silky-smooth smoothies, soups, purees, and nut butters.

Best For:

You can blend most anything with the 5200. It's has a no-frills, 10-speed control panel and lacks presets, but this has never bothered us: with a little use, you'll figure out which speeds work best for what. A lot of Vitamixes, including this one, have an auto shut-off feature should the motor start to get overworked, which provides nice peace of mind. It also features a slow-start which allows you to blend soups with less trouble (too much turbulence too fast can cause hot soup to release steam, sending a blender's lid off and soup everywhere).

Challenges or Shortcomings:

Its tall, narrow jar makes it tougher to fit your hand and sponge into the base (although running the blender with soapy water does the trick). At 84 decibels, it's not the quietest blender and if you're interested in a ton of presets/functions, it doesn't have them.

Key Specs:

  • Noise level: 84 decibels
  • Stated capacity: 64 ounces
  • Warranty: Seven years
The Vitamix 5200 making peanut butter

Serious Eats / Tamara Staples

Vitamix One

While $250 is certainly isn't cheap, the Vitamix One is the least expensive Vitamix model out there. But, it has its limitations (which you can read about below) and we can't recommend buying this blender unless you're using it to just make smoothies once in a while. And even then, this blender is too expensive for what you get.

Best For:

For occasional blending of smoothies, sauces, or dips, this blender will work. But, again, for $250 there are better, non-Vitamix blenders that can do all that and more.

Shortcomings or Challenges:

Testers noted the “borderline intolerable” sound of this model’s motor. Indeed, at 93 decibels, it was the loudest blender we tested. While we did make peanut butter with it (which was gritty), it’s worth noting that the manufacturer’s care instructions state that making nut butter, blending hot soups, or grinding grains with the ONE will void its two-year warranty. The plastic blender base felt cheap in comparison to other Vitamixes and the ONE was also smaller (a 32-ounce stated capacity). The control panel has a single dial and lacks another on/off switch, so if the dial is turned to the right whatsoever when you plug the blender in, the ONE will start.

Key Specs:

  • Noise level: 93 decibels
  • Stated capacity: 32 ounces
  • Warranty: Two years
a close-up look at the Vitamix ONE's control panel
A look at the very minimalist Vitamix ONE's control knob.

Serious Eats / Tamara Staples

Vitamix E310 Explorian Blender

Vitamix E310 Explorian Blender

A small and tidy blender, the E310 Explorian has a manual interface that resembles the 5200 and a control dial that allows you to easily toggle between 10 different speeds. Vitamix considers this model its entry into professional-level blending, so you can expect a moderate price and performance.

Best For:

This model is best for those looking for a compact blender for smoothies, sauces, and less-tough blending tasks. It's a little more expensive than the ONE, but if you're searching for a smaller, starter blender, it's a better investment.

Shortcomings or Challenges:

It’s one of the weaker Vitamix models, as evidenced by the fibrous smoothie it produced (14 grams of mass was left in the strainer after one minute, which was the highest of the bunch and double that of the 5200). During the peanut butter tests, its motor emitted an overworked smell.

Key Specs:

  • Noise level: 84 decibels
  • Stated capacity: 48 ounces
  • Warranty: Five years
Vitamix Explorian E310 blender on the countertop

Serious Eats / Tamara Staples

Vitamix A3500 Ascent Series Smart Blender

vitamix-A3500-ascent-series-blender

This blender features an LED, touchscreen display, a control knob, and a built-in timer that testers found helpful (no setting a separate timer to tell you when one-minute of blending is up). For those looking for a blender with pre-programmed settings, this comes with five of them, including ones for smoothies and hot soups. If you keep your blender out on the countertop, this is a nice-looking appliance and comes in six finishes.

Best For:

This blender excelled during our smoothie test, resulting in a smooth, frothy smoothie with super-fine grit. It struggled more with peanut butter and if nut butter is something you want to make in this blender, we suggest doing so with the tamper, which will help to an extent.

Shortcomings or Challenges:


In general, we found that Vitamixes with wide jars struggled with small-batch tasks, lacking the stronger vortex of tapered containers that pulled ingredients towards the blades. With a tapered container, the tamper is also able to make more contact with the ingredients and push them downwards easily. With wide jars, all of this can make cleanup more challenging, too, as bits of ingredients are more readily thrown upwards, sticking on the walls and lid. The A3500 is also the most expensive model we tested.

Key Specs:

  • Noise level: 69.8 decibels
  • Stated capacity: 64 ounces
  • Warranty: 10 years
a look at the control panel of the Ascent 3500

Serious Eats / Tamara Staples

Vitamix A3300 Ascent Series Smart Blender

vitamix ascent series a3300 blender

This blender is very similar to the A3500 and also has a LED, touchscreen display and a built-in timer. It lacks the presets the A3500 has, which makes the A3300 about $100 cheaper. It's a touch louder (at 72 decibels) than the A3500, but still fairly quiet for a blender.

Best For:

This was also high-performer for smoothies and left nine grams of mass leftover after a one-minute blend. In comparison, the A3500 left 11 grams and the 5200 seven grams.

Shortcomings or Challenges:

The A3300 shares the same struggles as the other wide-canister blenders: It couldn't successfully make smooth peanut butter—a small-batch, tougher task that really benefits from a blender with a narrower, tapered jar.

Key Specs:

  • Noise level: 72 decibels
  • Stated capacity: 64 ounces
  • Warranty: 10 years
Peanut butter being made in the Vitamix Ascent 3500
Wide canisters, like the one on the Ascent 3500, struggled with small-batch tasks, like the peanut butter in progress shown here.

Serious Eats / Tamara Staples

Vitamix Ascent Series A2300 Blender

Vitamix Ascent Series A2300

At a slightly more palatable price point, the A2300 is part of Vitamix’s Ascent line. Like the rest of the Ascent models, the A2300 is better suited for liquids and larger batches of foods, as it has a wide blender canister. It also has a LED screen with a built-in timer, a pulse button, and a 10-speed control knob. We liked this mix of digital and manual control features.

Best For:

This blender is an excellent choice for liquids (smoothies, soups, sauces) and we found that it produced an ultra-smooth, well-aerated drink.

Shortcomings and Challeges:

Again, the wide design of this canister required a higher volume of ingredients to properly blend.

Key Specs:

  • Noise level: 77 decibels
  • Stated capacity: 64 ounces
  • Warranty: 10 years
The Vitamix A2300 Ascent making peanut butter
Wide canister blender like the A2300 struggled with making peanut butter, producing a crumbly nut butter.

Serious Eats / Tamara Staples

Vitamix Ascent Series A2500 Smart Blender

A2500 series ascent blender

This model has wireless connectivity, a LED screen with a built-in timer, and a control knob with 10 settings. It also has three different program settings (smoothies, hot soup, and frozen desserts), which as far as we can tell is the only difference between the the A2500 and A2300 and the reason for the $50 price difference.

Best For:

The A2500 performed nearly identically to the A2300. It made a great smoothie—perhaps a hair smoother than that of the 2300, but the difference was really negligible.

Shortcomings and Challenges:

Another wide jar meant another model that struggled with the tough, small-batch task we gave it of making peanut butter. For these wider jars, we suggest scaling up the amount you make or just opting for a model with a tapered jar.

Key Specs:

  • Noise level: 75 decibels
  • Stated capacity: 64 ounces
  • Warranty: 10 years
The A2500 making a green smoothie
We did like the built-in timer some models, like the A2500 shown here, had.

Serious Eats / Tamara Staples

Vitamix Professional Series 750 Blender

Vitamix Professional Series 750 Brushed Stainless Finish with 64-Oz. Container

This blender has analog controls (i.e. a manual control knob, not a digital interface), but also five presets. For those looking for a large-canister, non-smart blender with some "extra" features, this is a fine option.

Best For:

The word “professional” in this blender’s name is key: We found it to be lacking for small-scale home cooks. The jar is wide and it struggled with a small-batch blending task. That said, if you really only make smoothies, like cooking in batches, or regularly tackle large-scale projects, this is a good investment. 

Shortcomings or Challenges:

The wide, squat blender jar resulted in less peanut butter being nicely blended and more of it thrown upwards, sticking in the lid and jar's grooves.

Key Specs:

  • Noise level: 75.1 decibels
  • Stated capacity: 64 ounces
  • Warranty: Seven years
The vitamix Professional Series 750

Serious Eats / Tamara Staples

Vitamix 5300 Blender

The control panel of the 5300 is reminiscent of the 5200, with a manual knob that can be adjusted mid-purée. We found its no-frills, straightforward interface to be very easy to use and liked the blue light located towards the bottom, front left of the blender's base, indicating whether or not the blender was switched on.

Best For:

The 5300 produced one of the silkiest smoothies we made, with just four grams of fiber left in the strainer after a minute of blending (the 5200 had seven grams, for reference).

Shortcomings or Challenges:

This was another wider blender jar that didn't measure up to a tapered jar's ability to create the vortex necessary for the tougher task of blending a smaller batch of peanut butter (its motor emitted a "cooked" smell after about 40 seconds as well). The tamper tool also appeared to be made of cheaper, thin plastic and didn’t fit snugly into the lid, allowing food to splatter up and out.

Key Specs:

  • Noise level: 87 decibels
  • Stated capacity: 64 ounces
  • Warranty: Seven years
an empty vitamix 5300 sitting on the countertop
The blue light on the 5300's base indicated whether or not the blender was turned on.

Serious Eats / Tamara Staples

Vitamix 7500 Blender

At about $500, the Vitamix 7500 sits solidly in the middle when it comes to price and it has a simple, no-frills interface, but it fell short in some basic criteria. It was the second-loudest model we tested And like the Ascent series, this blender will best serve smoothie drinkers or those looking to blend liquidy foods.

Best For:


This produced a nicely, if slightly inconsistently, aerated smoothie with fine grit, containing just four grams of unprocessed fiber at the end of blending. If you're mostly blending smoothies, soups, sauces, and large batches of foods, it'll work well.

Shortcomings or Challenges:

This model really struggled with the peanut butter; one tester noted that the peanut butter “painted” the inside of the jar instead of being pulled down into the blender's blades and processed to a smooth consistency.

Key Specs:

  • Noise level: 92 decibels
  • Stated capacity: 64 ounces
  • Warranty: Seven years
A look at the control panel of the Vitamix 7500

Serious Eats / Tamara Staples

FAQs

Is a refurbished Vitamix model worth it?

Yes, with a caveat. If you’re looking to buy a used Vitamix, it’s advisable to buy directly from the brand. Used, or as Vitamix calls them “reconditioned” blenders, are thoroughly inspected and repaired by their professionals before reselling. Although a certified reconditioned Vitamix blender may cost more than a Facebook Marketplace score, it comes with a three- to five-year warranty. 

If you’re in the market but not in a hurry to buy, it’s worth regularly checking the certified options available—the stock is always rotating and refreshing.

What's the quietest Vitamix blender?

The A3500 is the quietest Vitamix model. This is part of the brand’s Ascent series, featuring smart technology, a touchscreen, presets, and more. Of course, you’ll pay a premium for the noise control, as well as all a bunch of other features. At just under $600, it's one of Vitamix’s most expensive models.

Can you clean a Vitamix in the dishwasher?

This is a “can you” vs. “should you” situation. Some Vitamix blender jars are dishwasher-safe (on the top rack). But as with all high-quality kitchen equipment, you’re better off cleaning your Vitamix by hand. For liquid jobs, like smoothies and soups, a drop or two of dish soap and a splash of water in the carafe will get the job done—just blend the detergent, then dump it out. Refill with water and repeat until the soap and food debris are gone.

Sticky or solid items are a little trickier to clean from a blender jar, which is where the right tool will come in handy. Long-handled bottle brushes tackle stuck-on bits while keeping your fingers safe from the blades. 

It’s also worth noting that the dishwasher can leave behind a filmy residue that can lend off flavors, so if you do go that route, be sure to manually rinse it a few times before using it.

Are Vitamixes on sale for Prime Day?

Yes! Vitamix usually has on sale for Prime Day. Check out this page where we'll be posting the best Prime Day home and kitchen deals, including Vitamix.