Profile

ElizabethS

Elizabeth is a food marketing grad making her way through the CPG industry...

  • Website
  • Location: New York, NY
  • Favorite foods: I'll try anything save for broccoli and green beans (childhood ruined them for me), but put a plate of pasta in front of me and I'll be VERY happy.
  • Last bite on earth: Proscuitto-flavored kisses from my husband (to paraphrase one of my favorite South Park quotes).

The Pizza Lab: Foolproof Pan Pizza

I haven't had PH Pan Pizza in years, but your opening paragraph immediately brought me back to that red-roofed palace of greasy delights. Definitely saving this for a lazy weekend.

Serious Holiday Giveaway: The Baking Steel

Caramelized onions, fresh figs (or dried, to be honest) and duck prosciutto.

Holiday Giveaway: The Amazing Thermapen Thermometer

Last night's braised quail. I wanted to make sure they weren't crazy-overdone, but they were quite tender thankfully!

Are You Swayed By Fancy Liquor Bottles?

I am a much bigger sucker for a slickly-designed label than a bottle, because I am a typography nerd. There are bottles that have drawn me in for the label and I have to remind myself to look at the price before it goes into the basket. But if you use a good typeface as the centerpiece of your design, I'm going to at least give it a second glance before determining that it's too much out of my price range to buy it then and there (see ri, with the macron over the i). I try to depend on recommendation over label, but I can't say it's not a factor.
;

Weekend Cook and Tell: La Celebración de Cinco de Mayo

@duncan1205: I am totally using that for summer cocktails. That sounds AMAZING.

Are you an onion crier?

Vidalia onions are less-tear-inducing, or so I've been told, especially compared to yellow onions. One thing that helps me with the tearing: sticking your head in a freezer for a few seconds.

I recently discovered food. What should I eat?

Pedialite? Or Ensure? They would be good entry-level food items. And don't forget the box mac and cheese!

Weekend Cook and Tell: Put an Egg on it!

I was craving carbornara, but I'm fussy on where I get my eggs from for that (i.e. if I'm making it, I'm using Greenmarket eggs) so I found a compromise by adding some poached eggs to some drunken pasta with pancetta, inspired in part by a Gina DePalma recipe posted here from a few years ago: http://themanhattanfoodproject.wordpress.com/2012/04/29/04-29-12-dinner-drunken-bucatini-with-poached-eggs-piave-and-pancetta/

How to Make a Perfect Mint Julep

I have a small Kentucky Mint plant that's probably too young to pluck for mint juleps quite yet, but just seeing these photos made me excited to make them soon--even if not on Derby Day.

Prefered brand of yogurt?

Chobani for fruit flavors, and Fage Total (full fat) when I have savory applications. I used to eat Dannon Light & Fit and once I went Greek, I never went back. Even when I have Dannon fruit on the bottom I lament how thin it is!

Kenji's Recipes

I've been saving that ricotta recipe for a rainy day but maybe I'll just make a batch tomorrow for no reason. This thread has inspired me!

5 Essential Vodka Cocktails

I adore Vespers but I haven't had one in ages (I've been on a martini kick and we have no vodka in the house). This needs to not be the case ASAP.

Weekend Cook and Tell: Crack Open a Cold One

I love steaming mussels in beer, my favorite being a couple pounds steamed with some garlic, shallots and a bottle of Victory Golden Monkey (the brewery is within walking distance of my in-laws so we try to visit when we're in the area). You can serve it with fries, with bread, or over pasta or couscous--it's pretty versatile as an appetizer or turned into a main course: http://themanhattanfoodproject.wordpress.com/2010/02/23/02-21-10-dinner-le-victoire-le-victoire-yay-victory-beer/

Spot of Tea: Stash Premium Green Tea

Stash Goji Green is my at-home choice, and at work I like having Republic of Tea's Pomegranate Green, and Tazo Zen is my on-the-go tea because it's tasty and usually easy to find.

SE Staff Picks: Our Favorite Non-Pedestrian Cheeses

Oh, you guys... :) Hilarious!

This Week at Serious Eats World Headquarters

Hi Hambone! You guys pick the best names for dogs. :)

Weekend Cook and Tell: Pizza at Your Place

We haven't tested making pizza in our new, less-awesome oven yet, but now I really, really want to try. The last two we made in NYC were a roasted duck/caramelized onion/fontina cheese pie and a roasted garlic/herb/cacio di Roma pie: http://themanhattanfoodproject.wordpress.com/2011/05/17/05-01-11-dinner-garlic-cheese-and-herb-pizza-and-duck-fontina-and-onion-pizza/

Weekend Cook and Tell: Cookbook Keepers

I left a comment yesterday that I think was eaten due to the link I placed in, but anyway--while I turn to our big encyclopedia-esque books (Gourmet, I Know How to Cook, The Silver Spoon) one of the more surprising essential cookbooks for me is The Barcelona cookbook. I got it not long after we moved to NYC because we went to the New Haven location of the restaurant all of the time and wanted to create some of the tapas we always ordered, but it really did turn into a resource for easy meals and light main entrees in the summer. Molto Italiano is also a key resource because of Mario's header notes--more often than not you feel like he is guiding you through the recipe (especially the difficult parts) and the results are always so satisfying and worth the effort. The same can be said for the Les Halles cookbook--it's where we got our first good roast chicken recipe, and the writing style is so authentically Bourdain you feel compelled to try everything once.

We actually made Barcelona's wild salmon paillards this week and it was a really nice, simple recipe that simply relied on great ingredients to pull off in less than an hour: http://themanhattanfoodproject.wordpress.com/2011/06/17/06-16-11-dinner-wild-king-salmon-paillard-sweet-and-sour-shallots-and-bloomsday/

Weekend Cook and Tell: Cookbook Keepers

I left a comment yesterday that I think was eaten due to the link I placed in, but anyway--while I turn to our big encyclopedia-esque books (Gourmet, I Know How to Cook, The Silver Spoon) one of the more surprising essential cookbooks for me is The Barcelona cookbook. I got it not long after we moved to NYC because we went to the New Haven location of the restaurant all of the time and wanted to create some of the tapas we always ordered, but it really did turn into a resource for easy meals and light main entrees in the summer. Molto Italiano is also a key resource because of Mario's header notes--more often than not you feel like he is guiding you through the recipe (especially the difficult parts) and the results are always so satisfying and worth the effort. The same can be said for the Les Halles cookbook--it's where we got our first good roast chicken recipe, and the writing style is so authentically Bourdain you feel compelled to try everything once.

We actually made Barcelona's wild salmon paillards this week and it was a really nice, simple recipe that simply relied on great ingredients to pull off in less than an hour: http://themanhattanfoodproject.wordpress.com/2011/06/17/06-16-11-dinner-wild-king-salmon-paillard-sweet-and-sour-shallots-and-bloomsday/

Entertainers, Help! Need Appetizer Recipes

What @shady lane said! I can attest that they are also delicious without cheese as well--I will pan-fry mine for about 10 minutes.

Manchego cheese and pineapple on pineapple--if you can get to a store with a good cheese selection, ask for an aged manchego. It's a surprising combination but it works really well.

Spanish tortilla or a fritatta cut into bites--you can make it ahead and serve at room temperature.

Weekend Cook and Tell: Cookbook Keepers

The big encyclopedia-style books like Gourmet and The Silver Spoon are handy when I want to idly flip through a book for inspiration, but one of my more surprising cookbook essentials is the Barcelona cookbook. I got it right after we moved to New York because the restaurant was one of the things I'd miss most about New Haven, but it's become a great go-to resource for interesting weekday meals as well as for making tapas spreads. Yesterday we made salmon paillards and it was such an elegant little plate, but it really didn't take all that much work to pull off. Molto Italiano usually has more complicated recipes, but there is something to be said for that feeling of accomplishment after spending an hour hand-rolling fresh penne, and I love reading his header notes because his enthusiasm is so contagious that he can talk me into trying such a task in the first place.

Goodbye, Dumpling

Oh, Kenji. I am just reading this now and am fighting back some tears. I am so, so sorry for your loss. Dumpling will truly be missed.

Where can I buy fresh horseradish in nyc?

I've seen it at Whole Foods and Westside Market.

Ed Levine's 13 Favorite Frozen Desserts in America

@snoopdogg I'd say that anything from the Creamery is tops--I've never had ice cream that rivaled that place. And Rita's Water Ice is the quintessential summertime treat for hot days.

Weekend Cook and Tell: Eggs Abound

Apologies for a double comment--I got an error the first time. In short, a vegetable tortilla that is particularly delicious that I want to fold into our recipe rotation:

http://themanhattanfoodproject.wordpress.com/2011/03/18/03-06-11-dinner-vegetable-tortilla-and-a-revisit-of-catalan-meatball-soup/

What cities have provided surprising serious eats for you?

A week and a half ago we were on a plane to England for my best friend's wedding in Oxford, and then we were going to finish out our time in London with one of our best friends in college. While Oxford was lovely (many great pubs there, of course), I was so pleasantly surprised by how well we ate in London, especially after being told by several people that the food in the city was disappointing at best--though I credit our lovely host for giving us a proper tour (and also for living near an awesome steakhouse where we ate very well our last night).

Most shockingly, though, was the discovery that I a.) enjoy Marmite (albeit sparingly) and b.) love me some Pimm's Cup No. 1. It definitely made for a very fun trip.

Have any of you been pleasantly (or unpleasantly, for that matter) surprised by the food you encountered on a trip?

Your Top 5 Cookbooks, HIgh Fidelity Style.

In the spirit of High Fidelity (one of my favorite films), I love to ask people to list their top 5 of various categories. So I pose this to you, Serious Eaters: what are your top 5 cookbooks that you could not live without/get all of your best recipes/love unconditionally? (Note: your list does not necessitate that they fall into all three categories).

For me, it would be:

The Barcelona Wine Bar cookbook, as I miss that restaurant something fierce and everything I've made from it has been great. My blog has turned into an accidental "cooking the Barcelona cookbook" site because we've been inspired by them, but I really have no ties other than being a good customer of theirs and they kept me hooked on great Spanish food

The Silver Spoon, as it's the definitive bible of Italian cooking

Think Like A Chef by Tom Colicchio, because it's my go-to for fancy foods, and he writes in a way that is so enjoyable and fun to read

The Wiseguy Cookbook by Henry Hill, because so many great tips in this, plus it's basically an Italian-American 101 cookbook as it's so comprehensive, plus it's bascially Wiseguys lite with extra story on what happens after the novel and movie

I'm Just Here for the Food by Alton Brown, because it's so useful for the cook starting out, especially when it comes to meats. A must-have for any budding cook.

What are yours?

Delicious in Five Minutes or Less: Creamy Scrambled Eggs with Caviar

Last night I went through 72 eggs worth of scrambled eggs doing some recipe research. Of course, the great thing about developing recipes for a living is that when the clock strikes 2 a.m. and you realize you haven't eaten all night, the solution is usually right in front of you. But what to pair with that final batch of ultra-rich and creamy eggs? Most people don't think caviar when searching for a midnight snack, but why not? More

Serious Eats Turns Three: Happy Birthday To Us

©iStockphoto.com/efesan A few years ago I had a dream. About creating an online clubhouse for food, a place that serious eaters could come to share their food enthusiasm. A place serious eaters could come to find out what's going in the world of food and drink, find a recipe, look at a cool food video, get restaurant advice, and, best of all, chew the fat with like-minded folks. Three years ago, that dream, Serious Eats, became a reality. And in those three short years, we've become home base for millions of passionate, discerning, and inclusive food lovers all over the world. Thank you, Serious Eats community. You are the merry band who makes the site feel so alive whenever... More

Openings: Paulie Gee's, Greenpoint, Brooklyn

This has been in the works for some time, but it's now official: Paulie Gee (aka Paul Gianonne) has signed the lease on the former Paloma space at 60 Greenpoint Avenue in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, and is hoping to open Paulie Gee's by December. Anyone familiar with the Paulie Gee mythos won't find it surprising that his place will be a wood-fired Neapolitan-style joint. The oven is being built in Naples now and will be shipped over soon. Gianonne says he'll be the sole pizzaman at Paulie Gee's but will have an assistant trained and ready to step in at... More

When in Rome: Dar Poeta

[Photographs: Nick Solares] Dar Poeta Vicolo del Bologna 45, Rome 00153, Italy; map); 39-06-6830-7769; Pizza Style: Roman Oven Type: Wood The Skinny: Wonderfully prepared Roman-style pizza with a crisp, yeast-free crust and fresh ingredients. The abundance of locals and the Italian-only menu indicate that this is the real deal, not a tourist trap (although they will gladly have you) Price: €6 to €9 It takes a bit of work to find Dar Poeta, tucked away as it is in one of the winding back alleys of the bustling Trastevere District of Rome. You may be seduced by the more... More

Seriously Italian: Mint in Italian Cooking

Note: On Thursdays, Babbo pastry chef Gina DePalma checks in with Seriously Italian. After a stint in Rome, she's back in the States, channeling her inner Italian spirit via recipes and intel on delicious Italian eats. Take it away, Gina! Last week, there was some scuttle on my Twitter timeline about fresh mint. It all started when @ruthreichl tweeted something she picked up from my friend Chris Cosentino of Incanto Restaurant in San Francisco; @offalchris told her that mint was the most widely used herb in Italy. How could that be true? The consensus was that surely basil or rosemary must hold that crown. I’m solidly with Chris on this one. Mint is indeed a universal ingredient in Italian cooking,... More

The Real Emotions Behind the 2009 James Beard Foundation Awards

This year I watched the entire James Beard Foundation Awards ceremony from the ridiculously crowded and cramped press room, located in the bowels of Lincoln Center's Avery Fisher Hall in Manhattan. We all watched the video monitors as the awards unfolded, and when our personal favorites won, started yelling at the screen, the way longtime offtrack betting habitues yell when a race is on. More