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Meg Hourihan

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  • Location: New York
  • Favorite foods: Eggs, liverwurst, cheeseburgers, oysters

Commercial-style residential stoves: how hot is too hot?

@dbcurrie We've done exactly that, twice. Capital has received the report and says the temps are fine. And we do have a Ventahood over the stove. But it's the heat vented around the door that's causing the problem. Re: globalization: Capital is a US brand and my understanding is the stoves are made in the US, could be wrong about that though. And we're very much in contact with them about returning the stove.

Does anyone know where the guidelines/standards are for residential and commercial grade stoves? That's really what I'd like to see.

Commercial-style residential stoves: how hot is too hot?

Yes, in fact they've said two things: 1. That the external temp reading is totally within "standards" and 2. That it's the "commercial" nature of the product.

I think both of these comments are b.s. First, they don't even say what standards they mean. Second, the point of buying a residential commercial-style range is for the safety features and insulation that aren't found in true commercial products. So why pay a premium to burn yourself?

I've worked in professional kitchens where the stove knobs didn't get this hot. So this whole thing's seemed pretty outrageous to me.

Also someone asked the make. It's a 30" Liquid Propane 4 burner Capital. I've looked a lot online and people seem to really like their Capitals, no one's complained of this issue. All I can think is we have a lemon or something, but for them to claim there's no problem and that external temps of 150+° are acceptable in a residentail environment is crazy.

Commercial-style residential stoves: how hot is too hot?

Oh we've contacted the manufacturer and the place of purchase. It's the manufacturer who's being very unhelpful. And thanks @dhorst, will do!

just curious

Hmmm, that's a good question. I don't really know! Right now I'm doing lots of offline stuff, like hanging out with my son. And it's great, so it's all I'm focusing on right now.

La Bonbonniere: The Stars, They Like It

Glad you finally made it Adam, and sad I wasn't with you. I haven't been out of my way to eat that burger. I think it is a local thing, and I'm glad you got a sense of the spirit of the place. That's probably 50% of what I loved about it. We recognized everyone who worked there, every time we went in.

One time we were there a woman came in and an older woman (perhaps this same owner? woman you saw) came over to her. She asked where she'd been and the woman said she'd move to the UES or something, but had to come back for a visit! My biggest fear is that like so many great places in the West Village it's going to close and become some shitty boutique.

As for the burger vs CB: I used to get it for lunch often, when I could sit by the window and watch the traffic go by on Eighth Avenue. CB strikes me as more of a nighttime spot.

Guh, now I'm hungry! I might have to make a trip to La Bon asap, regardless of violation points!

Ed Levine's Serious Diet Week 7: Can the 100-Calorie Snacks Be a Trap?

Two words: Junk food.

If you're looking for a conveniently-packaged 100 calorie snack, why not eat an apple (~72 calories) or an orange (~86 calories)? Want less carbs and more protein? Try a cup of yogurt (low fat with fruit, ~115 calories) or a stick of string cheese (~80 calories) or a hard boiled egg (~76 calories).

All the above are easy, tasty, snack foods with the benefit of less packaging and less processing. High fructose corn syrup, preservatives, and processed foods aren't good for your diet whether they come in calorie packages of 1,000 or 100.

Aside from that, yay! Congrats on the continued weight loss.

2007: The Year in Food Trends

Wait a sec Ed, you rail against savory desserts and ice creams and then say the olive oil gelato is good? Isn't that a bit contradictory? I'd say olive oil gelato is a savory dessert, but a delicious one! None the less, I agree with you. I'm tired of pastry chefs trying too hard to be different and weird rather than making a really amazing sweet bite with which to end my meal.

Pregnancy Eats Media Conversation Heating Up

For the most part, I agree with what Brody says. When it comes to prohibited items though, she writes: "Raw fish and shellfish, a possible source of the parasite Toxoplasma that can cause fetal blindness and brain damage." I have never seen this anywhere, though if I had I might have reconsidered eating raw oysters. Sushi is frozen, which kills the parasites.

Another confusing point she makes regards soft, unpasteurized cheeses. Unpasteurized soft cheese is illegal in the US, so the chances of a pregnant woman ingesting it are pretty slim, unless she's making a concerted effort to do so.

And I don't know why she lists prohibitions without explaining the logic behind it. Raw sprouts? I'd like to know why.

Sushi Chefs: Can We Talk?

I will! I've been meaning to write about how I eat while pregnant, will try and find some time today to do so.

The Best Grilling Hot Dogs?

There's a German-sounding brand that is sold by the box at Stop-n-Shop that I love. I can't for the life of me come up with the name, but it's on the meat section, the dogs are linked together, and come probably twenty to a box. Really yummy. I've bought them on Nantucket lots of times. Any one have any idea of the brand?

How much would you spend for direct from the farm, organic meat?

Funny, for some reason I totally wasn't thinking about pork, but beef. I find pork is the one I most notice the difference with, because commercial pork is just awful and dry and has no flavor or yummy fat.

How much would you spend for direct from the farm, organic meat?

Josh, you might want to talk to the farmers and get more information about the meat to understand why it's more expensive. You say it's organic. Are the animals grass-fed or corn-fed? Are they fairly free range or confined to feed lots? Are the ranchers part of the Certified Humane Raised & Handled movement? And what kind of cattle are being used? Is it some kind of heritage breed or a common breed? 60 percent of beef cattle are of the Angus, Hereford or Simmental breeds. Any/all of these factors contribute to the price of your meat.

Of course, it boils down to your values and the taste. If you're concerned about eating local and supporting local farmers (which presumably you are as you joined a CSA), it might be worth paying the extra money, knowing it's supporting the farmer directly. But if it doesn't taste great, even an interest in saving small farms might not be enough to justify doing it.

In answer to your question, I buy almost all my meat direct from the farmer at my local greenmarket here in NYC. It is more expensive, and as such, I don't eat a whole lot of meat. But when I do, I want to know where it came from and what kind of life it had.

The Serious Eats Doughnut Glossary

Your cruller photo is what I (as a New Englander) would call a French cruller. Not a regular cruller.

Enter the Wu-Chang Clan

Junk Food Fed Livestock

Is there no grass in PA?

Batali, Bourdain, and White: Chef Supertrio Engages in Love Fest

Jeez, it's just a blog (and I'm saying this as an English major) not the friggin' New Yorker! Isn't it better to get a timely report about an event that just happened than wait two days for it to travel through the fourth circle of copy editing hell? I'll take the immediacy over the errant semi-colon anyday. :)

When Splitting the Check Gives You a Splitting Headache

It may be more of a New York issue because people's apartments are very small, so usually entertaining and hanging out happens at restaurants. And as such, you get invited to birthday dinners at restaurants and end up splitting the check across the party, "for convenience." Somehow it never works. But it also never works to pass around the check and have each person pony up either. That's why I avoid large group dinners and only go out with close friends.

How do you get toddlers to eat Vegetables?

Make it taste good, like dksbook says, though I don't have children, so this is really just optimistic speculation on my part. But it seems like fresh peas (or freshly cooked flash frozen peas), mashed with a little butter, or mint, would be pretty tasty. Babies in France seem to eat everything. I think it's just a matter of using tasty, quality ingredients, and not giving up if they don't like it the first time. Of course, what the heck do I know? I could be totally wrong. Parents with experience please keep speaking up! :)

Would-be 'Top Chefs' Are Broke Chefs

To second what RichardF said, I posted about this topic over on my site, and one of my readers had a great suggestion about attending The Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State College. $3k for a certificate, ~$6k for two-year degree. If you're really serious about culinary school, it makes to shop around. The CIA degree might be nice on your resume, but you'll still be doing the crap work in the kitchen for low money when you start.

Best San Francisco style sourdough bread in NYC?

I don't know if only Balthazar has levain, I just know they do. I italicized it because it's a French word and it seemed right. I'm not sure they insist on it.

And I for one am happy there's not sourdough everywhere here in NYC. I don't like it and it was distressing to find it in every single bite of damn bread in the whole town. My husband and I used to refer to it as "the tyranny of sourdough."

Best San Francisco style sourdough bread in NYC?

Balthazar Bakery makes a levain but I haven't tried it so I don't know how it compares to San Francisco sourdough.

What is the best pepper mill on the market?

I love my Pepperguns. I have a white one I use for sea salt and a black one for pepper. I especially love that I can operate it with one hand. Very useful when I'm busy in the kitchen. I've used them for years and have no complaints.

Is imported food safe?

I've added the link into the post as well, Lou. Links are stripped out of questions currently. It's on our list of things to get fixed asap.

Quesadilla dilemma!

I've never even heard of a quesadilla machine, and can't figure out why you'd need one. Skillet is what everyone used in Mexico when I lived there. I agree with other folks, return it, and put your money towards tortillas, cheese, and avocados!

What's your favorite recipe to showcase duck eggs?

I've only ever had them while eating out. But I had a poached duck egg on top of beef cheeks at Spotted Pig in New York City and it was delicious.

Commercial-style residential stoves: how hot is too hot?

My mother purchased a high end "pro-style" stove for our family vacation home. Ever since we've had it, the front of the thing (including the knobs and all around the top of the oven door) gets really hot, too hot to touch. At first we thought something was faulty with the door. After months and months, the company has:

1. Given us new knobs, which also get crazy hot.
2. Sent a new door, because they changed the design a bit due to customer feedback.

And it still gets hot, as high as 150° (repairman took measurements for us) in places. The company says this is within standard range and this is "commercial nature" of stove. But I've never had a residential stove get anywhere close to this hot.

We're trying to return it but they're giving us a hard time because it's within "standards". I have a 17 month old son, seems way too hot to me! I mean after it's been on for an hour, I can't even touch the knobs.

I am wondering: does anyone have any experience like this? Does your pro-style (like Wolf or Viking) range get this hot? Have you ever seen any standards for this -- I can't seem to find anything online. TIA.

Are you an Alpha Cook?

Yesterday's New York Times had a great article about kitchen dynamics between couples: He Cooks. She Stews. It’s Love. Are you the alpha cook, who does all the cooking, deigning to let your partner dice the onion? Or are you the beta, forced to do clean up and once and a while allowed to sauté?

I'm the alpha in my household, but I sure I hope I don't come off like some of the folks in the article. I'm always happy when my husband wants to help out, and I love to work together in the kitchen.

Latex gloves in the professional kitchen?

Do you feel better when you see employees wearing these? Do they make any difference when it comes to germs? I always worry that food service folks will get lackadaisical about hand washing since they're wearing gloves. And if they don't change the gloves often, well, how is that any cleaner?

Proper burger cooking technique: Do you flatten the patty while it's cooking?

If you watch some video of people cooking burgers (over grills or on griddles), you'll often see them flatten the patty with the spatula. Wouldn't this squeeze out all the yummy juices and make the burger thinner, thereby prone to cooking faster and getting dried out? Or does it drain the burger in some special way, and get it to cook more evenly? What's the proper technique?

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