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The Best and Worst Wines for a Potluck

I once threw a potluck where five people brought green salad and two brought cookies. Period. Even with the revelers manage to cover the courses, the flavors are a trip around the world: Indian curry, Greek salad, Tex-Mex enchiladas, Swedish meatballs, Mama's Lasagna. The unifying theme, if any, is diversity. So what about that wine? What can you take to a potluck that'll taste good amid the noise of flavors, textures, and styles? More

The Serious Eats Cheese and Wine Pairing Cheat Sheet

It's New Year's Eve, and your guests are about to come tumbling in. You set out bowls of salty snacks and a grand platter of cheeses. There's creamy white chèvre, a Stilton, some Brie, nutty aged Gruyère, tangy Vermont cheddar, and a splurge-worthy chunk of 4-year Gouda. It's time to start popping corks. There's Champagne, of course, and let's see—what else? What wine goes best with all those cheeses? More

The Best and Worst Wines for a Potluck

Great reco. Thanks, Jameson.

The Best and Worst Wines for a Potluck

Rosé's a great choice, too. Thanks for chiming in!

The Serious Eats Cheese and Wine Pairing Cheat Sheet

Thanks, Phil, I'll add iOS app to the list, but let me see if I can pull off the infographic first—!

The Serious Eats Cheese and Wine Pairing Cheat Sheet

@bHIRh Cheers! Let me work on an infographic—and chat with my fabulous editor.

The Serious Eats Cheese and Wine Pairing Cheat Sheet

Keen eyes, Merstar! Sauvignon Blanc—a.k.a. Sancerre, White Bordeaux, or Fumé Blanc—is excellent with grassy, herbal fresh cheeses, especially goat's milk. It was on an earlier revision but somehow wandered off. Thanks so much for catching the oversight! We'll put it right soon.

The Serious Eats Cheese and Wine Pairing Cheat Sheet

Great idea! Not sure about googly eyes, but a printable or save-able format makes sense.

The Serious Eats Cheese and Wine Pairing Cheat Sheet

Thanks for reading, Rabonour! So glad you found it helpful. Happy New Year!

The Serious Eats Guide to Port

Thanks for reading, and for adding your recommendation, too!

The Serious Eats Guide to Port

Thanks, Ben! So glad you enjoyed the article.

The Serious Eats Guide to Port

So glad to hear you found the article helpful. Enjoy your wonderful tawny!

The Serious Eats Guide to Port

Vintage is the only port that truly benefits from bottle age. Some people report success aging Late Bottled Vintage and younger tawny ports, but generally speaking, the non-vintage wines don't improve a great deal with long cellaring by the consumer. Cheers!

The Serious Eats Guide to Port

Thanks for reading! Vintage port should ideally be enjoyed within a day of opening, but most of the younger red ports (Reserve and LBV) and pink and white ports will last up a week or so after opening. Young tawny ports, too, will hold for a couple of weeks, while older tawnies, like older vintage port, are a bit more fragile. I recommend spraying the wine with Private Preserve (an inert gas that displaces the oxygen in the bottle) and corking tightly. All wines will keep longer if refrigerated, so if you must hold it longer than a week, the fridge is a good idea. Hope that helps!

Leftovers: Zombie Restaurants, South Dakota Wines, Sandy Stories, and More

Many thanks for sharing a link to my cheese and wine pairing article. Prost!

The Food Lab: The Science of the Best Chocolate Chip Cookies

I've never been able to get a chocolate chip cookie exactly the way I like. I'm talking chocolate cookies that are barely crisp around the edges with a buttery, toffee-like crunch that transitions into a chewy, moist center that bends like caramel, rich with butter and big pockets of melted chocolate. I made it my goal to test each and every element from ingredients to cooking process, leaving no chocolate chip unturned in my quest for the best. 32 pounds of flour, over 100 individual tests, and 1,536 cookies later, I had my answers. More

The Serious Eats Cheese and Wine Pairing Cheat Sheet

It's New Year's Eve, and your guests are about to come tumbling in. You set out bowls of salty snacks and a grand platter of cheeses. There's creamy white chèvre, a Stilton, some Brie, nutty aged Gruyère, tangy Vermont cheddar, and a splurge-worthy chunk of 4-year Gouda. It's time to start popping corks. There's Champagne, of course, and let's see—what else? What wine goes best with all those cheeses? More