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hunrgy

Win a Copy of 'Baked Occasions'

Chocolate mousse

Dim Sum Classics: How to Make The Silkiest, Most Comforting Congee With Ground Pork and Corn

Sliced fish is my favorite but salted pork and century egg is also up there for me.

How I Built a Barbecue Restaurant in Brooklyn: My Lease Safari

I really enjoyed this. It puts into perspective the hardships of opening a restaurant, especially in NYC. As others have already said, I hope this is a series of posts to come.

Does Seasoning in Stages Make a Difference?

You mentioned that the taste of the soups were no different but what about the texture of the vegetables? Were the veggies in the pot with salt as you go more broken down than the soup with salt at the end?

The Best Chinese Bakery Sweets in Manhattan's Chinatown

Oooh, I really hope there's a savory version too!!

Chinese Noodles 101: Crispy Pan-Fried Noodle Cakes With Seafood

Oh wow! This screams childhood memories for me. Now I know I've been doing this wrong all along. Thanks for the recipe. I'll definitely try it out.

The Best Lunch Spots in Hell's Kitchen

Kung Fu Little Steamed Buns for Shanghainese food
Hell's Chicken for Korean fried chicken

Staff Picks: What's Your Least Favorite Dessert?

I agree with the floral desserts plus Indian desserts. The one exception is kulfi which is like an Indian ice cream.

Cook the Book: 'Spain' by Jeff Koehler

Simple anchovies on bread

The Vegan Experience: How to Cook Crispy Tofu Worth Eating

I know my method is not vegan but I use a mixture of corn starch and egg whites for my wet batter. Light and crispy!

Cook the Book: 'Daniel: My French Cuisine' by Daniel Boulud

Soup dumplings

Chocolate Pot de Creme

Oh man, I wish I had this recipe a few days ago. I used a bunch of eggs just for the white and didn't know what to do with the yolks. This would be a perfect ending to the meal I just had.

The Complete 2013 Serious Eats Guide To Turkeys

@Kenji Nevermind. I clicked through the slideshow then the actual recipe and found it. Tented 20 minutes. Thanks again.

The Complete 2013 Serious Eats Guide To Turkeys

@Kenji Thanks again. Sorry one more questions. I just reread your spatchcock post again. I don't think you mentioned resting. But does a spatchcocked cooked turkey need to rest as long as a un-spatchcocked turkey? 30-60 minutes?

The Complete 2013 Serious Eats Guide To Turkeys

Kenji, thanks for this post. I'm really interested in spatchcocking my turkey this year. I never present it at my table whole anyway. Carving tableside is a chore in my family. I break it down easily on my cutting board in the kitchen and present it on a platter similar to yours. Anyway, the start of my question is: I normally wrap my whole un-spatchcocked turkey in bacon. It self bastes as it cooks in the oven. The bacon will cook through before the turkey is done. So I remove that layer then wrap a second one around the turkey. The bacon is removed again when cooked. I leave the turkey bare for the last moments for the skin to crisp up. And here's the question, would I be able to bacon wrap a spatchcocked turkey, twice? It's become traditional for family members to eat the cooked bacon throughout the day as I'm preparing the feast for supper.

Thanks again for this post.

Cull & Pistol Nails the Classics and Creates Some New Ones

This looks really great.

Dim Sum at Pacificana in Sunset Park: Dumplings With a Side of Glamor

@maxfalkowitz The platter should also include pickled vegetables like carrot and daikon.

Dim Sum at Pacificana in Sunset Park: Dumplings With a Side of Glamor

@maxfalkowitz Ah that explains why the dish was cold. This dish is usually served at dinner as appetizer platter. It involves cold cuts, roasted pig, and jellyfish. But I'm with you when it comes to cold vs hot roasted pork. I prefer the latter.

Dim Sum at Pacificana in Sunset Park: Dumplings With a Side of Glamor

Is there something else under that pork skin besides pork meat? Towards the far end of the plate in the picture. Jellyfish?

Open Thread: What Do You Want to Know this Thanksgiving?

I'm also on the sweet potato questions bandwagon. No mashed. No pie. I can roast them but that seem boring since everything else is roasted. I thought maybe sweet potato croquettes with cheese and panko bread crumbs.

For those looking for interesting bread, I do homemade garlic bread.

For those looking for another side dish, and vegetarian: I do a corn souffle which goes over really well.

For those looking to do another main dish besides turkey/ham: salt baked fish. It's a show stopper. I will be doing it for Christmas this year.

Cook the Book: Andy Ricker's 'Pok Pok'

My favorite Thai dish changed to Phat Thai Kung Sot after eating at Phat Thai Pok Pok. It opened my eyes to Thai food.

Ask the Critic: What Are Some Alternatives to NYC Tourist Traps?

I'm surprised that a tourist is willing to wait in that line for a cronut.

Behind the Scenes: How Prosciutto di Parma is Made

Mmm mmm, one of my favorite hams of all time.

Staff Picks: What's the Scariest Food You've Ever Eaten?

Hasma: frog fallopian tubes

Chinese Egg Tarts

I have individual silicone cups. Would the baking time and/or temp change for those?

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Traditional Beef Pho

There are few things better for the soul or the body than a tangle of slick rice noodles in a rich, crystal clear, intensely beefy broth; the warm aroma of cinnamon, cloves, and star anise rising up in a cloud of steam. The intensely savory-salty hint of fish sauce balanced by a squeeze of lime juice and a handful of fresh herbs and chilies that you add to your bowl as you eat. Here's how to make it at home. More

Video: How to Cook a Spatchcock Turkey (the Fastest, Easiest, Best Way to Cook a Thanksgiving Bird)

Spatchcocking delivers breast meat juicier than a standard roast turkey, leg meat more tender than a standard roast turkey, and skin that's so crisp it literally shatters when you poke it, all in about half the time it takes to roast a conventional turkey. A perfect Thanksgiving bird on the table in under 90 minutes? Watch the video to see how it's done. More

Debunking Thai Food Myths With Pok Pok's Andy Ricker

This week marks the release of the Pok Pok cookbook, Andy Ricker's beautifully designed, deeply personal, and entertainingly educational ode to Thai cuisine. We spoke to the chef about six of the most common misconceptions about Thai food to encourage home cooks to pick up a mortar and pestle and start pounding. More