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The True Adonis

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Food Lab cookbook is going to be epic!


On a side note....You guys forgot that Friday, January 23 is National Pie Day!

The Best Egg Salad

Made the recipe as it was written 3 times last week. The technique of using your hands really gets the right texture. I can have the entire thing done well before the eggs finish boiling (also using Kenji`s method in the steamer basket).

Easiest and best egg salad I have made and I have made a ton of different recipes including my own. Kenji really hits the ratio of Mayo to egg perfectly.

The Food Lab: Introducing Lasagna Napoletana, the Meatball and Cheese-Packed Lasagna of Your Dreams

I think you gave me the wrong link for the fresh pasta on accident.
Is this the one by Nikki?

http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/01/best-easy-all-purpose-fresh-pasta-dough-recipe-instructions.html

The Food Lab: Introducing Lasagna Napoletana, the Meatball and Cheese-Packed Lasagna of Your Dreams

Kenji, what brand and type of Lasagna noodles would you recommend? Are the no boil options any worse or better than the other options?

How to Make Maryland Fried Chicken With White Gravy

I`d say you nailed it Daniel. Hit all the points and this is truly an authentic version, especially with the addition of butter in the gravy. Other recipes seem to miss this for some reason, and some add chicken broth even. Your version would be right at home with the original. Any other fried chicken recipes in the works? You can never have too many of those.

How to Make Maryland Fried Chicken With White Gravy

How to Make Meatball Pizza

This is like one of the best week`s ever on Serious Eats. The Maryland Fried Chicken, This Meatball Pizza and the Meatballs themselves!

The Secrets of the Juiciest, Most Tender and Flavorful Italian-American Meatballs

The "twee-est" meatball I think comes in one of those little packages called Michelina's (there appears to be what looks like a genuine "Italian-Grandmother" on the front of the box). Here is the recipe if you are looking for a real "Twee" meatball.

1. Acquire box.
2. Put in Microwave.
3. Enjoy your Twee-Balls

I`ll just make Daniel's recipe instead. :)

The Secrets of the Juiciest, Most Tender and Flavorful Italian-American Meatballs

I don`t know about anyone else here, but I hate that word "twee". I have been in a few neighborhoods that might get you beat up if you called their food twee.

The Secrets of the Juiciest, Most Tender and Flavorful Italian-American Meatballs

@Jnjn2

Actually, the first mention of "Italian-American" Spaghetti and Meatballs in food history/literature contains eggs and a liquid-water or milk to semi spoiled milk/buttermilk.

[1922]
"Meat balls and spaghetti
A meal that will 'hit the spot' on a cool fall or winter day. Boil 1 package American Beauty Spaghetti until tender (almost 15 minutes). Break 3/8 pound of dry bread into small pieces and put into 3/4 cup hot water, allow bread to soften, then squeeze out water. Put 1/2 pound chuck beef, 1/4 pound shoulder pork and 2 slices onion thru a meat chopper. Mix with bread, 1 beaten egg, 2 tablespoons chopped parsley, 1 1/2 teaspoons salt, 1/8 teaspoon pepper, and 1/4 pound grated cheese. Form into balls. Fry balls in olive oil. Serve with spaghetti and tomato sauce."
---display ad, Amerian Beauty Macaroni Products, The Hutchinson News [Kansas], Ocboter 27, 1922 (p. 10)

The Secrets of the Juiciest, Most Tender and Flavorful Italian-American Meatballs

@Jnjn2

Actually, the first mention of "Italian-American" Spaghetti and Meatballs in food history/literature contains eggs and a liquid-water or milk to semi spoiled milk/buttermilk.

[1922]
"Meat balls and spaghetti
A meal that will 'hit the spot' on a cool fall or winter day. Boil 1 package American Beauty Spaghetti until tender (almost 15 minutes). Break 3/8 pound of dry bread into small pieces and put into 3/4 cup hot water, allow bread to soften, then squeeze out water. Put 1/2 pound chuck beef, 1/4 pound shoulder pork and 2 slices onion thru a meat chopper. Mix with bread, 1 beaten egg, 2 tablespoons chopped parsley, 1 1/2 teaspoons salt, 1/8 teaspoon pepper, and 1/4 pound grated cheese. Form into balls. Fry balls in olive oil. Serve with spaghetti and tomato sauce."
---display ad, Amerian Beauty Macaroni Products, The Hutchinson News [Kansas], Ocboter 27, 1922 (p. 10)

The Secrets of the Juiciest, Most Tender and Flavorful Italian-American Meatballs

@ Joy See,

I guarantee you can eat these meatballs weekly if you wanted to for 30 years and be in perfect health.

I will definitely be making this. Daniel, do you guys get the Whole Fat Buttermilk or are you stuck with the usual lowfat. I find it does make a pretty big difference in some applications and in others, not so much.

The Ethics of Foie Gras: New Fire for an Old Debate

http://www.oddee.com/item_98725.aspx

7 Cases of Animals that Committed Suicide
9/27/2013
by Admin
Weird Science

The Ethics of Foie Gras: New Fire for an Old Debate

http://www.bio.uaic.ro/publicatii/anale_zoologie/issue/2004/42-2004.pdf

Captive Dolphins commit suicide!

One of the major causes of death among captive dolphins is suicide. They kill themselves in many different ways from just refusing to eat all the way to the extreme of smashing their heads against walls!

Dolphins sometime have trouble adapting to new ways of life. For instance, dolphins mainly rely on raw fish diets that they hunt for themselves. When in captivity, they are fed pieces of fish from humans, which can shock the dolphins and send them spiraling into suicide.

Dolphins die from smashing their heads on the walls, but it is not always intentional! Many times, the dolphins will get excited and not understand the boundaries of the tanks they are in, so much so that they accidentally continually crash into them! Read more about this phenomenon by clicking the source!

The Ethics of Foie Gras: New Fire for an Old Debate

Arlius,

You are wrong as usual.

Hope this helps. (doubt that it will)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animal_suicide

The Ethics of Foie Gras: New Fire for an Old Debate

Humans ARE animals genius. The fifth ape.

Furthermore, I have stuck to my guns the whole way through and points 1-4 have been my contention the entire time.

Please show me any deviation. You won`t find it, because I did not.

Again, you seem to think humans are not animals. Let me quote you directly: "Humans are not the same as animals."

Sorry, but there is no other interpretation to be made here. You think humans are separate from animals and are not animals, thus implying inferiority. Your other posts also denote as much. Scroll back and reread what you wrote.

I think you don`t even realize what you write from post to post. This whole thread is about ethics and all of my comments are indeed relevant.

I will post this point again then: My point about suicide bombers and humans is that the majority of humans do not even comprehend death accurately. The overwhelming majority are religious and believe they will continue living after they die and that they will either join their magical sky daddy or they will be rewarded with 72 virgins or some other nonsense.

That is not rational or fact based, but that is what the majority of humans currently believe. So its safe to say, as an aggregate, most humans do not comprehend death accurately.

You also claimed that livestock are not sentient. You wrote: "They are not sentient".

I get it, you are a dominionist. You think humans are not animals, and that animals are not sentient, both things you have stated.

You also fail to realize that humans, as a majority, have a strange concept of death as I noted above. Keep in mind you brought the whole death element in all of it, not I. Go ahead and take the easy way out though, and blame me. I get it, its easier for you that way then to defend your very own words and "ideas" that you introduced first to the conversation.

All I did was merely expose your ridiculous "argument" for what it was- ridiculous and nonsensical- yet you continue.

I see no reason for Kenji to lock anything. We were having a debate and when it does not go your way, you pitch a fit and float the notion that Kenji will lock the thread and then proceed to blame me again for your inadequate rebuttal. Everything I linked has something to do with the topic at hand. I am truly sorry you fail at following along. Don`t introduce your ridiculous "arguments" and expect me not to address them and then claim I am responsible for introducing the notion of being aware or unaware or having a valid conception about death- that was all you buddy.

If you can`t take the heat, get out of the kitchen.

The Ethics of Foie Gras: New Fire for an Old Debate

Marcolo,

How did I destroy anything? This is the comment section and the title and point of the thread was meant to invoke a debate. Everything remains intact. What did I specifically destroy? I wish there were more opportunities for discussion such as this on this site. I admit I am an expert Provocateur, but that shouldn`t be a surprise nor should it really be unwelcome. I probably used the "M" word a little more than I should have and if I offended anyone, I am not really sorry, but I will pretend to be.

Anyways, I don`t see my position on this Foie Gras matter that outlandish or insensible.

1. I do not want to ban it and never have said I wanted to as evidence suggests it can be carried out humanely if certain measures and actions are taken by those who produce Foie Gras.

2. To make sure this process is carried out humanely, I would like to see strict regulations in place based off all the available Evidence and Data/Science to where the process can take place without any harm or suffering to the animal.

3. I want to minimize or totally eliminate any suffering of the animal. I believe it is our moral duty to do so since we are responsible for the birth of the animal that is to be consumed in the first place. All the more reason to treat the animal with respect.

4. Animals think, reason, feel and have emotions etc... No idea why anyone wants minimize this and rank them as somehow inferior to humans as if that is the pinnacle of being.

So tell me where I am wrong? I honestly don`t see any difference between my view and Kenji`s view on Foie Gras.

Perhaps many are up in arms because I countered their "logic" by turning it on its head and using their own juvenile suppositions against them. No idea.

The Ethics of Foie Gras: New Fire for an Old Debate

Moron Arlius,

The facts are in my favor. My point about suicide bombers and humans is that the majority do not even comprehend death accurately. The overwhelming majority are religious and believe they will continue living after they die and that they will either join their magical sky daddy or they will be rewarded with 72 virgins or some other nonsense.

That is not rational or fact based, but that is what the majority of humans currently believe. So its safe to say, as an aggregate, most humans do not comprehend death accurately. Don't even get me started on how many different African tribes interpret death...

I am glad that elephants and other animals don't interpret death the way the majority of humans on this planet do. We have enough death and destruction and pointless misery because of human inability to come to terms with or interpret death correctly. Thank god for the animals!

There is no fundamental difference between man and the higher mammals in their mental faculties… The difference in mind between man and the higher animals, great as it is, certainly is one of degree and not of kind. We have seen that the senses and intuitions, the various emotions and faculties, such as love, memory, attention and curiosity, imitation, reason, etc., of which man boasts, may be found in an incipient, or even sometimes a well-developed condition, in the lower animals.
~ Charles Darwin

The Ethics of Foie Gras: New Fire for an Old Debate

@Arlius

Calm down Gloria. Ever heard of George Carlin?

George Carlin - "Chickens Are Decent People"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ze_dBldmBDw

The Ethics of Foie Gras: New Fire for an Old Debate

“Why should I fear death?
If I am, then death is not.
If Death is, then I am not.
Why should I fear that which can only exist when I do not?"- Epicurus

The Ethics of Foie Gras: New Fire for an Old Debate

There are millions/billions of religious humans (and non-religious for that matter) that are not apprehensive of their future death or don`t worry about it.

So what? Some wear bombs strapped to their chest even. Others like to attack police officers with no forethought of their impending and justified death. Billions think they will live on after death and are not worried about the here and now.

Its clear that humans are capable of not being apprehensive at all regarding a future death.

I wish more were, because it certainly would be a better world if they were more aware.

The Ethics of Foie Gras: New Fire for an Old Debate

Pigster,

Hope this helps:
The Bischof-Köhler hypothesis may not be correct as some animals behave in a manner than appears to anticipate the future, and is inconsistent with behavioral or instinctive predispositions:

Food caching scrub jays

A species of corvid, the scrub jay, has been discovered to store certain food types from hours to a day in advanced of having an appetite for that food type. Researchers would randomly give scrub jays a breakfast with or without pine seeds over a period of days. The birds that had learned this pattern were more likely to store pine seeds with the anticipation that there may be breakfasts without them in the future.[14] Their actions depend on when and where they stored what (food type), expecting certain things to happen in the future.[15] This is not a behavioral predisposition because after researchers destroyed or stole the food items that were hidden, the scrub jays learned not to store their food. It was also discovered that they would re-hide any food items that other scrub jays had witnessed, if they themselves had previously stolen food items from another bird. This shows that they can imagine the future possibility of food theft from their own past experiences.[14]

Bonobos and orangutans

The Bonobo and Orangutan are close evolutionary relatives of human beings. Researchers gave apes from these species a chance to experience and learn how to use a tool to obtain a reward from an obstacle. They were later allowed to select a suitable tool from the test room when the obstacle was in view, but not accessible. Each ape was then led to a waiting room. The apes brought the tool into the waiting room and were left there for different time periods. Next they were again brought to the test room and were required to voluntarily bring the tool back into the test room upon their return. Seventy percent chose the right tool and brought it with them to the waiting room and back into the test room, with the anticipation that they would need it in future use. The apes were able to do this task with up to a fourteen hour delay. Therefore, they chose appropriate tools, saved them, and carried them around with the anticipation that they would need them in the future.[13]

Squirrel monkeys

Experimenters have also found results of memory for the future in the squirrel monkey. In the first experiment, researchers gave squirrel monkeys the choice of four peanuts or two peanuts. Next, they were given the choice of only two peanuts and the researcher would come back with a larger reward of ten peanuts fifteen minutes later. After this experience, when given the choice of four peanuts at the present moment or two peanuts with the anticipation of ten more peanuts on the way, more of the monkeys chose two peanuts.

Another experiment gave the monkeys a choice of one or four dates, which made the squirrel monkeys thirsty. When they made the choice of four dates they had a three hour period without water. A choice of one date gave them water half an hour later, relieving the monkey's thirst much faster. Most monkeys learned from this experience, and using the memory from their past, planned for the future experience of being thirsty and chose only one date in later trials.[14]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_for_the_future

In Defense of St. Louis-Style Pizza

I`m still waiting on Kenji's Pizza Lab on Chicago Deep Dish as well. I haven`t forgotten about that and check the site everyday in hopes of it popping up. I hope its coming still!

In Defense of St. Louis-Style Pizza

Kenji, you forgot to add your recipe!

Seriously, please make this! I did make Cook's Illustrated version and liked it, but I think you can easily do better. I do have one recipe for it in one of my books, The Pizza Bible. I wonder how close this is to what you had:

ST. LOUIS
MAKES ONE 14-INCH PIZZA; 16 SMALL SQUARES
In the late 1990s I went to St. Louis for the first time in my life to perform at Camp Quality, a camp for kids with cancer. The kids spend a week having all kinds of fun experiences, including pizza throwing, cooking, eating, and generally clowning around. There were two things I knew I needed to taste while I was there: a Budweiser and a St. Louis pizza. That’s how I discovered Imo’s, the place that makes the definitive St. Louis–style pie. It’s cracker-thin and cut into squares because it’s so thin that triangular slices would collapse under the weight of the toppings (or, according to Imo family legend, because founder Ed Imo was a linoleum tile cutter and squares were what he knew). To make the crust extra thin, I start with a smaller dough ball than usual, roll it very thin and larger than the usual 13 inches diameter, dock it, and then trim it down to 13 inches and flatten the edges.
A true St. Louis pizza is made with a decidedly sweet, oregano tomato sauce and a special cheese called Provel. A creamy white blend of provolone, Swiss, and Cheddar that’s virtually unknown outside St. Louis, Provel is a processed cheese that melts in that same gooey, guilty-pleasure way that Velveeta does. No wonder our kitchen staff is addicted to grilled cheese sandwiches made with it.
 

1 (8-ounce/225-gram) ball Master Dough Without Starter
9 parts flour mixed with 1 part semolina, for dusting
ST. LOUIS TOMATO SAUCE
4.2 ounces (120 grams/½ cup) ground tomatoes, preferably Tomato Magic or DiNapoli
4.5 ounces (125 grams/½ cup) tomato paste, preferably SuperDolce
3 tablespoons (55 grams) Simple Syrup (below)
Pinch of dried oregano
Pinch of fine sea salt
4 ounces (115 grams) Sweet Fennel Sausage, or 1 ounce (30 grams) sliced pepperoni, preferably in natural casing (optional)
7 ounces (200 grams) Provel cheese, shredded (2 cups)
Grated Parmesan cheese, for dusting
Dried oregano, for dusting
Garlic Oil, for drizzling

Remove the dough ball from the refrigerator and leave wrapped at room temperature until the dough warms to 60°F to 65°F. Meanwhile, set up the oven with two pizza stones or baking steels and preheat to 500°F for 1 hour (see Getting Started).
To make the sauce, combine all of the ingredients in a deep bowl or other deep container and puree with an immersion blender.
Dust the work surface with the dusting mixture, then move the dough to the surface and dust the top (see Transferring the Dough to the Work Surface).
Sprinkle a wooden peel with the dusting mixture.

Roll out the dough into a 14-inch round, press the edges gently to flatten them, and then dock the surface of the dough (see Rolling Pizza Dough).
Move the dough to the peel. As you work, shake the peel forward and backward to ensure the dough isn’t sticking.
Spoon the tomato sauce onto the center of the dough. Then, using the back of the spoon in a circular motion and working outward from the center, spread the sauce evenly over the surface, leaving a ¾-inch border. The sauce will weigh down the dough, keeping it flat as it bakes. The dough may have contracted as it was moved, so pull the edges as necessary to restretch it into a 14-inch round. Baking the crust without the cheese will make for a crispier crust.
Slide the pizza onto the top stone (see Moving the Dough to the Oven). Bake for 4 minutes. Remove the pizza from the oven and place it on a cutting board (or work directly on the peel if there is room to set it on the work surface). If you are using sausage, pinch nickel-size pieces and scatter them evenly over the top; if you are using pepperoni, arrange the slices evenly over the sauce. Sprinkle the Provel evenly over the pizza.
Return the pizza to the top stone and bake for 3 minutes. Lift the pizza onto the peel, rotate it 180 degrees, and then transfer it to the bottom stone. Bake for another 3 to 4 minutes, until the bottom is browned and crisp and the top is golden brown.
Transfer the pizza to the cutting board. Make 3 evenly spaced cuts through the pizza in one direction (to make 4 strips of equal width), turn the pizza 90 degrees, and repeat in the other direction, to make 16 squares. Finish with a dusting of Parmesan and oregano and a drizzle of garlic oil.
SIMPLE SYRUP
MAKES ⅓ CUP (95 GRAMS)
 

¼ cup (50 grams) sugar
¼ cup (58 grams) water

Combine the sugar and water in a small saucepan and stir to mix. Place over medium-high heat and bring to a simmer, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Remove from the heat and let cool to room temperature.
Use immediately, or transfer to a covered container and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks.

The Ethics of Foie Gras: New Fire for an Old Debate

Whats the best way to cook an abortion? Too far? :)

James Villas-Glory of Southern Cooking-Key Lime Recipe is a Fail

So, I figured I`d make a Key Lime Pie using The Key Lime Pie recipe from The Glory of Southern Cooking by James Villas. I read through it and thought it sounded kind of strange as if it wouldn`t work, but I figured I may as well follow the recipe as it was written. Absolutely horrible.

1. Graham Cracker Crust was a joke-Never was cohesive, WAY too many Graham Crackers and had a WHOLE CUP of sugar whereas most had 2-3 tablespoons at most. It was an overflowing non-cohesive powdery mess.
2. The filling had one cup of Lime Juice, most have 1/2 cup to 3/4 cup.
3. There was a tablespoon of lime zest, whereas most had one teaspoon or 1 and a half teaspoons at most.
4. The cooking time of 10 minutes is a joke. Nothing happens in that time frame.

This was absolutely horrible. Here is a direct link to the recipe so you can see what I am talking about. I want to write him and tell him how horrible his recipe is and that it could NEVER work. To think he is a James Beard award winner. What a joke. Anyone have any similar stories?

http://books.google.com/books?id=V4CJfHqT6ssC&pg=PT372&lpg=PT372&dq=glory+of+southern+cooking+key+lime+pie&source=bl&ots=52eKKhWAzT&sig=T-xC_Y0ZdTPW7VCn_LDgOibli-4&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ph1bT92FN4KutweMzsiGDA&ved=0CCwQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

What's the Best Way to Brew Iced Coffee?

When it comes to opinions on iced-coffee brewing methods, passions can run high. A panel of Serious Eats tasters heads to Counter Culture Coffee for a blind tasting, putting the most popular method to the test. Based on our experience, the answer is clear. More

Ask The Food Lab: Can I Stir-Fry On An Electric Cooktop?

"I am an avid teen food who adores her asian dishes, especially the creativity of stir fry. Now, I make it all the time but know that my end result could be exceptionally better. You had on the blog about doing the perfect stir fry on the grill but unfortunately I am in a college dorm and only have access to an electric stove. My question is: how does one not steam their vegetables while at the same time not use too much oil AND how do you not burn your corn starch sauce to the pan?" More

The Pizza Lab: Three Doughs to Know

We've gone through a lot of pizza styles and recipes here at The Pizza Lab, but I still often get asked "what's the best pizza crust recipe you know?" When I'm in the mood to fire up the grill or heat up the broiler, I might take my time and make a Neapolitan-style lean dough. If I want to relive my childhood without stepping out my apartment door, it's a New York-style. Company coming over and I want to feed a crowd without messing up the kitchen? It's Sicilian-style square pie all the way. Here's a brief run-down on the three recipes that every home pie-maker should have in their arsenal to tackle all manner of pizza-centric circumstances. More

The Food Lab: How to Roast Fall and Winter Vegetables

You can roast vegetables the easy way: just toss everything with oil, throw them on a rimmed baking sheet, and roast in a hot oven until tender. I do that often when I'm not feeling up to specialized treatment. But to get the most out of your roasted vegetables, it helps to understand each one's special characteristics. What they are, where you want them to go, and how to take them there. More

Video: How To Make Pillsbury Banana Cream Crescent Donuts At Home

Inspired by the Cronut craze, but don't want to wait for hours to sample the pastry? You don't have to: thanks to Pillsbury, you can make your own Crescent Donuts at home, and it couldn't be simpler. More

33 Hamburger Recipes For Memorial Day

I don't know who it is that designated May as National Burger Month, but I'd like to give them a big, sloppy, greasy, onion-scented, cheese-covered kiss on the mouth. What better excuse to celebrate our national sandwich (national food?) and look back at the dozens of well-tested burger recipes we have in our archives? Here are 33 recipes that run the gamut from simple to complex, with representation from around the country, breaking regional borders, and indeed inter-species relations. More