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kwhit

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Title for a receipe book

"Riviting Recipes" - a la Rosie the Riveter. If you can use the picture, she could be holding a kitchen utensil. Or swap the head scarf for a chef hat.

Why didn't I think of that?

Any tricks NOT RELATED TO CHICKEN???

Healthy after work dinner?

5-minute, low-fat, fake-out Tortilla Soup: Take that rotisserie chicken and shred it. Add to canned tomato basil soup. Stir in red pepper flakes and garlic powder (S&P too). Nuke until hot. Add dollop of fat-free Greek yogurt for creaminess and top with crushed baked tortilla chips. If you have some cilantro - chop and add. Add Tabasco for more spice if desired. The spice and soup fill your belly for hours.

Healthy after work dinner?

Fake-out tortilla soup. Use that leftover rotisserie chicken and add shredded pieces to canned tomato basil soup. Add red pepper or hot sauce, garlic powder and some oregano. Nuke 2 minutes. The add dollop of greek yogurt for creaminess and crushed bakes tortilla chips. Low fat and super-satisfying. And QUICK!

Mike Isabella's Sweat - Please tell me I'm not alone

@Square Pie (if you get this. I've gotta wonder about a foodie without a TV - you're missing so much that I'm flummoxed at to why you'd even click on a TV post to begin with. As for restaurants, I just will disbelief. I admire your restraint - no TV and no restaurants. If only I could do the same with bad boyfriends and linen clothing.

Mike Isabella's Sweat - Please tell me I'm not alone

@LPhila - thanks for commiserating. As a Le Cordon Bleu Grad (i.e. $15K in debt to learn things I already knew), they would crucify us for double-dipping! But then, I haven't noticed many plastic tasting spoons in the Top Chef kitchens.

I guess the real question is: Antonia's sweat-free curried grouper or Mike's surf n' turf? REVAMPED QUERY:

Has anyone worked for a sweaty chef? Snotty chef? A less than ServSafe certified kitchen? Pray tell the good, the bad and the ugly.

Ramen Hacks: 30+ Easy Ways to Upgrade Your Instant Noodles

This recipe is an amalgam of my past post on Grown-Up Ramen. I took everyone's advice and honed this recipe. Great way to use odds and ends in your fridge - so forgiving!

Cook ramen with flavor packet (oriental is best; chicken second). Strain but reserve liquid. Then...

Saute garlic, grated ginger, any veggies on hand (carrot, snap peas, bok choy, onion, spinach, etc) with any meat on hand (pork, shrimp, chicken, even chopped lunch meat) in a nut-based oil (I like sesame).

Add Sriracha, soy or terryaki, lime juice,and (magic ingredient !) - peanut butter. Add seasoned broth as desired. Set aside/cover meat/veg mix.

Add oil to same pan - when screaming hot, add noodles and saute until crispy, flipping once to create a light brown noodle pancake. Top with meat mix, fresh scallions and any nuts on hand (even sunflower seeds work too) for crunch.

I've made my dad a fanatic - and he's hard to please. Try.

Ramen Hacks: 30+ Easy Ways to Upgrade Your Instant Noodles

This recipe is an amalgam of my past post on Grown-Up Ramen. I took everyone's advice and honed this recipe. Great way to use odds and ends in your fridge - so forgiving!

Cook ramen with flavor packet (oriental is best; chicken second). Strain but reserve liquid. Then...

Saute garlic, grated ginger, any veggies on hand (carrot, snap peas, bok choy, onion, spinach, etc) with any meat on hand (pork, shrimp, chicken, even chopped lunch meat) in a nut-based oil (I like sesame).

Add Sriracha, soy or terryaki, lime juice,and (magic ingredient !) - peanut butter. Add seasoned broth as desired. Set aside/cover meat/veg mix.

Add oil to same pan - when screaming hot, add noodles and saute until crispy, flipping once to create a light brown noodle pancake. Top with meat mix, fresh scallions and any nuts on hand (even sunflower seeds work too) for crunch.

I've made my dad a fanatic - and he's hard to please. Try.

Favorite food-related memoirs? (And ones to avoid)

@Cornelious - it's been a quite a while since I tried Steingarten, but if memory serves, I found the book lacked heart, or a compelling personal narrative. It was more encyclopedia-ish. But then again, to each (or eat!) his own. Maybe it was timing...the other posts have made me think I should try again.

Who amongst us, has the best pickiest eater story?

@gbania - in't and adventurous eater/vegetarian an oxymoron?

Your food budget

$50-60 average, but it's often painfully wasted. Being single, I throw out spoiled milk, withered cukes that I only had the need to use half of (and those Green Bags are rip-offs), etc.

Maybe it's my V-Day Grinch rearing it's ugly head, but I would spend so much less if there was a way to buy single weekly servings of fruit/produce. Example: I want Clementines but know that buying a crate will lead half to spoil.

I did have it down to $20/week in college: cereal for breakfast; hummus w/pita and a banana for lunch and a pre-made pizza bagel for dinner. Looking back, I'm shocked I didn't lose weight, but the keggers probably made up the difference :)

I thought I had it figured out when I filled a container of pre-chopped stuff at the salad bar (cukes, peppers and the like) to add to salads, but it always gets soggy by Wednesday.

Favorite food-related memoirs? (And ones to avoid)

Thanks so far - email this thread to your foodie friends b/c I think it will make for lively discussion!

@ AnnieNT - Am currently reading My Life in France but am sad to say that the Julie/Julia phenomenon has ruined it a bit to me - I can only picture Meryl Streep and compare it to the book/movie (unintentionally).

@lemons - Have a trepidation re: MLK Fisher - somehow got the assumption (probably incorrect) that her books were overly atmospheric and elitist. Again, unintentional but it's what I absorbed. Maybe that's info from folks who didn't get past the hard going at first (unlike you)....I'll give it a whirl!

I'll be on Amazon momentarily with these suggestions, but please check out Ruth Reichl's stuff. The book where she talks about being the NY Times food critic (complete with disguises galore) is fantastic.

Travelers: What's Your Favorite Airport Food?

Since I've been telling this story for 10 years, I guess it counts as a best airport restaurant experience. Burger King, Bangkok Airport, 2001:
Me: "2 burgers and 2 beers (yeah! on the availability of the latter) please."
Cashier: "Where you from?"
Me: "The States"
Cashier: "Oh! Do you have Burger King there?"

Travelers: What's Your Favorite Airport Food?

Since I've been telling this story for 10 years, I guess it counts as a best airport restaurant experience. Bangkok Airport, 2001:
Me: "2 burgers and 2 beers (yeah! on the latter) please."
Cashier: "Where you from?"
Me: "The States"
Cashier: "Oh! Do you have Burger King there?"

Travelers: What's Your Favorite Airport Food?

Philadelphia has a decent variety, which takes some sting out of the fact that they always lose your luggage on international connections.

Whatever you want, what would you eat right now?

Reuben with a huge dill pickle and house-made potato chips.

Thoughts on sharing recipes?

I'm sorry - unless you're a restaurant chef and the "asker" is your competition, or you're submitting something to a Pillbury competition, who cares? I'm happy to share, but I usually guess on amounts because I rarely measure ingredients (why I don't bake). Only talented cooks could do them any justice, and I think it's great when they spin them a bit anyway. WHAT'S THE BIG DEAL?
Like Carla from Top Chef would say, the secret ingredient is love :)

Looks good,I wanna like it,keep trying it,but it never satisfies

Spanish Food - all of it. I've been to swanky places and hole-in-the-walls to try and like it, but I always leave feeling like it's Mexican food without any spice. BLAND!

What Talk thread title do you never want to see on SE?

@ simon - what's wrong with asking how to season a cast iron pan? That answer smacks of pretentiousness.
When I got one, I didn't know how to treat it (the guy at Bed, Bath & Beyond wasn't exactly a wealth of knowledge). I just heard great things about them and I wanted to use my expensive (and darn heavy) investment appropriately. I didn't post a question on SE, but I did utilize the Internet to find my answer.
BTW, I'm a Le Cordon Bleu grad and my $15K tuition didn't cover cast iron cooking. There is NOTHING wrong with wanting to use your cooking materials correctly.

What Talk thread title do you never want to see on SE?

@ simon - what's wrong with asking how to season a cast iron pan? That answer smacks of pretentiousness.
When I got one, I didn't know how to treat it (the guy at Bed, Bath & Beyond wasn't exactly a wealth of knowledge). I just heard great things about them and I wanted to use my expensive (and darn heavy) investment appropriately. I didn't post a question on SE, but I did utilize the Internet to find my answer.
BTW, I'm a Le Cordon Bleu grad and my $15K tuition didn't cover cast iron cooking. There is NOTHING wrong with wanting to use your cooking materials correctly.

Grown-Up Ramen Noodles?

If anyone is still reading, I'm the first poster and thank you for putting me in Ramen HEAVEN! Nuked the chicken flavor (with spice pack) to al dente (appx 2 min) while I sauteed hot pepper, garlic, bok choy and leftover pork with sriracha, rice vinegar and sesame oil (and a little soy). Drained pasta and tossed into pan; topped with chopped peanuts and I'm SO HAPPY!!! Just sad I was out of eggs. I saved the broth - drizzled some onto the noodles but mostly drinking it like the yummy sodium-laced gift it is! :) Hey - it's the weekend (so there's also a beer chaser with all of the above).

Grown-Up Ramen Noodles?

Thanks for all the great comments (except for the random haters - next time I'll say "jazzed up" to avoid your snotty comments) - I just ripped some meat off of leftover ribs and chopped up some baby bok choy for an enhancement. Sriracha and sesame oil on hand - wish me luck!

If salt/pepper were a given, what would be your one other spice?

Answers.com says garlic BOTH a veggie and an herb, so I'll pick that if possible. But if that's breaking the rules, does red/cayenne pepper count since they are still pepper? Otherwise, choice #3 is Italian Seasoning since it's so versatile.

Stocking the pantry - what are the bare essentials?

I hate to bake, so that saves me some space. I agree with most folks, but in a new house you'll be shocked at home much you'll be "eating" your paint, cleaning supplies and other surprises (furnace filters anyone?), so my advice is more about making smart choices with food dollars because paint thinner, rakes, shovels and bathmats aren't very tasty :).

Rachael Ray's cookbooks usually have a great list of pantry staples in them. HINT: Don't buy the book, just take a picture of the list with your phone and email it to yourself.

FREEZE AWAY! Nuts - keep them in your freezer for longer life. Same for fresh ginger when you don't use it all. People also forget that cheese can be frozen (like when there are bo-gos on shredded bags).

SOUP! Tke advantage of sales! Three been chili with beef (decent brand like Progresso - not scary Hormel) over rice with some shredded cheese can be great (if you doll it up with some spices). Or add shredded Rotisserie chicken to Tomato Basil with some salsa and tortilla chips - Tortilla soup! You can also doctor up veggie soup with any leftover meat you have from other meals (and those canned beans/rice/pasta).

Splurge for the resealable broth cartons so you don't have the annoying leftover half-can (although if you do - freeze that in baggies - they don't take up as much room that way).

Trust me - home ownership is a Pandora's box of unexpected expenses, and a carpet you can live with lasts way longer than dinner.

Bethlehem, PA: Emeril's Burgers and More Will Leave You Wanting More

Thanks JoeFood - I just logged in to say the same thing. Who writes this? Do they have a map? It's closer to Philly and NYC if anything.

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