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How to Eat Flushing: A One-Day Food Tour of NYC's Greatest Chinatown

Max, Outstanding post and makes me want to shirk all of my responsibilities and run to Flushing right NOW! Can't wait to take your tour and discover new things along the way. Thanks for posting. Kevin

For the Best Food in Bangkok, Hit the Streets

Regarding Kintsukori's comment about Indonesia -- if you go to see Borobudur and Prambanan near Yogyakarta (Java), be sure to check out the bird market in town -- it's one of the most incredible markets I've ever seen, but not for the feint of heart nor for card-carrying PETA members. It's also an open-air food market, and it will amaze you (both positively and negatively) beyond your expectations. If you need a guide let me know -- I have a excellent one who can take you anywhere.

For the Best Food in Bangkok, Hit the Streets

Kenji, Great article -- takes me back to my fun-filled days combing the streets of BKK -- including Soi 38, Chinatown, along the river and in so many other great areas. I've had the same mango sticky rice at the same place as you did -- excellent. And down at the very end of Soi 38 there is a soup woman beneath a little tree mankind what to me was by far the best food along that bustling strip. There are so many no-name little indents alongs the streets and alleys throughout BKK. I love the countless pushcarts selling fresh pomegranate juice when it's in season -- and the way they make it is very cool to watch. One of the most exciting urban food areas -- ugh, makes me soooo homesick for Asia.... Enjoy! K

The Serious Eats Guide to Shopping for Asian Noodles

Hi gamingwithbaby, Thanks for the comments and questions. I agree with what Kenji is saying -- it's really a dish rather than a unique noodle. And the noodle/flavor packs are, indeed, pre-fried and dried. The result is as Kenji stated, and the only thing I would add to that is that the noodles--because of their pre-frying--are pretty high in calories before you even open the pack or add the flavoring (which if is in the package is also very high in sodium). Bottom line: Kenji's mother did it best and made it from "scratch." Sure wish I could have grown up on such awesome eats! Thanks, Kenji, for your input on this. K.

The Serious Eats Guide to Shopping for Asian Noodles

johnnytakes5 -- Oops... that's STRAITSGOURMET.COM (as in Straits Chinese). Seem's I'm having all sorts of typo issues today.... K

The Serious Eats Guide to Shopping for Asian Noodles

Hey johnnytakes5, I just saw your question to Kenji from a few weeks ago about finding kaya in the US. You can order it from a very cool couple I recently met who are importing certain foods from Singapore. Contact Jeremy & Kelly at info@straightsgourmet.com and they can send it to you. If you want, include coupon code Woo2014 for a 14% discount. They lived in SG for a few years and are now back in the States, importing (read: no high shipping costs). Their stuff is the real deal, available in stores in SG, but not here. And their kaya is direct from SG. Tell them I mentioned it to you -- I have no interest in what they do, but would love to let them know that I support their efforts. Enjoy. Kevin
ps, Oh yeah, and sorry about the typo on "banh"....

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