Profile

Lou T

Does The Doughnut Vault Serve the Best Doughnut in America?

It's all about Peter Pan Bakery in Brooklyn. It's been a staple for decades and is everything a great doughnut should be.

Poll: How Many Slices is Lunch?

A nice sized slice and a Coca-cola.

The Food Lab: Deep-Fried, Sous-Vide, 36-Hour, All-Belly Porchetta (Or, The Most Freaking Delicious Thing To Ever Come Out Of My Kitchen)

@Kenji

Can this be kept after being cooked sous vide and refreshed at a later time? For example, could it be cooked, chilled, and deep fried the next day to be refreshed and heated through?

Excellent Neapolitan-Style Pies at Etto in Washington, DC

Edit: Please don't assume every Neapolitan pizza in Naples has been touched by the hand of God... just as in the USA there are plenty of mediocre places. Maybe far less of them, but they do exist. Don't fool yourself.

Excellent Neapolitan-Style Pies at Etto in Washington, DC

Yea, Masse in Torre Annunziata blends 0 soft white winter wheat and 00 flour, but it looks very "Neapolitan" to me.

Anyway, Neapolitan isn't inherently "soupy." Yes, the crust should be very tender but if it's soupy the cheese is probably too wet or something...

On a side note, at least I can pronounce the names of the pies on Etto's menu. Pizzas named in Italian make perfect sense...when you're eating in Italy. Please don't make me fumble or sound stupid by trying to pronounce the pies on your menu because you want to "sound authentic," unnamed and future Nea/Neopolitan joints... might sound insignificant to some but it's something I notice!

Excellent Neapolitan-Style Pies at Etto in Washington, DC

I'm onboard with the on-site milling but the crust looks, unfortunately, inedible.

Video: How the Sausage Pizza is Made at Maria's Pizza in Milwaukee

Looks awesome.

Top This: Eggplant Parmesan Pizza (à la Pitfire Artisan Pizza)

I can't remember the last time I had mint with my Eggplant Parm....

I hope they at least salt the stuff to draw the bitter water out....

Pizza Obsessives: Jimmy Coponi

@ConAglio If you want to push the issue give me your contact info. I don't want to spam the comment section.

Long story short the end result is very close (IMHO) but the road traveled to get there is a little different. In Naples there are a number of ways the dough is prepared including but not limited to fresh yeast, old dough, natural leavens, combinations of the aforementioned and mixtures of flour tailored to the seasons.... Anthony's got his own different thing going on that's more akin to breadmaking....maybe a little more labor intensive but it works. Some of the previous methods are more similar than others, with some producing different flavors due to a number of factors. Even so, I believe they all have a common denominator but I'll discuss that with you via email.

Pizza Obsessives: Jimmy Coponi

@Conaglio Anthony makes great pizza, and it was my favorite at the time I had it in NY. it's just not "traditional." Anyway, never said I didn't want to eat one of Jimmy's pies. They look delicious.... you guys would eat 'em don't lie ;)

Pizza Obsessives: Jimmy Coponi

If you want a truly Neapolitan workflow you're looking in the wrong place if you replicate Mangieri. Just saying.

Real Tacos Al Pastor

Kenji,

Could this be done Sous Vide?

Top This: The Hellboy (à la Paulie Gee's)

If you have the opportunity to try this, you should. It's a killer pie.

Saveur Magazine Releases Special Pizza Issue

As an aside, If there's more video with Roberto it's probably worth it for that reason alone. He also makes mozzarella in house using a pretty clever method...

Saveur Magazine Releases Special Pizza Issue

Unfortunately, it doesn't look like much thought went into the issue. Sugar and oil in Neapolitan dough? Semolina for dusting? For a magazine that claims to champion authentic food...it's not very authentic.

Poll: Sugar in Tomato Sauce, Way or No Way?

@Hedonovore; Well, the application for the tomato sauce would dictate the use of sugar, no? In Neapolitan style pizzas and traditional italian tomato sauces I will not use sugar. However, for some NY style sauces or other styles of pizza sauce I do consider it and have used it.

@Mr. Nick; Interesting on the baking soda trick. I'll try it if I get overly acidic tomatoes at some point.

@CandiRisk; we should be careful when correcting for acidity in tomato sauces. While a sour taste or sensation is one that indicates acidity, sugar does not actually "correct" acidity. It may mask it, to some degree, but the acidity still remains. The only way to change the acidity would to employ the technique Mr. Nick has mentioned. Flavor and pH level are not the same thing.

Poll: Sugar in Tomato Sauce, Way or No Way?

@Hedonovore

But we're talking, with regard to Neapolitan pizza, about San Marzano tomatoes. These tomatoes have origins in Peru, but were masterfully cultivated over centuries in Italy, grown in mineral rich volcanic soil. By nature they have dry flesh and very few seeds. There's a reason they are considered one of, if not the best, sauce tomatoes in the world. The Italian's just happened to "perfect" them.

It's not so much a matter of authenticity or originality. Rather, it's a belief that is often validated by tasting; Truly great tomatoes need nothing other than their bright, red flesh to shine.

Sugar may work in a pinch, but it can never approximate a truly great tomato.

Poll: Sugar in Tomato Sauce, Way or No Way?

In response to pizzablogger's scenario;

The sweetness from good tomatoes may not, necessarily, be the same sweetness one gets from sugar. The sugar in tomatoes comes from fructose and glucose, while sugar is sucrose. I think the idea that one can magically replicate a good tomato by putting in some sugar in the sauce is one that should be challenged a bit more. When I taste a tomato, I'm not looking only for sweetness. Also, can we be sure sugar doesn't affect anything else in the tomato?

I'm firmly in the camp of letting the ingredients stand on their own. Different crops of tomatoes will have subtle differences in flavor, and I think that's a beautiful thing. Personally, it reminds me I'm eating something "real."

But, if worst did come to worst and a batch of tomatoes was so off I didn't want to use it, I'd consider another supplier of tomatoes.

But different strokes for different folks. There's no right or wrong answer, just different approaches.

Brooklyn Central Pizza: Neapolitan Pies Celebrate the Best of Two Worlds

Haven't been, but wouldn't be happy if I was served the Margherita in that picture. Burn cornicione...

San Diego: Project Pie Opens in Hillcrest, With Many More to Come

Ask A Sommelier: What's the Best Wine for Pizza?

Gragnano and Lettere

The Food Lab: Can You Rescue Poorly Stored Mozzarella?

Kenji,

Did this make any difference in terms of flavor or texture on pizza, if you've tried it?

Red Bank, NJ: Front St. Trattoria Rises to the Occasion

Eh, not so sure that's my type of pizza....

Definitely check out Un Dici in Rumson. Amazing, pizza and pastas. Every component made fresh.

Staff Picks: Favorite Late Night Pizza in College

I studied at Rutgers, and one place has stood the test of time; Filippo's Famous Pizza.

They make their own sausage (fennel) that pools delicious fat on the pie. When I went back, I saw a cart of all trumps flour and grande cheese. This is your go to place for NY pizza if you go to NJ's university!

Early Word On Baking Steel: It Works

I'm a little disappointed. I pitched this idea on Quirky over 2 years ago. No one picked it up. This guy pitched my idea on kickstarter...

Lou T hasn't written a post yet.

The Food Lab: A New Way to Cook Pasta?

It turns out that not only do you not need a large volume of water to cook pasta, but in fact, the water does not even have to be boiling. Wait. What? Let me explain. I, and every other trained cook I know have been taught that when cooking pasta, you need to have a large pot of boiling water. If my wife turned out to be right about this, just think of the pastabilities! This could turn my whole pasta-cooking regime on its head. Some serious testing was in order—I called downstairs and told my doorman that I hope he likes noodles, cause that's gonna be his lunch for a few days. More

Clifton NJ: Mario's Restaurant, Home of the 'Emma'-Style Pizza

Emma Barilari liked her pizza thin. So thin that dollar bills laid flat next to a slice threatened to tower over it. So thin that light passed through it. But, at the same time, she didn't like it as crisp as a cracker; she wanted some pliancy and textural contrast. This takes skill and a particular set of circumstances to achieve, a feat that might even require a "secret family recipe." That might have been a problem, except that Emma and her husband happened to own a restaurant called Mario's. More

An Interesting 'Experiment' Demonstrating How Pizza Blisters Form

I got this email from Foolish Poolish last night, with the subject line, "You might find this interesting." Well, FP, I think the Slice'rs would find this interesting, too, so I hope you don't mind me sharing it. And, how apropos, given the NYT story that ran this morning. Observe and learn! —The Mgmt. [Photographs: Foolish Poolish] Here is a dough ball. The dough was mixed from just 160g flour and 100g water (no leavening) and left to rest for 20 minutes.During that 20 minutes, the broiler has been directly heating a pizza stone sitting xx" away from the heating... More

The Food Lab: What's the Point of a Vinaigrette?

For me, the big question about vinaigrettes has never really been "how?" but "why?" Is emulsifying the oil and acid really necessary? Does adding the olive oil and the vinegar to the salad bowl individually really make for an inferior salad? Could every red-sauce Italian joint with oil and vinegar jugs in the world be wrong? Well, stranger things have been true. I decided that a bit of hard-core kitchen work was in order. More

Video: 'Food Curated' Points Its Lens at Paulie Gee

Scenes from Paulie Gee's » All Paulie Gee intel » Food Curated's Liza de Guia, whose work we love, points her lens at Paul "Paulie Gee" Giannone and gets the story behind his recently opened Greenpoint, Brooklyn, pizzeria Paulie Gee's. If you're not familiar with Mr. Giannone's story of how he went from "computer geek" to pizza enthusiast to pizzeria owner, this will get you up to speed. I love how he talks about guarding the provenance of his canned tomatoes. Catch the footage after the jump.... More