Profile

leapfrog22

A high school kid who enjoys cooking lunch for himself whenever possible.

  • Website
  • Location: Baltimore
  • Favorite foods: Noodles, bread, potatoes, soup, beef.
  • Last bite on earth: Hand-pulled udon.

How do you like your hummus?

Barely mashed chickpeas with tons of garlic. I love the snappy texture of whole garbanzos.

What is your favourite kosher food?

Joyva chocolate-covered jelly rings

Win Pop Chart Lab's 'The Various Varieties of Fruits'

Varieties of Pasta

Oh, I didn't realize that there was such a thing as a Pasta tree. Silly me, I was under the impression that people actually had to make pasta.

This looks to be a rather comprehensive recipe:

http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-fresh-pasta-from-scratch-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-73435

and this guide might help you with different shapes:

http://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/t--793/cutting-and-shaping-pasta-by-hand.asp

Cook the Book: 'Lighten Up, America!'

go through 100 lbs of flour

Seriously Delicious Holiday Giveaway: The Baking Steel

Seriously Delicious Holiday Giveaway: Thermapen Thermometer

boneless skinless chicken breasts

Seriously Delicious Holiday Giveaway: Zingerman's Phantom of the Fridge Secret Stash

Can I save this dough?

Also, while I am stretching this thread a bit, these two links provide some interesting insight as to the effect of oil on dough in terms handling characteristics. One is written by Peter (Pete-zza) and the other by Tom Lehmann of the American Institute of Baking.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3940.msg172230/topicseen.html#msg172230

http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=38321#p38321

Can I save this dough?

@Kenji

I agree that high hydration dough can produce different (and sometimes superior) results, but it might not be the place for a self-proclaimed novice to start.

Can I save this dough?

That recipe makes a 69% water hydration dough, and as if you add the oil, the 'effective' hydration is a full 10 points higher at nearly 80%. IMO, 69% hydration is too high for NY style pizza, and 10% oil is ridiculously high. I would recommend starting with a standard Lehmann dough at something like 60% hydration (look on pizzamaking.com if you are interested). I am also curious as to the recipe's obsession with keeping the dough cool. A cold fermentation for one day with 0.5% IDY should not require an ice-cold dough. This excessive retardation of the fermentation combined with an obscenely high amount of oil may have inhibited gluten development in your dough. With a dough like this, I would probably make some sort of Sicilian-esque pan pizza where stretching skin isn't necessary. Just plop the dough into a pan and let gravity stretch it for you. It was no coincidence that the focaccia turned out so well- this recipe closely resembles focaccia.

Seriously Delicious Holiday Giveaway: The Baking Steel

Seriously Delicious Holiday Giveaway: High Road Ice Cream 6-Pack

Book Giveaway: 'Pizza: Seasonal Recipes From Rome's Legendary Pizzarium,' by Gabriele Bonci

Prosciutto and figs

Introducing the Serious Eats Magazine!

So this is why new website content has been hard to come by lately...

Win Pop Chart Lab's Plethora of Pasta Permutations Poster

Like the milk left after a bowl of Count Chocula
Pasta water is more important than the noodle itself

Less content lately?

I agree. I used to be able to scroll down the homepage for a long time before yesterday's posts showed up again. Now, it's just a few spins of the mouse wheel before you're into old content.

Pizza Obsessives: Jimmy Coponi

@f r y
I agree and I'm at fault more than anyone. Now that I've scrolled down to the comments section of this interview too many times (past the pictures), I can say what no one can dispute: those are some damn fine-looking pies.

Pizza Obsessives: Jimmy Coponi

Wow, Paulie Gee is a real class act, prowling the internet food sites in defense of a cocky kid which he obviously told SE to interview. If the people making all of these 'world class' pies have attitudes like this, a good 'ol "Commercial Neapolitan" sounds good right about now.

Refreshing Food for Hot Weather

Pizza Obsessives: Jimmy Coponi

I'm not judging him based on his ability to purchase an oven and ingredients. I'm simply refuting his logic that I need to have all of this stuff in order to be considered truly passionate about pizza.

Pizza Obsessives: Jimmy Coponi

Good for him, but you guys can't read into his statement that "not much thought or care is put into the product" of even what we generally think of as true Neapolitan pizza, what he calls "Commercial Neapolitan". I think we could reasonably extend this statement to encompass all home pizza makers who use refrigeration, [unnatural] yeast, et cetera. My family chooses to spend money on a college education; his family buys him Forno Bravos and top-notch ingredients. I don't think that my level of passion for pizza should be limited and determined by the financial means of me or my family.

Pizza Obsessives: Jimmy Coponi

I'm also 17 and have a passion for pizza making. Wait, scratch that, according to this cat, I'm an egotistical a-hole since I can't afford a WFO and di Bufala mozzarella. God forbid I use refrigeration! Please do not judge me and the other young kids out there who have limited budgets, unlimited imaginations, and a down-to-earth approach to things based only on this entitled brat.

Father's Day Giveaway: Win a KettlePizza Pro 22 Kit

Excited to make me pizza from scratch for my birthday. Puts dough in sealed container, explodes over entire kitchen.

Father's Day Giveaway: Win a Jumbo Cowboy Chop Steak

Caramelized onions

What was the first dish you called your own?

I think that each of us has a memory of a dish that was our first 'specialty'. We were able to replicate this culinary masterpiece time and time again, astounded at the deliciousness of our fine skills. I know that my first specialty dish was salsa and cheese dip. The complex recipe involved placing Velveeta cheese and Pace salsa in a small Pyrex bowl and nuking the mixture for exactly one minute on high. The resultant sauce was best enjoyed hot on tortilla chips. What was the first food or dish that you were proud to call your own, regardless of how simple it was to prepare?

What is your favorite shape of pasta or noodle?

I know, I know. People say that specific pasta shapes are supposed to be paired with different types of sauces, but most of us don't have enough space to store a full suite of pastas or noodles. If you had to choose only one variety of pasta or noodle to have in your pantry, what would it be? My vote is for fresh udon.

If you had to eat one nationality...

If you had to eat only the cuisine of one nationality for the rest of your life, what food would it be? I'm interested to see if people would gravitate towards 'traditional' French cooking or be willing to abandon their comforts in order to avoid boredom.

Permalink?

I have photos on my computer (taken by me) that I'd like to share on Photograzing, but an entry requires something called a permalink. I do not have a blog; I'm just a kid taking pictures of the stuff that I cook. To pass the required fields, I just typed in seriouseats.com as the permalink, but I assume my submission will be rejected. Is a valid blog really required? It seems non-intuitive...