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Stephanie Pierson

Stephanie Pierson

If Stephanie Pierson smells like brisket it is because she spent two years writing the definitive ode to brisket: The Brisket Book. A Love Story With Recipes. (published by Andrews McMeel.) When she wasn’t sweating over a hot MacBook, she was sweating over a hot stove, testing Aquavit briskets, Anita Lo’s Brisket Noodle Soup, Aunt Glady’s Brisket, and many others. A regular contributor to the food coverage at TheAtlantic.com, her work has been published in the Huffington Post, the New York Times, Saveur, Metropolitan Home, Eating Well, epicurious, and edible Berkshires. She is the author of a dozen books including Vegetables Rock! and has ghost-written five cookbooks.

We Chat With: Julia Moskin and Kim Severson About Their New Cookbook, 'CookFight'

Round one of CookFight, the new cookbook from Julia Moskin and Kim Severson that comes out today, took place in 2009 when then New York Times restaurant critic Frank Bruni gave the two writers, and best friends, a challenge: make a dinner for six people for under $50. Round two was cooking a Thanksgiving dinner. And thus began the conceit for CookFight, a book of kitchen battles. The perfect picnic; the best comfort food; a fantastic children's party. More

The Complete Serious Eats Barbecue & Sauce Style Guide

And for New York, what about BrisketTown in Brooklyn? What about Jack Black's in KC?

Aaron Franklin Drops a Brisket Bomb at Hill Country's 'Pop-Up Joint'

I would like to know if he is using Hill Country's meat, what makes it different. I'd also like to know what Hugh Mangum and Dan Delaney thought of it. It's a small - and mostly collegial - brisket world.

Where to Eat with Vegetarians and Meat Lovers in NYC: An Omnivorous Guide to 60 Restaurants

For the veggie burger alone, Westville. And there are 3 of them! Also, Maury Rubin's pint-sized pop-up at Books of Wonder. At that one, you might want to bring your 4-year-old for a delicious vegetarian selection.

Where to get a nice brisket?

Hi - I am the author of The Brisket Book: A Love Story With Recipes. And good question: you can get brisket anywhere (in New York City) from Costco to Citarella. Yours sounds great and I am a grass-fed fan - for best practices and for taste. One of the places I go for great brisket (from Kansas City) is Eataly. Their meat is fantastic. (Not cheap!) Also, Marlow & Daughters in Brooklyn. And Meat Hook. Schatzie's on the Upper West Side is great and a real family butcher. So is Holland Court on Lex in the 90s. Hope it is delicious!

You Asked The Food Lab 164 Questions. Here Are 164 Answers

Kenji - you are so amazing - I am working on a book project right now and this was the best, most worthy and fascinating diversion ever! Thanks for being so smart and coming across so down-to-earth and mostly for being so extremely generous.

what shouldn't go into a brisket?

thanks - that sounds so so good!

Brisket for your Valentine? Sexy?

From the poster. The recipe for Glazed Braised Brisket, with Valentine Cranberry Slices. I thought I had posted this yesterday, but don't see it. So here it is again. Get a brisket that has about 1/4" fat on it. Enjoy!

Cranberry Braised Glazed Brisket

--Note: If you prefer a thicker sauce, you can reduce it on the stove further after reheating

One 4- to 5-pound beef brisket
2 teaspoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon paprika
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 large onions, peeled and cut into eighths Two 14-ounce cans jellied cranberry sauce, sliced Sprinkle both sides of the brisket with the garlic powder, paprika, and salt and pepper taste. Tightly cover the brisket with plastic wrap and refrigerate for two days.

When you’re ready to finish the dish, preheat the oven to 500°F.

Unwrap the brisket, place it in a roasting pan, and roast for 20 minutes on each side. Remove the pan from the oven and decrease the temperature to 350°F. Place the onions under and around the brisket, then cover the top of the meat with the cranberry sauce slices. Tightly cover the pan with heavy-duty aluminum foil and cook until fork tender, about three hours.

Remove the pan from the oven and allow the brisket to cool. Transfer the brisket to a cutting board, trim the fat, then slice the meat against the grain to the desired thickness. Return the slices to the pot, overlapping them at an angle so that you can see a bit of the top edge of each slice, cover the pan with foil, and refrigerate overnight.

The next day, remove any congealed fat from the top of the sauce. Heat the brisket, covered, at 350°F for 20 minutes, then uncovered for another 20 to 30 minutes until hot and the sauce has reduced a bit. Serve with the sauce.

Brisket for your Valentine? Sexy?

Here's a recipe for :

Glazed Braised Cranberry Brisket
Serves 8 to 10

Head Notes: If you prefer a thicker sauce, you can reduce it on the stove further after reheating. Make sure your brisket has about 1/4 inch of fat on the top - you don't want it too lean.


One 4- to 5-pound beef brisket
2 teaspoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon paprika
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 large onions, peeled and cut into eighths
Two 14-ounce cans jellied cranberry sauce, sliced

Sprinkle both sides of the brisket with the garlic powder, paprika, and salt and pepper taste. Tightly cover the brisket with plastic wrap and refrigerate for two days.

When you’re ready to finish the dish, preheat the oven to 500°F.

Unwrap the brisket, place it in a roasting pan, and roast for 20 minutes on each side. Remove the pan from the oven and decrease the temperature to 350°F. Place the onions under and around the brisket, then cover the top of the meat with the cranberry sauce slices. Tightly cover the pan with heavy-duty aluminum foil and cook until fork tender, about three hours.

Remove the pan from the oven and allow the brisket to cool. Transfer the brisket to a cutting board, trim the fat, then slice the meat against the grain to the desired thickness. Return the slices to the pot, overlapping them at an angle so that you can see a bit of the top edge of each slice, cover the pan with foil, and refrigerate overnight.

The next day, remove any congealed fat from the top of the sauce. Heat the brisket, covered, at 350°F for 20 minutes, then uncovered for another 20 to 30 minutes until hot and the sauce has reduced a bit. Serve with the sauce.

Brisket for your Valentine? Sexy?

From the poster: thanks for excellent opinions and good wishes with the book. I will - in a little bit - post a recipe. Maybe two of them. One is a sweet and very simple one made with cranberry slices. And I'll give you mine, which is terrific and also so easy - but does used the dreaded Lipton Onion Soup mix, so it is less than pure. But then, sexy isn't also pure.

what shouldn't go into a brisket?

Hi Celery: Just saw your post. Funny, hardly anyone does put celery into a braised brisket. Kenji would probably have some supersmart chemical/taste reason why it isn't a great ingredient. So thanks to everyone! So helpful. And the book is The Brisket Book (hmm...how do I think of that?!) and it will be out next November. AndrewsMcMeel is the publisher. By the way, if anyone is still reading all this and can bear it, I am writing a chapter on how romantic it can be to serve someone a brisket - briskets being made with love. And just the aroma says WOW! Does anyone have a story about romance and brisket? JDate has a short piece on how to woo with brisket. Thanks! Semper Brisket.

what shouldn't go into a brisket?

Again, this is from the poster of the original question. LOVE the answers: Strawberry Quik! Love even the idea of a "food"/"drink" that is chemical and misspelled! The baking soda story is hilarious. The idea of a foamy brisket just says...there's trouble ahead! By the way, to whoever talked about adding potatoes - I think adding them too early is a problem and they will be mushy. Thanks for saying the grass-fed brisket was so good. The grass-fed/grass-fed, grain-finished dialogue goes on. A lot of the good and caring restaurant owners in my book say that they serve grass-fed, grain-finished because the taste is more consistent, the meat is properly marbled, and these animals can be humanely raised. Read Bernadette Hahn Niman on the subject if you want to learn more.

what shouldn't go into a brisket?

Hi - As the poster of the question, thanks for such smart and helpful responses. I am also a huge fan of Ruth Reich's brisket recipe - it is terrific. And am very grateful for what shouldn't go into a brisket - love that chicken shouldn't go in! Does anyone put it in? And the discussion on what to call a brisket in Canada has been on Chowhound boards - just google it. The answer seems to be that it is just called brisket - I don't understand why it seems so mysterious there, but you are not the first one to ask the question! Also, could I ask if anyone has braised a grass-fed brisket? I am about to do so. Wish me luck!

We Chat With: Julia Moskin and Kim Severson About Their New Cookbook, 'CookFight'

Round one of CookFight, the new cookbook from Julia Moskin and Kim Severson that comes out today, took place in 2009 when then New York Times restaurant critic Frank Bruni gave the two writers, and best friends, a challenge: make a dinner for six people for under $50. Round two was cooking a Thanksgiving dinner. And thus began the conceit for CookFight, a book of kitchen battles. The perfect picnic; the best comfort food; a fantastic children's party. More