Profile

C Baughn

College student at UAB with a passion for finding awesome pizza ideas and recipes.

  • Location: Birmingham, AL
  • Favorite foods: Pizza, and that is enough!
  • Last bite on earth: My grandmother's homemade baked beans, green beans, fried squash, and her famous fried chicken with buttered yeast rolls. I could die today if I had that meal and be happy.

On Paula Deen

Wait, didn't all those comments happen a LONG time ago? People do change, and from what I understand they weren't used in malice. That doesn't justify her words, but it does change the context of the situation somewhat.

Win Pop Chart Lab's Worldwide Cheese Wheel Poster

A strong blue cheese like Roquefort because, well, I just love stinky cheeses.

Father's Day Giveaway: Win a KettlePizza Pro 22 Kit

He always cooks frozen pizza.... And always leaves it on the cardboard. I love him, but sadly dad's no cook! He leaves it to me.

Open Thread: What's Your Favorite Chinese Takeout Order?

Wonton Soup and Shrimp Lo Mein!!!!!! Best combo ever.

Red Pearl and Super Oriental Market in Birmingham, AL is out of this world. Smokey isn't a strong enough word for the lo mein, yet it's lightly, lightly colored. Their chefs are great with the wok.

Shrimp and Grits from 'The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen'

I thought traditional shrimp and grits always used cheesy grits and not plain ones?

Sauced: Balsamic Barbecue Sauce

You need to make one that is balanced and I bet you'd like it. It isn't an all purpose sauce, but it definitely can have it's place. Especially on a burger or steak.

AHT Giveaway: Case of Pat LaFrieda Burgers

Firing up the Weber, making old fashioned burgers with soft and small Merita buns, toppings laid out on the patio table, and a pitcher of cold sweet tea to be enjoyed by the family.

Gotta have the warm air of a Spring evening blowing slightly too, past the dogwoods and right onto the deck. I can't think of anything better than fresh Spring air in rural Alabama.

Sorry if this is a bit poetic for a burger party, but there is truly nothing more enjoyable than a family burger cookout. Cheap to prepare and just as tasty as a steak dinner without all the expense, pretense, and hassle. It's the Christmas and Thanksgiving time of the Summer months!

The Food Lab: 61-Day Dry-Aged, Sous-Vide, Torched-and-Seared Bone-in Ribeyes (AKA The Ultimate Steak)

First, a note: I am color blind. Very color blind.

But does the steak at the top look black and not heavily browned? It seems that it would taste burnt and have a unpleasant jerky like layer on top. Once again, colors aren't my thing but I noticed that no one else has really said anything about how dark that steak is. I love a good charred steak but have never had one that is that evenly blackened.

I am not questioning your cooking skills Kenji because you have taught me so much, I am just wondering if that level of darkness is a personal preference or if that is the level of coloration that most high end steakhouses achieve. I have never been to one of those establishments to be able and judge.

What dish best represents the food of your region?

@rasellerso If you want an upscale dining experience them Birmingham is where you need to be. Frank Stitt, Chris Hastings, and many other talented chefs are trying to bring food to a higher level in Alabama and introduce our residents to a new way of thinking about how you eat in restaurants.

That said, what is wrong with all the things you mentioned? I don't think that those foods lend themselves to only being "shovel" worthy dishes. I think they are all southern dishes that lend themselves to the south as a whole. But I will say that as far as unique dishes go that are only located in Alabama there are few, if any. We do the classics well though, and some of the best meals I've ever had has come out of home kitchens. They may not have stressed plating or refinement, but that goes against simple southern food in the first place in my viewpoint. Effort and flavor were definitely there in high amounts. Okay, off my soapbox! LOL.

What dish best represents the food of your region?

Alabama White Sauce on Grilled Chicken. Unique to Alabama, and even Northern Alabama. It's a regional thing to say the least. It's great too, I wish it would spread to other regions of the country and gain popularity. Alabama needs to garner some attention for a particular dish. Most of the food we have is regionally inspired from other states.

Brie and Nutella Grilled Cheese

Do you want the recipe to use a mild triple cream brie or something VERY mild like President's brand brie?

I know my favorite brand to eat alone or as an appetizer is Le Petite, but it can be very strong and ammoniated tasting depending on the ripeness, which I wasn't sure if that is the kind of brie you were wanting the recipe to use.

The strong flavor may play nice with the Nutella though not sure. Definitely don't want to waste $10.00 on a wedge of Le Petite to find out though so maybe you can direct my ideas here.

Video: The Food Lab's Foolproof Hollandaise in 2 Minutes

+1 to Peekpoke's comment way up there!

Foolproof 2-Minute Hollandaise

Could you just melt the butter in the measuring cup in a microwave? Never tried melting that amount of butter in the microwave personally. T

hat would save having to wash a pot, which is a definite pro and takes one step out. Truly 2 minute hollandaise then, even with the clean up!

What Are Your 'Dollar Menu' Favorites?

Arby's Junior Roast Beefs and ham 'n cheeses. Such a great deal and good to reheat from the fridge.

Pomfret Help!!!!

Holy shiat, Pomfret is right at the top of all the fish I've ever had. Ever ever. The texture is amazing and the flavor is off the charts for a white-flesh fish.

Alright, here's how I did it though just to give you an idea. I removed all the fins and scales, them stuffed it with plenty of lime slices and large torn pieces of Thai basil (which is so much better than normal basil btw! Sprinkled some salt in there and that was that. The I made cuts deep on each side about 1" apart all the way down the fish, and rubbed them and the whole fish with olive oil, kosher salt and smoked pepper, then stuffed some Thai basil and minced garlic in the slits and sprinkled the rest over the fish.

To bake it, I lifted it up off the tin foil using lime slices so it wouldn't stew in juices and would cook more evenly. Right before I slid it in the 475 degree oven I hit it with some lime juice and a SMALL sprinkle of Harissa just because I wanted some color and also a bit of sweet smoked paprika. I think it baked about 23 minutes when I pulled it out to rest, and it was so flaky and juicy. Served it with nothing more than cheese grits and some crusty bread to sop up the juicy goodness on the plate.

If you ever see Golden Pomfret, get it!!!! The bones are so easy to eat around and are fairly large and there is a TON of meat on the fish. I can see this fish being cooked in any regional style and being flavorful and good. I say that because I served Creole cheese grits and it complimented awesomely. :) Good to know branching out and randomly buying a fish I've never seen worked out. Mackerel or milkfish is next! Or even tiny smelt heads, guts and all!

Thank you so much for the inspiration guys, y'all's posts really gave me the go ahead to just cook the damn thing and not worry about it so much!

The Food Lab: How to Make All-Belly Porchetta, the Ultimate Holiday Roast

Thank you so much, you are the man. I'm striving to get to your level of knowledge and skill on cooking. You and Alton Brown are the two main reasons I am on this awesome road now. Much appreciation for that, and the help on the porchetta. Definitely enjoyable branching outside my mini-WSM smoker with pork products.

Pomfret Help!!!!

Thank you so much Annie! I have thought about trying to plank grill this fish but I'm afraid the skin would come out all wrong. I may just give your ideas a go because the only other option I was considering was grilling it regularly with butter and lemon stuffed inside it and some kind of lemony rub over the outside with slits in the fish. I'll take that baked idea and run with it I bet. Maybe someone else will chime in too here soon. Gonna get going in an hour or two.

The Food Lab: How to Make All-Belly Porchetta, the Ultimate Holiday Roast

Please help me here. I am having a huge problem getting my Porchetta to come out juicy all the way through. Only the center layers are coming out great, and the ends are ending up rather chewy and dry a good bit even through the outer layers of meat. The skin is amazing, puffy like a great pork rind, but it's that meat that is saddening me.

The porchetta I am making is only a roll of belly about 5 inches long since that is the only way the Asian market will cut it, so I don't have the option of making one of those long impressive roasts. The most rounds of string I have to make is two in order to get it to not unroll.

Do I need to cook it low and slow, like 225 instead? Maybe 300 is drying out my outside before the inside can hit 180 and allow the collagen to convert to gelatin. Please help me though, I really don't want the VERY dry ends and dry outer ring. A short roast may not be able to be fixed though, but hopefully you guys can help me. Gotta figure this out because it is truly the best pork thing ever. Even better than the best pulled pork I've had, and I live in the South at that.

What is the Worst Food You Made This Week?

Fried rice and I even did it on the charcoal grill for high heat. Never turned out to be more than soy sauce flavor with none of that wok-hay flavor. I was so sad but it has become the normal for my wok cooking.

I am dead serious when I say that lo-mein and fried rice are better left up to professional chefs in restaurants. Not worth the time, hassle, or ingredients and it never tastes as good and is 99% of the time cheaper when you get a meat version since it's so high in the stores these days.

The Nasty Bits: Pig Ears Larb

Chi-chi, when you use Fish Sauce, do you use the clear variety or the cloudy variety? I have seen both and was hoping to know what most of your recipes call for. I figure they both have a huge difference in taste but maybe not. Wanted to get it right before I coughed up the cash for a bottle.

The Burger Lab: Building A Better Big Mac

Xanthan gum really does make the Big Mac sauce exactly like what they sell in the store. Slightly slick and a bit gloppy, bit I almost prefer it when I am eating a replica Big Mac so I get the exact same experience.

I would recommend buying a bag and you'll have it for a LONG time. It's great for thickening a massive variety of sauces as long as you are judicious with its addition.

Sausage Gravy

Have you ever tried just sprinkling the flour on the sausage and not removing it from the pan? I do that, but I usually have to add a touch more rendered fat (bacon drippings usually) to the pan since it comes out a touch dry and doesn't want to cook the raw flavor out of the flour as much. I do it because it's easier though and it has always come out good for me.

Yorkshire Pudding

Thank you so much Sydney!!! I am going to make one tonight to go with some lamb loin chops I have. Luckily I have some rendered lamb fat in the fridge so this can be baked while the chops are grilling.

Yorkshire Pudding

About what size roasting pan would you use? I don't even have a roasting pan, but was hoping to find something suitable that might work. I have a variety of stainless steel bowls that you can get at restaurant supply stores cheap that might work, or maybe even a 13x9? Just wondering what size I'll need for your amount of batter. Thanks!

Sauced: Rye and Brown Sugar Mustard

Do you think cooking the liquid to get the alcohol out after the soak would screw this up? And would you need to remove the seeds if you did? I am not too big on alcohol consumption really, but I use it a lot cooking. If so I'll just skip this recipe and give all the others a try. The ones I've done so far from you have been awesome BTW. Get on the Meatwave I say.

Pomfret Help!!!!

Well I purchased a whole, uncleaned frozen pomfret at my Asian market on a whim and now I gotta figure out how to cook this thing and I want to find out if there are going to be a ton of bones if I cook it whole and also tips on recipes. I've found very little on Google really that isn't a curry style dish and I don't want that really.

I already have it cleaned and all the fins removed and the eyes out, along with the scales scraped really well, but do I need to remove the skin somehow, or will it cook up nicely and be crisp is roasted? Didn't know if it was like catfish skin and had to be removed. Going to cook this thing tonight hopefully in about 6 hours so any tips would be great! I may wait till tomorrow though if it takes some time to get help or if I get any tips at all! LOL.

Picking Up Two Live 90lb Boar Pigs!!!

Well guys, I was cruising Craigslist and came across a guy giving away two pigs that were crossed with a wild boar and each weighs around 90 pounds and is ready to slaughter! I am probably going to dispatch them there and go ahead and stick them that way they will bleed out and not get it all in the back of my Jeep. Gonna get them home then and dress them out whole and figure out what to do with meat and carcass at that point. Gotta see how much fat is on the animals before I go past that point. I planned on doing one of them whole and the other separating into smaller cuts, i.e. ribs, butts, etc and freezing those for later.

My question is, has anyone ever had any experience cooking a smaller pig whole on any of their equipment? I am almost at a loss on how to cook these things, but when I saw that two whole pigs and all their meat was being given away for absolutely free I had to jump. It's just too exciting cooking a whole animal to pass up. That said though, need be I can process them both and freeze the one whole and figure out how to physically get the things to smoke later.

Any help would be great! Gonna be some damn good eating I have a feeling, and being the one to end an animals life really brings the food scene full circle and makes you appreciate the life the animal gives to sustain us.

Also, does anyone know of a company in Northern Alabama that rents roasting spits and such? I haven't been able to find anything on the web.

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