Profile

glightly

I eat, cook, and shoot in Beijing.

  • Location: Beijing, China
  • Favorite foods: seared scallops, yunnan ham stir fried with dried pine mushrooms, glutinous rice products, mission burritos, pie, bi-rite ice cream, chirashi rice with uni, cobb salad, cold-brewed coffee, cold korean noodles, fried chicken, tonkatsu curry
  • Last bite on earth: plate of hog island oysters; assorted dim sum; cantonese barbequed duck, goose, honey pork, and chicken over rice; bowl of wonton noodles; glutinous rice balls and tofu flower in ginger syrup with soft boiled peanuts

A Tour Inside of Tokyo's Tsukiji, The World's Largest Fish Market

Extremely sad that the inner market is going to move. Have always loved the outer market and I think it's also one of the few Tokyo outposts of the Kyoto knife maker Aritsugu.

Incidentally, in the last slide, I think the correct Japanese would be just "Oishii," unless it was supposed to be "oishii desu ne," and was cut off.

Terrific Liang Pi and Biang Biang Noodles at Philly's Xi'an Sizzling Woks

Wow, it's very exciting how northern Chinese food has become so widespread in the last few years.

A small correction, though -- dapanji is a sinified Uighur dish of pretty recent invention, originating in Xinjiang.

Open Thread: What's One Food You Wish You Liked?

Donuts :-( They always seem really one note to me.

Also, congealed blood (sausage is OK) -- I love the texture, just can't get over my squeamishness.

Meet and Eat: Ari Rudess, Serious Eats Intern

Please, serious eats, just say no to the marketing-speak of "handcrafted."

The Food Lab: The Best Wonton Soup

Sorry to be so pedantic, but JInhua is a city in Zhejiang province.

Bake the Book: La Boulange Bakery: Cafe Cooking At Home

conveniently leaves out that this bakery is now owned by starbucks.

Do You Compost Your Food Scraps?

In San Francisco it is very simple to compost, a matter of throwing compostable waste (including food soiled cardboard boxes) into a small kitchen bin and then into the larger compost bin to be wheeled out onto the curb. Our landfill garbage is reduced to practically nothing. Recycling and composting laws keep 80& of the city's garbage out of landfills; in most other cities it's only 35%. On top of that there are pickup locations to get high quality compost after the city has processed it for urban gardens. It's a win win situation.

Your bestest Quinoa recipe

My favorite quinoa recipe is loosely adapted from the one palatable dish I've ever had at Cafe Gratitude: quinoa as a base for green vegetable curry, with half an avocado on top. It's actually much more delicious than with rice.

Cook the Book: 'Every Grain of Rice'

the guizhou specialty of deep fried glutinous rice balls stir fried with preserved mustard greens.

Coffee Drinks: Yuangyang, Hong Kong Coffee-Tea

Also -- HK style milk tea is a totally different beast. It's practically boiled and intensely steeped before being finely strained. They almost never use fresh milk; it's usually evaporated milk.

Coffee Drinks: Yuangyang, Hong Kong Coffee-Tea

The romanization of this is incorrect -- it's yuanyang, and maybe it has something to do with the coloration of the ducks, but it's more of a reference to an odd couple/pairing. Wikipedia is a friend.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandarin_Duck
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuanyang_%28drink%29

Serious Entertaining: A Dorm Room Dinner

I actually checked the date because I wasn't sure if this was an april fool's joke.

Sandwiched: Paté and Tater Tots

College Tours: Where to Eat Near U.C. Berkeley

Also, ici for ice cream.

College Tours: Where to Eat Near U.C. Berkeley

The izakaya Ippuku is excellent and really close to campus.

Also, all the Korean places... Tofu House, etc.

Grilling: Fish in Parchment

I'm sorry to be so pedantic and writing this in a fit of pique, but it pains me to see such mistakes on a beloved food site, which often PIQUES my interest in novel cooking methods, such as grilling in parchment.

21+ Ways to Upgrade Your Grilled Cheese

gruyere, dates, and bacon on olive bread. does that still count as a grilled cheese sandwich?

Have You Ever Had Airline Food You Actually Liked?

Once I had an oddly delicious tomato sauce and bowtie entree on American (a year ago). It was simple, simple, simple, but good.

Cathay Pacific is hit or miss. I had an amazing seafood congee one time, with slivers of ginger that made it seem really fresh, and sometimes on their affiliate Dragonair I've also had good meals. And sometimes it is downright disastrous: rubbery dim sum and whatnot.

Seriously Asian: Bitter Melon

I like bitter melon stir fried with salted duck egg! For some reason it's palatable and even delicious then.

The worst, in my opinion, is bitter melon and pork neck soup. It definitely feels like it should be good for you.

Seriously Asian: Lotus Root

I like lotus root stuffed with sticky rice and served with osmanthus flower syrup.

Personally, I like a stir fry I learned from Just Hungry: with leeks, ginger, garlic, mirin, red pepper, and soy sauce. It kind of caramelizes in a hot pan.

I also like chunks of lotus (the kind that turns red when it's cooked) in cantonese-style soups.

Top 10 Improbable McDonald's Items from Around the World

In Taiwan: Spicy fried chicken (bones and all), plus faux bulgogi burger with buns made out of rice, to compete with Mos Burger. The chicken was addictive, but the burgers were a sad second to Mos.

The one Madhur Jaffrey cookbook I should own?

I did a search, but am still indecisive -- if I only have one Madhur Jaffrey cookbook, which one should it be? (I'm not a vegetarian but eat heavily plant-based, so that's not a consideration.) Which one will potentially teach me the most about basic techniques, but not be so complicated I won't attempt any of the recipes?

The top ones appear to be:
Indian cooking
An Invitation to Indian Cooking
At home with Madhur Jaffrey

Any other suggestions highly appreciated!

Yellow Vanilla Pound Cake

In her cookbook The Taste of Country Cooking, Edna Lewis says there was always pound cake on special summer occasions to eat with whatever berries and fruit were left over from canning and preserving. This cake is dense and delicious,... More

Seriously Asian: Naengmyeon, Korean Cold Noodles

Korean cold noodles, naengmyeon, are Korea's counterpart to Japanese soba. Both naengmyeon and soba can be made from buckwheat; both can be served cold in a savory broth, topped with an assorted of refreshing vegetables and fish. On a hot summer's day, naengmyeon is an ideal one-bowl dish requiring so little cooking on the stove that you'll be contentedly slurping noodles long before your kitchen's had a chance to heat up. More