Commenter

leapfrog22

A high school kid who enjoys cooking lunch for himself whenever possible.

  • Website
  • Location: Baltimore
  • Favorite foods: Noodles, bread, potatoes, soup, beef.
  • Last bite on earth: Hand-pulled udon.

Latest Comments

Philly Cheesesteak, Meet Dumpling: Introducing the Cheesesteak Pierogi

For some of us it's cheap beer or no beer. I'll take cheap beer over no beer any day of the week! I do enjoy Yuengling Black and Tan over their lager, though.

Ideas in Food vs. The Turkey Club Sandwich

@wildbluehugh

I'm not talking about "the earliest known recipe for a club sandwich". I'm talking about what we as a society accept as a club sandwich. Feel free to reread my previous comment as many times as you like; it doesn't matter to me.

Ideas in Food vs. The Turkey Club Sandwich

"Some people think the turkey club sandwich is special because it has three slices of toasted white bread...In our minds the two things define the turkey club are the turkey and the mayonnaise."

That's like saying, "Some people think that squares are special rectangles because all four sides are equal in length, but in our minds the thing that defines a square is its four sides." - It's just wrong.

The Snowball: A Baltimore Summer Classic

Didn't know it was just a Baltimore thing. I gotta give a shout out to the Snoball Stand in Woodstock, MD, though.

7 Ways to Use a Cast Iron Frying Pan (Besides Frying)

Aluminum would be a much better choice for a heat diffuser as it has far higher thermal conductivity than cast iron or the steels.

Giveaway: Win a Super-Fast Thermapen Thermometer

boneless skinless chicken breast- too easy to overcook

Taste Test: The Best Caesar Salad Dressings

The new taste test format is unfortunate. It's not like I only read taste tests to inform me about what to buy. They used to be genuinely enjoyable to read - not so any more.

How do you like your hummus?

Barely mashed chickpeas with tons of garlic. I love the snappy texture of whole garbanzos.

Varieties of Pasta

Oh, I didn't realize that there was such a thing as a Pasta tree. Silly me, I was under the impression that people actually had to make pasta.

This looks to be a rather comprehensive recipe:

http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-fresh-pasta-from-scratch-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-73435

and this guide might help you with different shapes:

http://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/t--793/cutting-and-shaping-pasta-by-hand.asp

Can I save this dough?

Also, while I am stretching this thread a bit, these two links provide some interesting insight as to the effect of oil on dough in terms handling characteristics. One is written by Peter (Pete-zza) and the other by Tom Lehmann of the American Institute of Baking.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3940.msg172230/topicseen.html#msg172230

http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=38321#p38321

Can I save this dough?

@Kenji

I agree that high hydration dough can produce different (and sometimes superior) results, but it might not be the place for a self-proclaimed novice to start.

Can I save this dough?

That recipe makes a 69% water hydration dough, and as if you add the oil, the 'effective' hydration is a full 10 points higher at nearly 80%. IMO, 69% hydration is too high for NY style pizza, and 10% oil is ridiculously high. I would recommend starting with a standard Lehmann dough at something like 60% hydration (look on pizzamaking.com if you are interested). I am also curious as to the recipe's obsession with keeping the dough cool. A cold fermentation for one day with 0.5% IDY should not require an ice-cold dough. This excessive retardation of the fermentation combined with an obscenely high amount of oil may have inhibited gluten development in your dough. With a dough like this, I would probably make some sort of Sicilian-esque pan pizza where stretching skin isn't necessary. Just plop the dough into a pan and let gravity stretch it for you. It was no coincidence that the focaccia turned out so well- this recipe closely resembles focaccia.