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The Tea Cup and the Dragon: Secrets of China's Favorite Green Tea

When outsiders try to learn about tea, they're usually stymied by the industry's mindboggling complexity, and a marketplace rife with misinformation and counterfeit product doesn't do much to help. That's why I've made the journey to one of China's tea capitals: to learn how and why this little leaf from a plain-looking shrub drives a whole economy wild. More

Everything You Need to Know About Keeping Bees and Producing Your Own Honey

@thebarkingdog I MIGHT have had a Wickerman supercut on repeat while editing this piece.

New York Essentials: 10 Must-Eat Desserts in NYC

@suddenlysandwiches Good point! We've updated the post.

It's a Miracle: These Chicken-Breast Kebabs Won't Dry Out

@Werefrog Thanks! Re: pectin in your full-fat yogurt, that should be just fine.

It's a Miracle: These Chicken-Breast Kebabs Won't Dry Out

@GG Sorry, I prefer to respond to people with the same [lack of] civility that they direct to my company. If you'd like to have a real discussion about the ins and outs of web publishing, and why we make the decisions we do, hit me.

@Cassandra Jane We're working on improving Taboola to make the ads more relevant! Stay tuned. And yes, there will certainly be more ice cream.

It's a Miracle: These Chicken-Breast Kebabs Won't Dry Out

@Petey K Josh is credited in the second graf of the article—Daniel's merely writing a post resurfacing the story, similar to our weekend recaps of the week's content.

It's a Miracle: These Chicken-Breast Kebabs Won't Dry Out

I dunno, just some guy who works here.

We're publishing less because the stories we do now take more time and resources, and the vast majority of our readers aren't constantly coming back to the homepage. For some publishers, volume of posts is the way to grow. We're taking a different approach that our guts and site metrics tell us works better.

It's a Miracle: These Chicken-Breast Kebabs Won't Dry Out

This Week at Serious Eats World Headquarters

@akay1 So far as I could tell he just had that one crazy horn. This was the first buck I've encountered; not sure if their horns differ on average from wethers or lady goats.

Why It's Time to Start Making Your Own Sherbet

@BigTimeBG Yup, beer should work fine. Note that all all the sherbets here use cream: the orange and strawberry are made with buttermilk, and most sherbets use whole milk.

@Anna Markow

@Little Miss Nihilist It'll be a decent substitute for whole milk sherbets but not the sherbets here with cream. Just make sure to use the full amount of sugar.

Watch This New York Chef Make a High-Class Cheez Whiz

You're correct! Pardon our confusion—noted in the first graf now. Honestly this version falls somewhere between the two—more airy than cheese whiz but less solid than easy cheese.

How I Built a Barbecue Restaurant in Brooklyn: The Trouble With Contractors

@formz Please keep things civil. You're welcome to express your opinion on an author's ideas but not to make personal attacks, per our comment policy.

@mgnnn Tyson's instagram feed is also loaded with doughnuts. It's a real problem to be his friend on facebook.

Why It's Time to Start Making Your Own Sherbet

@Ocean That's very true, but if we're tracking etymologies a corruption is a corruption regardless of one's prescriptive grammar.

@Sennin Probably something along the lines of "frozen dairy dessert," "ice milk," or low-fat ice cream. But practically speaking, the root beer and milk tea recipes you see use cream and this have too much fat to legally be called sherbet, but I use the term anyway.

How I Built a Barbecue Restaurant in Brooklyn: The Trouble With Contractors

And for the record, no, Tyson didn't pay us to publish this series. He is a paid freelance contributor like any other, one I sought out to write for the site.

How I Built a Barbecue Restaurant in Brooklyn: The Trouble With Contractors

@Double_J Serious Eats Copy Editor is in no way affiliated with the site, though that would be an easier explanation for a person's passion to be vitriolic on the internet all day.

S/he is also incorrect about this being a sponsored post. Sponsored posts (which used to be called advertorials back in the day) are labeled as such. Some of our editorial content is sponsored by brands, much like brands may sponsor segments of a TV show, but those brands have no creative control over that content. Hope that clarifies things!

How I Built a Barbecue Restaurant in Brooklyn: The Trouble With Contractors

@Serious Eats Copy Editor Uhh no.

The Ultimate Mister Softee Secret Menu

God forbid editors write headlines that compel readers to click on articles. Oh, the humanity!

Upgrade Lamb and Lentils in 1 Step With Berbere Spice

Love love love berbere. Everything should smell like it.

The Food Lab: How to Make Adana Kebabs (Turkish Ground Lamb Kebabs)

@anaya Aleppo is brighter, often hotter, and less smoky than urfa, which has an almost raisin-y taste. I bet both would be tasty but the flavors are distinct.

What's the Difference Between Dutch Process and Natural Cocoa Powder?

@jonnytakes5 @VeganWithaYoYo D'oh! Yes, that.

Scooped: Easy Peach Sorbet

@mefoxlaw You can blend most herbs right in with the fruit. Rosemary gets a little woody though; it's better to steep stalks in the purée for a couple of hours depending on your desired intensity.

Taste Test: 1 Day, 23 Pop-Tart Flavors

@magistrascaevola Whoops, yup, 14-inch cubic box!

@ThePlainCheese Every flavor is broken down within its category.

@CassandraJane Write up is in the chocolate section. One of my favorites!

@all I want to do toaster streudel next! One of my favorites.

Scooped: Ginger Beer, Rum, and Coconut Sorbet

Just for flavor. Cold turns flavors way down, so I tend to add a good amount of salt to keep the acidity and spice up.

Scooped: Ginger Beer, Rum, and Coconut Sorbet

@Bakin' in Bernie Definitely feel free to reduce the salt .

The Elements of Barbecue: The Case of Sauce

@ebgai Robert's doing a whole series on barbecue. We couldn't leave out his statement on sauce!

This Week at Serious Eats World Headquarters

Glad we could hug it out.

Dulces: Arroz con Leche (Rice Pudding)

I couldn't help but think of the stereotypical fiery Latin temperament when I was making this recipe. Arroz con leche (riz au lait or rice pudding), is such a languid, drowsy, gentle thing, so tender it's even suitable for those with smooth gums and weak constitutions, and yet, it is among the most well-liked and frequently made desserts throughout Latin America. Maybe we're all bark and no bite. More

How to Buy, Store, Use (and Re-Use!) Spices

It continues to baffle me how little attention is given to spices today. Maybe it's because we're told to eat local (they rarely are) or organic (they're usually not). Spices seem to still have a reputation of being slapdash cover-ups for mediocre chicken—and far too often they are—but they don't have to be. Yes, spice hunting requires a little time, effort, and money (though less than you think), but once you start using fresh spices in you're cooking, you may just find yourself addicted. More