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quarter twist!

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Bacon, Cheese, and Scallion Waffles

Italian sausage and cherry peppers, maybe with an italian hard cheese I can't decide.

Where Do You Eat Alone in New York?

Han Dynasty. I like to order a mapo dofu and a dan dan noodles, eat half of them, and take home the rest.

Seriously Delicious Holiday Giveaway: Korin Knife

Cilantro! I don't even care how late it is I'm about to do it anyway.

Ever Made Anything "Healthier" That Was Actually Good?

I too (apparently I inspired this thread, go me!) use greek yogurt when making tuna salad and I think it is excellent. Sometimes you really want to taste fat and therefore full fat mayo is the way to go, but if it's a lighter experience you seek then lite mayo mixed with greek yogurt is the bomb.com.

Best Cooler for Sous Vide

Thermos Nissan 48 oz. Wide Mouth Thermos, a little under 30 dollars on Amazon at any given time. You can fit a lot of stuff in there so if I'm cooking for just one or two people I can usually get away with just using that. You will of course have to bend the steak a little to get it in and you need to be a little careful when vacuum sealing things to make sure they end up in a shape that can get in there, but overall it's how I've done my best sous vide cooking.

Best Cooler for Sous Vide

When I cook just a single steak or something I use a wide mouth thermos. Naturally the thermos holds its temperature better than just about any cooler. For bigger cuts of meat though, and also burgers because they need to hold their shape, I want more room but I favor a smaller cooler just because it's easier to store and not as big a pain to fill up with the right temperature water.

Photo of the Day: RAMPS!!!

How well do you think they'd hold up if I vacuum sealed them and froze them? I want a freaking million of them to enjoy all year.

It's Time to Make Cold-Brewed Coffee!

I was just talking to someone about cold-brew an hour ago. I was wondering if there were any virtues to brewing the coffee at a slightly higher temperature, like 100-110 degrees, and keeping it that way in a thermos overnight. You could keep the grounds suspended in a cheesecloth by putting the top through the grooves of the thermos cap and screwing it in, which would inhibit heat retention a little but this is 'cold' brewing after all. I figure that temperature would have some of the virtues of cold brew like the lower acidity, but might get a little more flavor out of the beans. Raw food vegans usually consider their food still raw until somewhere in the 110s, so if it's still raw, is it still cold?

It's Time to Make Cold-Brewed Coffee!

I was just talking to someone about cold-brew an hour ago. I was wondering if there were any virtues to brewing the coffee at a slightly higher temperature, like 100-110 degrees, and keeping it that way in a thermos overnight. You could keep the grounds suspended in a cheesecloth by putting the top through the grooves of the thermos cap and screwing it in, which would inhibit heat retention a little but this is 'cold' brewing after all. I figure that temperature would have some of the virtues of cold brew like the lower acidity, but might get a little more flavor out of the beans. Raw food vegans usually consider their food still raw until somewhere in the 110s, so if it's still raw, is it still cold?

What's Your Hangover Cure?

Fried dumplings. The grease, the salt, the carbs... good for what ails you.

Gimme Your Burger Lab Requests!

I accidentally posted before my second idea: I recently had the Craigie burger and it was like the best thing that has ever happened to me. How about a DIY version with all equipment the ordinary cook would have? Seems tricky given all the awesome gear they use to cook that burger but if anyone can do it I feel you can.

Gimme Your Burger Lab Requests!

Two ideas:

I have an outrageous request. Before I started reading your columns, I used to work a lot of stuff into the meat of my burgers. I'd fold salt, pepper, garlic, herbs, even a little grated onion into the meat, totally overworking the meat in the process. Thanks to you I now know better, and I'm really really grateful, but occasionally I miss burgers that have all that stuff in them. However, I'm unwilling to go back to the bad old days on meat texture because, really, burgers are about beef. So I want you to do the impossible and break one of your own rules: How to work foreign ingredients evenly into the meat without overworking it and making it dense and puck-like. An additional restriction: Without a meat grinder cause I ain't got one. If you say this is impossible I will take your word for it, because when it comes to burgers I basically regard you as the Supreme Court, so I humbly request you make like the Supreme Court, and interpret the constitution!

The Food Lab: How to Make Tonkotsu Ramen Broth at Home

Yo Kenji! I have a pressure cooker question: Why not just do both? I had a couple chicken carcasses a couple weeks ago and I did them up in the pressure cooker (with some other stuff one would want to make a western broth with) and it turned the chicken carcasses into toothpicks. After about an hour I took them out of the cooker and simmered them in a stockpot for eight hours, skimming and straining. It was the best broth I ever made!

How do we feel about turkey bacon?

Well let me put it this way: Could you enjoy it as a food if you weren't comparing it directly to bacon? No one disputes that real bacon is way better, but as someone here pointed out, turkey bacon is called bacon somewhat erroneously. Turkey bacon is of course processed dark turkey meat, pressed into bacon-shaped slices. There is something inherently gross about this and it does look sort of like a dog treat, but I would argue that it's not actually a bad tasting food, and it has a good texture if you fry it and then give it a little time in the oven.

So how about this: As a bacon substitute, not so good. As a sandwich meat or topping, not too bad?

Got a Question for The Food Lab? Kenji Will Answer Everything

A lot of Indian recipes want me to put spices in the cooking oil to 'bring out the flavor.' But hold up! Aren't the particles that flavor these spices super volatile? By tossing them in at the very beginning of the cooking process won't I have severely diminished or destroyed their flavor by the time I serve? Or is this only the case for ground spices, and whole spices can take way more punishment? I gotta know!

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