Profile

OBoud

Ask The Food Lab: Can I Make Stock in a Pressure Cooker or Slow Cooker?

I've been cooking all my stock in a pressure cooker for a couple of years now.

I wonder how the flavors compared before reduction. All those aromatics you're smelling for five hours aren't staying in your conventional stock. Would a pressure cooked stock with 30% less starting liquid result in a more aromatic stock?

Bonus tip: If you're making several gallons at a time, a siphon and sieve make for a quick transfer with very little agitation.

Seriously Delicious Holiday Giveaway: Thermapen Thermometer

Probably a ribeye.

Seriously Delicious Holiday Giveaway: The Baking Steel

Sopressata for me.

Roasted Cauliflower With Pine Nut, Raisin, and Caper Vinaigrette

Damn, I only have a thick metal spatula. Oh well.

Seriously Delicious Holiday Giveaway: Thermapen Thermometer

Either a lamb roast or a Pittsburgh rare thick cut ribeye.

The Food Lab: How To Make Tacos Al Pastor At Home

Oh and I'm digging the Latin American kick you've been on lately.

The Food Lab: How To Make Tacos Al Pastor At Home

Is the acid concentration in the marinade low enough to skirt mushiness or do you just not care because of the salting and packing?

Video: Rick Bayless Makes Roasted Fennel and Apple Guacamole

what do you have too many of in the kitchen?

I seem to accumulate too many people in my kitchen.

Re: Roasted butterflied leg of lamb

The resting keeps it from overshooting during the sear. You want to take it out of the oven while it heats up to 500/550. If you left it in during the ramp up you would overcook a good portion of the leg.

The super high temperature can quickly dry out the surface without driving too much heat back into the interior of the roast. The second rest isn't required since you never give the interior time to heat back up.

The Food Lab's Complete Guide To Pan-Seared Steaks

@Kenji

That's counter intuitive. Craggy, irregularly shaped crystals = less surface contact with the meat. Osmotic action in the salt doesn't seem to be the prime mover in the process. Is this something you know as fact or is it an assumption that demands a rigorous proof?

The Food Lab's Complete Guide To Pan-Seared Steaks

@Kenji

"...and [kosher salt] will also draw more initial moisture out of the meat to dissolve than table salt."

Why is that?

Win Pop Chart Lab's 'Breweries of the United States' Poster

Round Atlanta, Red Brick Brewing.

Cook the Book: 'The Homemade Pantry'

Rye Whiskey though I doubt it is in the book :(

Leg of Lamb and Porchetta side by side.

I'd like to roast a leg of lamb and a porchetta for a party this weekend. I'd like to go low at 200-250F, rest and then blast at 550F them right before my guests arrive.

Since the pork needs to go 30 degrees higher than the lamb would I do better adding the lamb to the oven once the pork hits 90F or putting them in at the same time and pulling the lamb to a heated cooler once it hits temp?

Obviously they will cook at different rates and won't finish at the same time (unless I'm really lucky) but it seems to me that adding the lamb halfway through would have them ready much closer together.
Thanks!

OBoud hasn't favorited a post yet.