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neeki

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Win a Copy of 'Fried & True'

Prawn paste chicken (har cheong gai). Marinated chicken pieces coated in prawn paste, coated in a light batter, and deep fried.

A Tour of a Singaporean Wet Market

The picture of "tongue" isn't tongue, it's actually the lining of the inside of the bovine mouth. The papillae on the tongue are similar, but smaller, and tongues usually are still in tongue form when they're sold. They could be sheep or goat ones as well, visually, the main difference is the size. A lot of these types of stranger offal are imported from Australia and the US; they are tossed into big tubs at the abattoir, and I was interested to see that the mouth linings still twitch for a long time after they've been separated from the rest of the cow.

DIY Grape-Nuts Cereal

please please please do a cap'n crunch peanut butter crunch recipe! i miss that so much from the US!

Quick and Easy 1-Hour Pho

Kenji doesn't lie, it is quick and almost as good as the traditional version, and better than most takeout stuff! I didn't grind up the beef and chicken together, and I just used my chicken carcasses whole. I increased simmering time by 30-40 minutes to compensate. The broth was cloudier as I didn't bother clarifying it, and I like the meaty bits anyway. It's a keeper Kenji, thanks!

The Food Lab: Perfect Boiled Eggs

Kenji, how long would you reckon it would take an ostrich egg to reach 155 degrees if I maintained it in a 155 degree water bath? My particular egg weighs 1.5 kg.

Why does grilled food taste better?

Well, I spend a large portion of my time reading journal articles, so questioning and testing is how I tend to view issues. I would say it was beat into me (and I would say most people with a science background), that you cannot state a "fact" without evidence, and I'd personally feel a bit cheated if grilled foods taste great because of a placebo effect and nothing else. I guess my world view isn't very common.

Why does grilled food taste better?

Hm, maybe someone should do a double-blind taste test to settle the psychological vs. Maillard question!

Why does grilled food taste better?

@AnthonyC: Yes, I do think they cook faster on the grill actually. I did the grilled ones and the baked ones the same way, wrapped in foil with butter. I believe the baked ones took twice as long as the grilled ones, which seems like a likely explanation. Perhaps the direct heat not only makes the potatoes and corn cook faster, but it also allows the butter to penetrate better?

@thingstea: I'd also add that the smell of the grill heating up makes my mouth water, which adds to what AnthonyC said about the Maillard products.

Why does grilled food taste better?

Thanks scotchncoffee! Will hit up my local hardware store sometime soon.

25 Malaysian Dishes You Should Know

This is a pretty good roti canai recipe (it's called roti prata in Singapore): http://ieatishootipost.sg/2010/06/how-to-make-roti-prata-aka-roti-canai.html#more

It's pretty in-depth and comes with a video too.

Why does grilled food taste better?

@scotchandcoffee: Yes, I'm looking to get a proper smoker box sometime soon! Although where I live, it's a bit difficult to find wood chips.

@chc82: Perhaps it's because it's an old grill and has effectively been seasoned by oils from cooking for many years? Although when I have a really nice steak, I'd prefer to sear it on the stovetop as I think it gives me more control over the doneness, and you'd want to taste the flavor of the steak more than anything else.

The Maillard and smoke you guys mentioned sound like a pretty good bet. I have a feeling the Maillard reaction is different on the grill and cast-iron pan as well, maybe it's because of the extra ventilation from the grill surface?

Why does grilled food taste better?

@BF: I did think that it could just be psychological, especially when we associate grilling with holidays and gatherings. You sound like my brother! We once caught him in the bathroom lighting things on fire in the sink.

@thearrogantchef: Charcoal does taste better, and back home that's how we do it, but unfortunately, I don't have the time to set up a charcoal fire most days (and weeks), so I'll be sticking with propane for awhile. There's a great yakiniku place back home that actually imports their charcoal because of the distinctive flavor it gives the meats. Their ox tongue is like crack to me.

"Seriously Indian"?

Yes! I love Indian food, but I never get it right when I do it at home.

Sunday Brunch: Bacon-Wrapped Toads in a Leek-Filled Hole

So delicious. @missjane, your tin was nowhere near hot enough. The oil should sizzle when batter drops in, if not the pudding will be just as you described.

Do or Dine: A Whacked-Out But Charming Bed-Stuy Eatery

oh god. foie gras and doughnuts, my two favorite things, combined into one. there is nothing i want more right now.

Cook the Book: Brown Bread Ice Cream

If you don't feel like making it at home, and you live in Los Angeles, Scoops sells a really good brown bread ice cream.

Seafood in San Francisco?

I think Swan Oyster Depot is exactly what you're looking for. It's a little place with only bar seating, so you can't really go there with more than two people. They have a few different types of oysters, like Miyagis, Kumamotos, and Blue Points, as well as littleneck and cherry stone clams. Their smoked salmon and clam chowder are really good too. It pays to go early in the day though, as a line forms around midday.

Homemade Bagels, à la Jo Goldenberg

These bagels were the first bread I've made that came out edible. Thanks Adam! However, the crumb didn't come out like that picture up there; it's much more coarse and doughy. Any idea why that happened? Thinking back, perhaps I didn't get the dough as satiny as it should have in the processor, and it's cold now, so the rise may not have been as good, although I did pop the stuff in a warm oven for awhile.

Potato Rolls

I've never had a Martin's potato roll, sadly, but this recipe appears to be quite popular: http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/side-dish/recipe-potato-dough-rolls-016086

I've never had any luck with it, and I think it may be because the recipe doesn't call for kneading, and maybe it should. Also, I can't bake bread for beans, even though I keep trying :p

This Week at Serious Eats World Headquarters

I have a deep and everlasting love for chocolate con churros. And any type of prosciutto-style cured hams. I think I was so happy when eating some Parma ham once that I laughed and a piece got into my nose...like how milk's supposed to squirt out. I tasted that for about an hour afterwards.

The Nasty Bits: Lard Focaccia

That is such a great idea. The only thing holding me back is that my breads invariably fail.

The Nasty Bits: Skate Wing

I like it best barbecued with a generous amount of sambal belachan.

The $517 Burger that's totally worth it!!!

Yes! Comme Ca is really good, I love their fries too. If you're still in LA, try Animal, Mastros, Gumbo Pot, and Baby Blues BBQ as well. And since you're happy to travel for food, take a trip up to San Francisco as well for Swan Oyster Depot, La Folie, Dottie's Diner, Cafe Claude, and Boccalone.

Snapshots from Thailand: Street Food in Bangkok

@sunpech, i don't think you're going to the right places in singapore. one bad thing about singaporean food culture is that it's very difficult for tourists to find out about the legit places.

The Nasty Bits: Sweetbreads

I think that the throat and heart sweetbreads are both from the thymus gland of the young animal, as the thymus glands of calves and lambs extend laterally up the neck and down in the chest. The pancreas is down in the abdomen, adjacent to the small intestine.