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kuriouskitteh

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  • Favorite foods: lush, ripe fruits, chocolate, pasta, oven-roasted tomatoes, indian cuisine, fresh-tasting things, good oriental cuisine, breads, cheeses, things with tomato sauces, desserts, asian bakery items...
  • Last bite on earth: probably wouldn't be a food, actually, but more of a metaphoric bite?

Japanese Curry Rice

Yes! I've been looking forward to this post, thanks!

~Kurious Kitteh

Sunday Brunch: Bannocks

Ah, I Capture the Castle! These remind me of the "biscuits" Topaz makes. Nice book, and nice post =).

~Kurious Kitteh

Growing herbs indoors - advice?

I've been thinking of trying this too. Thanks everyone, this thread has taught me lots!
Good luck!

~Kurious Kitteh

Photo of the Day: Hard Boiled Egg Chicken Family

Cakespy: An Educaketion

Ahah, I like your relation of this cake to An Education =). Hadn't heard of Battenberg before, your cake looks beautiful! The idea is intriguing, thanks for opening my eyes to it!

~Kurious Kitteh

The Food Lab: Is Good Pizza Really All About the Water?

As a Psych student, I am in love with your methods, and admire your dedication to this experiment.
Also, that's a smart woman you've got there ;).

Chow Mein Chocolates

I received something similar to these for Christmas from a friend whose mom has, surprise surprise, been making them for years. Hers included peanuts, mmm. I love the crunchy texture, thanks for sharing

kuriouskitteh hasn't written a post yet.

How to Make Rummy Bears and Other Drunken Gummies

Do you remember hearing last year about the kids getting drunk in class on vodka-soaked Gummi Bears? It was a real problem in some schools, especially in parts of California, where bear-boozled kids were sent home. We're not endorsing this illicit activity; kids, stay in school. But if you're of age, want to eat Gummi Bears and drink alcohol at the same time, then keep reading. Bring these to a party and you'll be everyone's hero. More

Pizza Protips: Converting Dough Recipes to Hand Kneading

If you've found an intriguing recipe that requires a food processor or stand mixer, you can convert that recipe to hand kneading without too much trouble. The first thing that changes is the amount of time it will take to knead the dough enough to properly develop the gluten. You'll also need the change the order in which you incorporate ingredients. More

Bacon-Bourbon Jam

Adapted from Everyday Food. The taste of this jam is truly outrageous. Each bite contains layer upon layer of flavor, from the caramelized onions and garlic; to the sweet bourbon and maple syrup; to the smoky, salty, porky bacon. Try... More

4 Tips for Buying Great Cheese on a Budget

There is more great cheese available to Americans than ever before, but a lot of it is expensive. Very expensive, as you all pointed out in my last column on shopping for cheese. Here are four simple tips for the cheese enthusiast on a budget. Did you know the fresh chevre made for the Trader Joe's in-house label comes from Laura Chenel, one of the pioneera of the contemporary American hand-crafted cheesemaking movement? More

Wok Skills 101: How to Deep Fry at Home

I'd be willing to wager that anyone who complains how difficult and messy it is to deep-fry at home has never tried deep-frying in a wok. Why don't people fry at home? The most common answers are: it's messy, it's expensive ("What do I do with all the leftover oil?"), and it's unhealthy. Well a wok can certainly help solve your first two problems. You're on your own for the third. This is our second piece in this week's Wok Skills 101 series. More

How To Make Tortillas

I'm not going to lie. Making fresh corn tortillas is more time-consuming and difficult than using storebought. And if you live in the right area, the storebought kind can actually be pretty good. That said, they don't come close to the intense corn flavor and pillowy, steamy softness of a fresh, handmade tortilla fresh off the comal (or the nonstick griddle, as the case may be), and they really aren't that hard to make. More

Cook Your Meat in a Beer Cooler: The World's Best (and Cheapest) Sous-Vide Hack

By this point, there is absolutely no question that the method of cooking foods at precise low-temperatures in vacuum-sealed pouches (commonly referred to as "sous-vide") has revolutionized fine-dining kitchens around the world. But the question of when this technique will trickle down to home users—and it certainly is a question of when, and not if—remains to be answered. The Sous-Vide Supreme is certainly a big step in the right direction. But at $450, for most people, it still remains prohibitively costly. In an effort to help those who'd like to experiment with sous-vide cookery without having to put in the capital, a couple weeks ago I devised a novel solution to the problem: cook your food in a beer cooler. I put the hack method head-to-head against the Sous-Vide Supreme. More

How to Make Compound Butter

There's nothing like a pat of butter melting away on top of something you're about to sink your teeth into. And when you add a few flavorful ingredients to it, you've got compound butter. Making compound butter is an easy and practical way of layering on buttery goodness along with fresh herbs, aromatic spices, a little kick, or a hint of sweetness. More

How to Make Fresh Pasta

Fresh pasta is made from a few simple ingredients, using a straightforward method. But getting it just right requires some coaching, a lot of practice, and a few good tips. This primer from expert pasta-making chef Anna Klinger of Al Di La in Brooklyn can help get you started or put you back on track, and inspire you to make this recipe for casunsiei (beet and ricotta ravioli). More

Growing herbs indoors - advice?

Hello lovely Eaters, My neighbors' basements have stopped flooding and, as I look out the window, I see sunlight - spring is coming! I am curious about the feasibility of growing some herbs indoors, as I am an apartment-dweller without... More

The Food Lab: Slicing Meat Against the Grain

Can you spot the difference between the two hanger steaks? They were both cooked to a perfect 130°F medium-rare in the same pan, both cut from the same piece of meat, and both sport a beautiful brown, crackly crust. Yet one of them is more tender than Otis Redding on a good day, while the other has more in common with a rubber band. What's the difference? It's all got to do with the angle at which it's sliced. More

Pizza Girl: Future Technology

Once upon a time, there was no GPS. This was before the "delivery fee" was even a twinkle in the Noid's eye. Cellphones were built like bricks, and pizza delivery dudes were all dudes. And in this land of my pizza-delivery forbears, drivers carried maps made of trees but most carried maps in their heads. I have no idea what technologies are to come and make delivery better, but here are some of my ideas (far-fetched or not) that would be cool. More