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The Quick and Easy Way to Make Flavor-Packed Korean Ramen

Making real-deal ramen is a lengthy project that requires planning in advance. But there are days when you just want a delicious bowl of it, without the fuss. This easy Korean-style kimchi ramen is for those times. It's loaded with flavor, but takes less than an hour to throw together, thanks to several umami-rich ingredients and a cool baking-soda trick that turns angel-hair pasta into ramen-like noodles. More

Knife Skills: How to Prepare, Peel, and Cut Butternut Squash

A symbol of fall, butternut squash is perhaps the most common and versatile of winter squashes. Thanks to its firm flesh and very thick, tough skin, it can keep for a long time at room temperature, but that thick skin and firm flesh also makes it more challenging than most vegetables to peel and slice. Here are the tools and techniques for trimming the squash, peeling it, removing its seeds, and then cutting it into different size pieces. More

How to Cook the Perfect Roast Chicken

A symbol of comfort and perfect simplicity, roast chicken is one of the foods I crave in the colder months. This recipe from our archives is brilliant in that it uses a few key techniques to guarantee a juicier, tastier bird, without over-complicating what, at its heart, should be an easy yet satisfying dish. More

Turn Your Pasta Into Ramen With Baking Soda

Word on the street is that you can turn any noodle into a ramen noodle by boiling it in baking-soda water. We've put the claim to the test, and now have clear instructions for how to do it—and how not to do it. We'll just tell you now, when done right, this is a homemade ramen game-changer. More

These 4 Mexican Braises Will Jump-Start Your Fall

Who else craves spicy, heartily-seasoned Mexican braises in the fall, whether stuffed into tacos, crammed into burritos, strewn across your nachos, or just shoved into your face with reckless abandon? Yeah, we thought so. Here are four of our favorite slow-cooked Mexican meat dishes guaranteed to taste better than any restaurant in town. More

Doritos Migas With Pepper Jack Will Rock Your Morning, Hangover or Not

There are days when you wake up and say, I'm going to painstakingly make the best damn Tex-Mex migas I possibly can. And then there are days when you pry yourself from bed, feel your head swirl and split as you sit up, and remember those last two rounds of shots you got roped into—after you had already had what was supposed to be your last drink. On those days, you need these quick and easy Doritos migas. Actually, you might need these on all days. More

How to Make The Best Chicken Stock

White chicken stock, in which neither the chicken nor the aromatics are roasted first, may be the most versatile of all stocks, enhancing any soup, sauce, or glaze you use it in. It's also incredibly easy to make. Here, we look at some of the factors that lead to a deeply flavorful stock, while keeping the method and ingredients as easy and accessible as possible. Requiring such a minimal investment of time and effort, this stock will upgrade any dish or sauce you make compared to the store-bought variety. More

How Bad Wine Led Me to Great Shrimp Scampi

To get the most flavor in this shrimp scampi, we use vermouth instead of white wine, and a mix of fragrant herbs—parsley, tarragon, and chives—instead of just parsley. The silky butter sauce, meanwhile, is brightened with a splash of fresh lemon juice and fresh lemon zest. It's a quick, easy, one-pot Italian-American classic with just enough extra flavor and flair to make it special. More

How to Make Quick and Easy Italian-American Red Sauce That Tastes Slow-Cooked

There are times when you can stand over the stove all day, slowly cooking that red sauce down. Then there are times when you need to put dinner on the table in under an hour. For those moments when convenience trumps patience, this is the red sauce to turn to. Simmered with plenty of garlic, dried oregano, red pepper flakes, and basil, this sauce can be whipped up in no time but still has that deep, rich, long-cooked flavor. More

How to Make Korean Stir-Fried Pork With Chili Marinade and Kimchi (Jaeyook Kimchi Bokum)

There are too many great meat dishes in the Korean canon to pick a favorite, but this one of stir-fried marinated pork with kimchi is definitely in my top five. Easy to make, it features thin strips of pork shoulder in a spicy-sweet blend of Korean chili paste, garlic, ginger, soy sauce, and sesame oil—plus a bit of Asian pear for both flavor and its tenderizing effect on the meat. More

How to Make Aguachile: The Chili-Spiked Mexican Ceviche

If you love ceviche, then Mexico's aguachile is for you. Traditionally made with raw shrimp, lime juice, chilies, cucumber, and onion, it's served immediately while still totally raw, unlike most other ceviche recipes. It's worth trying the original version, but the dish is a springboard for improvisation. Try the three recipes here, starting from the classic, and then proceeding with two increasingly untraditional versions. More

How to Make The Best Chicken Stock

@ManNWT I'm not sure you did fail. Without tasting it, it's hard to know for sure, but a basic white chicken stock should have a very clean flavor. The fact that you successfully extracted the gelatin from the chicken indicates that you got plenty out of it. It's important to remember that a basic white stock isn't meant to taste or even look like a rich, golden chicken broth: It's a building block for other dishes, not ready-for-showtime as-is.

This Week at Serious Eats World Headquarters

@Rob Thanks for the extra info--so definitely a red tailed hawk then. This is definitely out of my zone of expertise so good to have people who know better than I weigh in. Sorry for getting it wrong!

This Week at Serious Eats World Headquarters

Hm, just looked at more red tail hawk photos, and I see some that have spotted, not-red tails. So okay, that probably is another red tail hawk.

This Week at Serious Eats World Headquarters

@aya and @ravenous May be right that's it's not a peregrine, but it's also not a red tail I don't think (then again, I know next to nothing about birds). The 2nd bird didn't have red tail feathers, they were dark-gray and white, and spotted. Any other ideas? I thought it was a peregrine because I had just seen an article that peregrines were in the area in the local Cape Cod paper, and I had noticed the spotting on the tail feathers of peregrines, so figured that's what this is. Or do red tail hawks sometimes have spotted, not-red tail feathers?

Use the Pressure Cooker for a Butternut Squash Risotto Packed With Layers of Flavor

@Porgy No real reason, you could do that here too, but I didn't in this case. I hadn't really thought about it much because this method was working for me so well as-is, but your question has got me thinking. In Kenji's piece on risotto, it's a very simple, classic one, wholly dependent on the starchy broth water (well, and a little cream and cheese at the end) to create the creamy sauce that the rice grains are suspended in. With this risotto here, I'm also using a squash puree, and the texture of that puree adds a lot to the saucy texture of the finished risotto. Maybe when adding purees to flavor a risotto, it isn't as necessary to take the extra steps for the absolutely perfect method Kenji described, since the puree comes in and fixes things anyway... if that makes sense. Also, now I feel compelled to point out that the risotto shown here, when initially plated, was a little more fluid, but it thickened as it cooled while we took photos, so it looks thicker than it originally was.

Quick Kimchi Ramen With Shiitake Mushrooms and Soft-Cooked Egg

@arielleeve You can make it vegetarian for sure. I might try to enhance the vegetable stock even more by simmering mushroom trimmings in it (like the shiitake stems, for instance) and then straining them out before using the broth. Also make sure to seek kimchi you buy is vegetarian--most versions are made with some kind of fish or shellfish.

Turn Your Pasta Into Ramen With Baking Soda

@ePressureCooker Yeah, I think that's right. I didn't go into detail in the article, but the progressive browning of the water is almost definitely the Mailliard reaction, presumably of the starches that have gotten into the cooking water. For some reason the taste isn't good in this instance, maybe just because of the intensity, or maybe because of the concentration of flavors...or maybe something else?

Perfect Quick-and-Easy French Toast

@Erin The main reason I call for unsalted butter in most recipes, including this one, is it allows me more control over how much salt to add to the dish without having to contend with individual ingredients that are already salty on their own. That said, I can't imagine salted butter would ruin this unless you or any of your fellow diners were very sensitive to salt.

How to Make Aguachile: The Chili-Spiked Mexican Ceviche

@Ivelisse The stamp of approval from a reader from Sinaloa is about the highest praise this can get, so thank you! And thank you also for the additional info about the chiltepin chiles. I'll have to try it with those!

The Best Fresh Tomato Sauce

@RoseK As @Bigbananafeet said, freezing is definitely a good way to store this. I don't generally like to recommend canning tomato sauces that haven't been developed with canning in mind, since that can get into some food-safety danger territory. If you're a pro with tomato-sauce canning and know how to control the pH properly so that it is safe, then yes, you should be able to can this sauce, though you may lose some of the fresh tomato flavors with the intense heat of the canning process. In that regard, freezing may be preferable.

How to Cook the Perfect Roast Chicken

@pete I understand that and agree that it isn't ideal but right now, with the blog format of the site, there's no other way to resurface good old content without literally republishing the original article with a new date on it, which would be even more misleading. For now, we try to make it clear in the new article that is about an earlier one, with links and credit clearly stated. In the future, we're working on a site design that will solve all of this much more elegantly.

Turn Your Pasta Into Ramen With Baking Soda

@kiefster There are some areas that would be interesting to explore further here, but I caution getting too caught up in the details and losing sight of the big picture. In this case, this is a simple hack that's great because of its simplicity, not in spite of it. This does not make objectively excellent ramen noodles, it makes noodles that are close enough to ramen noodles that they can pass when you're in a jam. Going down the rabbit hole with things like baked baking soda, lye, pre-soaks-- they're all interesting and I'd be curious to see the results, but at the end of the day I don't think this trick is capable of a wholesale transformation of the regular pasta noodles into something they're not, and any kind of big investment of time is almost guaranteed to bring improvements that are increasingly subtle to the point of not really being worth it. Let's take the rinse as an example. On the one hand it's a good idea, and I don't really see any harm in it, except that it's more work: you have to heat yet more water and have it ready to pour over the noodles you've just cooked in the baking soda water. Not a terrible pain in the butt, but still, it's one more thing to do, and let's face it: ramen has enough components to worry about as it is. From my own tasting, I'm fairly positive that the bulk of the baking soda flavor is in the noodles, not on them, so a rinse may help a little, but it's not going to fully get rid of it. Meanwhile, we're talking about ramen here, with is served in lots of broth—when we pour the broth over the cooked noodles, the noodles basically do get rinsed: in the broth. The trace amounts of cooking water clinging to the noodles will wash off into the broth, where they will be diluted to the point of their extra flavor being totally negligible. Combine that with the concentrated flavor of the broth, and it becomes a non-issue, which is why my tests showed that once the noodles are added to a flavorful broth, the unpleasant baking soda flavor is more or less tamed anyway. I only added the bit about delicate broths as a caveat, just in case someone was making a ramen where they might be concerned the baking soda flavor would show through. I also did test higher concentrations of baking soda in the water, and the noodles were absolutely inedible, a rinse would not have fixed it.

I'm not saying what I've written is the last word on this, or that there's nothing left to explore here, but I think we need to also remember what this is: a trick that is only as cool as it is easy, and one that really is best when you don't have a better option available to you. Beyond that, we're getting into gilded lily territory, at least as far as I can see it.

@lemonfair Cool idea, a compilation of baking soda tricks would be great!

How to Make The Best Chicken Stock

@jimmyjo They don't call me Superlative Man for nothin'! Seriously though, we spend a lot of time doing the legwork here at SE, testing and re-testing and going quite a bit deeper and further than most of our competitors. This is a topic that a lot of writers would have dialed in: They would have just repeated the same old mantra (e.g., "don't skim") and hit "Publish". So yeah, we make bold claims in our headlines pretty frequently (and not just me).

Turn Your Pasta Into Ramen With Baking Soda

@Anononnie Of course it depends on the concentration, but lye is very alkaline. My guess is, if anything, it would only intensify those off flavors, but I don't know for sure. Of course, it goes without saying that you should be very careful when cooking with lye as it can cause some pretty nasty burns. Pretzels are baked after their lye bath, which neutralizes the effect, but if you got that pretzel-bath water on you I think it would do some damage (so lye pasta water may well present the same risk...).

@mushroom I didn't bake the baking soda in this case. To me the beauty of this is the shortcut it offers, and adding a baking step, or any other lengthier process kind of undoes the advantage it's offering... at that point I'd sooner just jump on the subway and go buy some better noodles. But that doesn't mean it isn't worth trying, along with some of the other clever ideas above! (Especially if you have absolutely no access to other options.)

Turn Your Pasta Into Ramen With Baking Soda

@Sam I'm so habituated to not rinsing my noodles that I didn't think to try it. You may well be right, maybe rinsing would help...

The Best Things I Ate in Mexico City and Puebla

@PommeDG Right, really the distinction I'm trying to make is between freshly made from-scratch masa, and masa made from masa harina, which, yes, is nixtamalized masa, but it's then dehydrated into a flour (I don't know the exact process), and then reconstituted with water later. I'll review my text and try to clarify above. Honestly, my issue isn't even with masa harina, which is a perfectly respectable product that delivers a lot of convenience and pretty darn good results (though the fresh stuff is still better), but with pre-made tortillas that sit on supermarket shelves in plastic bags--far too many NYC Mexican restaurants use that. Even if they switched to masa harina, it'd be a big upgrade.

@veremex I did not know that! Now I'm going to hunt down the original track. Thanks for letting me know!

The Best Things I Ate in Mexico City and Puebla

Yes you guys are right, it's escamoles, not esquites. I've been swapping those words in my head for weeks and have mostly caught myself, but obviously didn't this time. I've fixed it in the text.

The Best Things I Ate in Mexico City and Puebla

@notmyrealname You mean the tuna one from Contramar? It's a tostada, so basically a tortilla that's been deep fried until crispy.

The Best Things I Ate in Mexico City and Puebla

@Burger365 Yes! It came with a broth on the side that we ate as soup.

How to Make The Best Chicken Stock

@petitegourmande I guess it depends on how clear you want it. Consomme clear? It may not work for that level of clarity. But as long as you keep the pressure cooker from venting and boiling, it shouldn't be terribly cloudy either.

How to Make The Best Chicken Stock

@AnthonyC The solids to liquid ratio thing is tricky, since any change in pot dimensions can have an effect on whether or not the liquid covers. You can try to break the chicken down more, or just add enough water to cover the chicken. It shouldn't harm the stock too much either way--the important thing is that the chicken is submerged.

Doritos Migas With Pepper Jack Will Rock Your Morning, Hangover or Not

@kale Yeah, you're probably right.

How to Make The Best Chicken Stock

@Broacher You are the best kind of freak, my friend. Trust me, I'm just like you so I know.

How to Make the Best Tomato Sauce From Fresh Tomatoes

@brodieb666 The low-temp oven portion of the recipe is to slowly concentrate and caramelize the tomato flavor for lots of deep, sweet, long-cooked flavor, but then that is offset by mixing it and briefly cooking it with the other portions of the sauce. (Or am I misunderstanding the question?)

Basic Chicken Stock

@S.PRince You're right--I didn't double the carrots and celery when writing the final recipe. Thanks for catching that, I've updated the quantities above.

The Ultimate Fully Loaded Nachos

What does it take to make an incredible plate of bar-style, fully loaded nachos? For starters, at least three kinds of cheese, two kinds of beans, and two different applications of creamy, tangy dairy. It may sound like overkill, but there's a method to this madness. More