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heddylamar

What do you guys prefer plastic or wooden

Thin flexi-plastic boards that go in the dishwasher.

When Breakfast Gets "Weird"

I prefer savory in the a.m. Leftover Thai, dal, spicy soups, apple & cheese ... and my normal looking, but not smelling oatmeal with an egg stirred in spiked with sesame oil, soy sauce and red pepper paste (plus fresh greens, if I have those on hand).

Deviled eggs

Coleman's mustard, sriracha and salt.

How do you like your hummus?

I never make it exactly the same twice, but always have tahini, garlic, lemon and a bit of oil. For oil, I skim the oil off the top of the tahini (I don't mix it in) to use in place of olive oil.

Add-ins vary: cilantro, chili peppers, roasted peppers and almost always a sprinkle of Harissa, za'atar or cayenne.

Culinary land mines

Northofboston -- those are the exact variety of B&B pickles I like. I add habaneros, Mom uses red pepper. I'll have to try the Thai chilis with this summer's batch.

Traveling Mac and Cheese questions

I've done this successfully several times. Tipsykit37's recommendations are spot on (though, I would never use American cheese :))

- thinner sauce
- less cooked pasta (8 min. v. 10)
- more liquid béchamel

Elbows have worked fine for me.

To transport, I drop the dish into a larger container lined with hot towels. Cover the whole thing with another hot towel, and it will still be warm 30-49 minutes later.

Culinary land mines

- Slimy greens, unintentional, I hope.
- Parsley, any.
- Candy-sweet salad dressings. Vinaigrettes should contain some vinegar. (I am not talking about the fruit vinaigrettes, rather savory-described varieties).

And to continue a theme, overly-sweet bread and butter pickles. I grew up on homemade B&B pickles with some spice, like Wickles. The sweet commercial variety are atrocious.

Work Pot Luck

If you are interested in making something (almost) everyone can eat, my tactic is to make a gluten free vegan dish. I've brought chili (Kenji's vegan version), daals, salads, tamale pie, quinoa dishes and tofu/tempeh-based dishes.

Another Where to Eat: Waikiki

Maliboomer -- we're from Maryland/DC metro.

NY vs. DC for a Californian

The dining options right around GWU are not the best DC has to offer. But if you were living in the U Street corridor or in the H Street area, there's quite a few good dining options from Ethiopian to decent bar food.

summer rolls - how much ahead of time can they be made?

I've use AnnieNT's method successfully several times. Kept like that, any leftover rolls can survive 24 hours. I wouldn't serve to guests after 24 hours of storage, but that's fine for myself.

Tamales...warning rant follows

I agree with Bittman's "They're definitely not a quick weeknight preparation."

It's not that tamales are complicated, but between cooking the filling (I don't use a plain masa filling), assembly and then steaming, tamales are a 2 hour process. I simply don't have time for that on weeknights.

Behind the Scenes in Maggie's Home Kitchen (and Bar)

I really like the liquor cabinet. I'm going to incorporate some of your organization into our new home. Plus Talisker Storm!

How much do you tip for online food delivery?

I feel I need to clarify my original statement lest anyone think me a cheapskate!

Our order are normally under $20; I tip at least $5. That's a 25% tip.

Cast Iron question.

Yes, just like with any pan, you should use oil when cooking.

How much do you tip for online food delivery?

Do you mean ordered online and delivered to my front door the same day? In that case, tipping starts with a minimum of $5 or 15% if the order's over $30.

Delivering in inclement weather always earns a few more dollars.

Cast Iron question.

Someone else will have to speak to using grapeseed oil for seasoning. I have only ever used vegetable oil.

As for the rust spots, those look like the result of not thoroughly drying the pan. How are you drying the pan after cleaning? Check out this tutorial.

After cleaning and drying, wipe with flaxseed oil.

For more scientific reading on the subject, check out this blog post.

Chipotle Introduces New Vegan Burritos and Tacos Across the Country

Expecting to be less than impressed, chipotle's sofritas were a rather pleasant surprise. My experience was spicy, slightly chewy, and rather in-depth flavor ... for tofu. Again, it was a surprise.

I didn't try the sofritas with a bunch of stuff -- just salsa and tortilla. A second try with beans was less satisfactory, though still good in the sofritas and salsa bites.

I can easily see how the dish could become too chewy.

Ideas for egglant puree other than baba ghanoush

Baingan bharta is an Indian eggplant and tomato dish. There's a pretty simple recipe here on SE by Nick.

jr0717 reminded me of Kenji's rabe and caponata recipe too.

Ideas for egglant puree other than baba ghanoush

Was it made from roasted eggplant? If so, what about baingan bharta?

savory or sweet breakfast?

Savory. My favorite is a leftover spicy dal with greens, eaten cold.

Anyone else over the love affair with all things Asian-inspired?

@Ananonnie I see now that Beyond Curry is still running, at a painfully infrequent pace. I'll have to keep an eye out.

Anyone else over the love affair with all things Asian-inspired?

I really miss the Indian recipe columnist. She had some fantastic recipes.

Another Where to Eat: Waikiki

@kathryn great resources, thanks! I travel quite a bit, so I am aware of the limitations. While I'd love good vegetarian meals everywhere, new (to me) fruits, vegetables, etc are always welcome.

How to Make Great Vegan Ice Cream

Thanks for the tips Max. I've been abstaining from ice cream lately, since none of the dairy-free I've tried has been particularly good. I've been spoiled y Jeni's and some really good homemade dairy-laden ice creams.

Another Where to Eat: Waikiki

Scenario: Vegetarian and vegetarian-leaning omnivore (aka no great big slabs of meat), spending part of trip with mixed group of omnivores.
Dislikes: no fryer-heavy, all blonde-toned meals.
Likes: adventurous, spicy, sour ... tend toward Ethiopian, Asian, Indian, Middle Eastern, Spanish, Mexican, good pizza.

The two main players want something they're not likely to find in the continental U.S.: Hawaiian cuisine? Good seafood (not shellfish) or sushi for the omnivore? Does Hawaii have a Hindu or Malaysian influx? Restaurants?

Jalapeño Jelly from 'Little Jars, Big Flavors'

I am not usually one for "semi-homemade" anything, but I take exception for one of the best hors d'oeurves of all time: store-bought pepper jelly slathered atop a block of cream cheese. The spicy sweetness of the jelly is a perfect match for the cool and tangy cheese, and it spreads gracefully atop many a cracker. But I'm willing to class up my act with some homemade jelly, and this verdant jalapeño and green bell pepper recipe from Southern Living's Little Jars, Big Flavors works even better than my usual grocery store grab. More

Raspberry Rhubarb Ginger Jam

Crystallized ginger melts into this tart raspberry-rhubarb jam, providing unexpected hints of heat and spice. The flavors are big and bold, so it would work best with straightforward baked goods that won't compete. More

Negroni Variations: 4 Recipes from Fiola in Washington, DC

Jeff Faile has crafted an evolving list of Negroni-inspired cocktails that occupies an entire page of Fiola's cocktail menu. Currently clocking in at six, the list includes a Negroni based on pisco, a clear version with Cocchi Americano and Dolin Blanc, and a richer one made with Barolo Chinato and Old Tom Gin. Each variation exposes new flavor possibilities for the drink. Lucky for you, we got the recipes for 4 favorites. More

Kale Greens in Coconut Milk from 'The Adobo Road Cookbook'

Kale salads and sauteed greens with chile flakes only go so far to satisfy my curious cravings, so I'm always looking for a new way to get my fix. Marvin Gapultos's recipe for Kale Greens in Coconut Milk is just the ticket: the greens are given a long-ish simmer in a potent mixture of thick coconut milk, shrimp paste, shrimp stock, and Thai chiles, emerging supple and succulent. More

Parsnip Muffins

These muffins get a little whole wheat flour and brown butter for nuttiness, plus a handful of dried cranberries to balance the sweetness. The parsnips are grated very roughly so they are only just cooked through and slightly crunchy, quite the opposite of hiding the vegetable. More

Green Herb and Kidney Bean Stew (Ghormeh Sabzi) from 'The New Persian Kitchen'

Herb stew sounds like one of those "recipes" I'd come up with as a kid poking around in the garden for kitchen experiments. After all, in Western cuisine, fresh herbs are usually added at the end of cooking for a burst of greenery and bright flavor. But according to Lousia Shafia, author of The New Persian Kitchen, herb-filled stews are some of the most famous in Iran. Her version is a lighter, vegetarian take on the green stew, filled with cubes of turmeric-laced tofu and fat red kidney beans. More

First Look: The Rye Bar, Washington DC

The Rye Bar has roughly a dozen ryes behind the 26-seat bar at any given time. Classic rye cocktails on the list get subtle twists: the Old(er) Fashioned uses an aged sherry instead of sugar, and the Manhattan, made with Dad's Hat Pennsylvania rye, Dolin sweet vermouth, Byrrh Quinquina, and housemade orange bitters, is aged in a 15 gallon barrel for six weeks to impart a subtle oaky funkiness that's proven to be extremely popular (Beverage director Will Rentschler went through his first batch of 250 Manhattans in a week). More

Make-Ahead Radish Fattoush Salad

If fattoush salad is not in your regular culinary vocabulary, add it in now. This Mediterranean bread salad is crunchy, fresh, colorful, and, like most good Mediterranean foods, stunningly good in its simplicity. Lucky you, this lunch hour! More