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How to Make The Best Chicken Stock

White chicken stock, in which neither the chicken nor the aromatics are roasted first, may be the most versatile of all stocks, enhancing any soup, sauce, or glaze you use it in. It's also incredibly easy to make. Here, we look at some of the factors that lead to a deeply flavorful stock, while keeping the method and ingredients as easy and accessible as possible. Requiring such a minimal investment of time and effort, this stock will upgrade any dish or sauce you make compared to the store-bought variety. More

How Bad Wine Led Me to Great Shrimp Scampi

To get the most flavor in this shrimp scampi, we use vermouth instead of white wine, and a mix of fragrant herbs—parsley, tarragon, and chives—instead of just parsley. The silky butter sauce, meanwhile, is brightened with a splash of fresh lemon juice and fresh lemon zest. It's a quick, easy, one-pot Italian-American classic with just enough extra flavor and flair to make it special. More

How to Make Quick and Easy Italian-American Red Sauce That Tastes Slow-Cooked

There are times when you can stand over the stove all day, slowly cooking that red sauce down. Then there are times when you need to put dinner on the table in under an hour. For those moments when convenience trumps patience, this is the red sauce to turn to. Simmered with plenty of garlic, dried oregano, red pepper flakes, and basil, this sauce can be whipped up in no time but still has that deep, rich, long-cooked flavor. More

How to Make Korean Stir-Fried Pork With Chili Marinade and Kimchi (Jaeyook Kimchi Bokum)

There are too many great meat dishes in the Korean canon to pick a favorite, but this one of stir-fried marinated pork with kimchi is definitely in my top five. Easy to make, it features thin strips of pork shoulder in a spicy-sweet blend of Korean chili paste, garlic, ginger, soy sauce, and sesame oil—plus a bit of Asian pear for both flavor and its tenderizing effect on the meat. More

How to Make Aguachile: The Chili-Spiked Mexican Ceviche

If you love ceviche, then Mexico's aguachile is for you. Traditionally made with raw shrimp, lime juice, chilies, cucumber, and onion, it's served immediately while still totally raw, unlike most other ceviche recipes. It's worth trying the original version, but the dish is a springboard for improvisation. Try the three recipes here, starting from the classic, and then proceeding with two increasingly untraditional versions. More

How to Make the Best Tomato Sauce From Fresh Tomatoes

However many ways there are to skin a cat, I'd wager there's fifty times as many ways to make tomato sauce from fresh—not canned—tomatoes. The best, though, comes from summertime tomatoes at the peak of ripeness, and layers the deeply sweet flavors of long-cooked tomatoes with the fresh, bright, fruity notes of barely-cooked ones. This sauce achieves that, and is so good, you won't even need to put cheese on top. More

Basic Chicken Stock

@deedledum I don't bother removing the claws in this case, since I don't eat the boiled feet (I like chicken feet, but plain boiled ones don't do much for me...my Russian great-grandparents would probably have felt differently about that...). And from what I know, the feet you buy at the store have already been cleaned...and since washing chicken can actually increase the chances of spreading salmonella around your kitchen, i just drop 'em straight into the pot. But, if you really want to de-claw them, we have instructions in this chicken feet dim sum recipe (one of my all-time favorite dishes).

How to Make The Best Chicken Stock

@ehubbard89 Yes, you can. In that case, I might toss the cooked bones/carcass in oil and roast it to get even more browning on it all; roast the aromatics also until well browned, then stir in tomato paste and roast that for a few minutes to improve its flavor, and then transfer to a stockpot, cover with water and cook. Deglaze whatever is in the roasting pan with water and add that to the stock too. It'll be a brown chicken stock.

Basic Chicken Stock

@posterboy I tested sweating the aromatics, but not the chicken, and didn't care for the results. I didn't do any browning here since I was aiming for a fairly neutral white chicken stock--it's great for its versatility...if there's just one stock to have on hand, this might be it, since it can stand in for just about any stock in most recipes, including fish stock. Browning the chicken and aromatics first will lead to a brown chicken stock (also usually has tomato paste). That's a richer stock that's also delicious, but I think a little less versatile and also a little more work.

@zach I've never been very exacting with the chicken feet--I just buy a pound or so and toss them in (frankly, until working on this article, I've never measured my chicken before...I just fill the pot with a good amount of chicken and then add enough water to cover by a couple inches, which has always worked for me as an eyeball method). As long as it all fits in the pot, you'll do no harm to your stock by adding more chicken and aromatics relative to the water...as long as there is enough water to cover everything. As for pressure cooking, I usually do low pressure for about 30-45 minutes, though maybe high pressure would be just as good if not better.

The Key to Great Baked Ziti: Drop the Ricotta (and Add Parmesan Cream Instead)

@eat4good I didn't try freezing the parm cream, so I'm not sure, though dairy, and cheese in particular, doesn't tend to freeze well, so I don't have high hopes for it once frozen.

The Key to Great Baked Ziti: Drop the Ricotta (and Add Parmesan Cream Instead)

@mcwolfe So happy you liked it, that's music to my ears.

How to Make The Best Chicken Stock

@petitegourmand Just to add to what Kenji wrote, another important thing is to make sure your pressure cooker doesn't become over-pressurized since they will automatically vent as a safety precaution. Once they vent, either automatically or manually, you're going to have boiling inside. Electric ones should self-regulate, but stovetop ones require keeping an eye on the pressure and lowering the heat as much as necessary to prevent it from over-pressurizing.

The Food Lab Turbo: How to Make a Simple Salad Worth Eating

@Android I've always found that, if stored in a squeeze bottle, which @kenji alludes to above, it's very easy to give a pre-made vinaigrette a quick shake to bring it back together. But it's true that xanthan holds it together for an insanely long time.

The Food Lab Turbo: How to Make a Simple Salad Worth Eating

@Android Yeah, you're right. I should have written 'hydrocolloid'.

The Food Lab Turbo: How to Make a Simple Salad Worth Eating

@AndroidUser @crooom As far as I know there's nothing wrong with xanthan gum--it's an emulsifier and thickener produced by bacteria. The tiniest amount can help emulsify a sauce, though too much and you have slime on your hands.

Basic Chicken Stock

@fwilger Yes, chicken feet are what I use (I mention them in the main article for this recipe, which you can see here). Since some people can't find, or don't want to go anywhere near, chicken feet, the gelatin is a shortcut to improve the body of an otherwise thin but flavorful stock. But yes, I agree with you, chicken feet really is the easiest and best way to go.

@tkocareli If you're anything like me, then yes, you can use the chicken that's leftover from stock. I've been known to sprinkle salt of the boiled wings and such and just suck the bones clean. I've also shredded the meat and made chicken salad with it, though it's quite a bit of labor if you're using wings alone, so you have to be prepared for that. The meat of a whole chicken is very easy to shred after boiling and use in salads and such. It will be overcooked (not a problem with legs and wings, but not great for breast meat), and not the most flavorful (since you've pulled much of the flavor into the surrounding broth), but it's a shame to just throw all that meat away.

How to Make The Best Chicken Stock

@jedd63 Wings are funny--I usually find them for very cheap, but their prices can sometimes be high. In that case, definitely switch to cheaper parts, or whole or half chickens. I wouldn't use just thighs and legs though, based on my taste tests.

@skananigans Good point-- I hadn't converted my units, so I meant 1:1 in pounds:quarts.

How to Make The Best Chicken Stock

@dishes Yes, it will work with any chicken. I'd also have loved to make all my test batches of stock with chickens that I knew on a first-name basis, but I'd bankrupt the company pretty quickly if I had shopping bills in the hundreds of dollars for a single article on chicken stock.

Pressure-Cooker Butternut Squash Risotto With Frizzled Sage and Brown Butter

@asterik It depends on the model. My stovetop one has a pin that gets pushed up by the pressure inside the cooker. On the pin are two lines, the first of the two represents the low-pressure mark, and the second the high-pressure mark. But other cookers may be different--the owner's manual should explain. Also, some cookers only have one setting, which usually corresponds to low.

Pressure-Cooker Butternut Squash Risotto With Frizzled Sage and Brown Butter

@Tkocareli Yes, this method will work with any flavor of risotto.

How Bad Wine Led Me to Great Shrimp Scampi

@JAPinDC Sorry you didn't like it more. I'm surprised the garlic was lacking in yours. As can be seen in the photos, there's quite a bit of garlic in the dish. Maybe variations in the potency of your garlic versus mine? Anyway, you could increase the garlic a little to get even more in your version if you want it.

As for the tarragon, I didn't think to mention it, but when I make fines herbes, I don't do an even ratio of parsley to tarragon and chives. The tarragon is so much more assertive of a flavor. I lean towards mostly parsley that's accented with the other two. Hope that helps!

Use the Pressure Cooker for a Butternut Squash Risotto Packed With Layers of Flavor

@weltburger. Cool, thanks for answering. Sounds like to you risotto is as much about the journey as the destination. I can't argue with that :)

Use the Pressure Cooker for a Butternut Squash Risotto Packed With Layers of Flavor

@weltburger I'm curious why you think it's not to make a proper risotto in a pressure cooker. I agree that it's not possible to use a traditional risotto technique in a pressure cooker, but the end result and texture in my eyes is absolutely one of a classic risotto, not a pilaf. The grains are cooked al dente, and they are suspended in a thick, creamy sauce. That's risotto, by definition, in my book.

Use the Pressure Cooker for a Butternut Squash Risotto Packed With Layers of Flavor

@beetee81 From what I've read, there's no guarantee that a pressure cooker will have standardized pressure settings, but most do so that recipes will work. If your pressure cooker only has one setting, my understanding is that usually corresponds to the "low" setting on models that have more than one pressure setting.

The Key to Great Baked Ziti: Drop the Ricotta (and Add Parmesan Cream Instead)

@lapsangsouchong That's great, really glad to hear it came out well for you. I went back and forth between putting pepper in the parm cream sauce and not, and ended up deciding to leave it plain old cheesy and creamy. I'm happy to hear you tried it with pepper--I'm sure it rocked that way too (and yes, other ideas for infusing the cream could be very interesting...mushroom cream comes immediately to mind).

The Serious Eats Guide to Italian American Recipes

I'd like to try my hand on an arancini recipe...

How Bad Wine Led Me to Great Shrimp Scampi

@AnnieNT Actually with this method, I tossed the shrimp in the baking soda and salt and let it sit dry, no water. If you click through to the recipe you should see the specific instructions and quantities there.

How Bad Wine Led Me to Great Shrimp Scampi

@porgy I decided not to reduce the wine on the side first because I really wanted this to be a one-skillet dish that can be banged out in rapid succession--just felt like that's what shrimp scampi should be...boom, boom, boom, on the table and done.

But, if people are missing the vermouth, it's a method to try out. (But I'm with you, there's no harm in having some vermouth in the fridge, right?)

How Bad Wine Led Me to Great Shrimp Scampi

@ellebi Sorry, didn't mean to offend. From my time in Italy, those curses were all thrown around liberally and in all sorts of company; maybe I was hanging out with a particularly crass group.

@ocean I may also have done they wine-y thing...thanks for pointing it out.

@androiduser Add my name to the list of people who eat the shrimp, shells and all.

The Key to Great Baked Ziti: Drop the Ricotta (and Add Parmesan Cream Instead)

@dorek I soaked mine longer than Kenji did his, closer to the full 90 minutes for full hydration. The short answer of why I didn't go back at this method was I was up against a deadline and needed to not lose too much time on that one element of the recipe, so I defaulted to the technique that I knew I could make work. It's not really much extra effort to par-boil the pasta, so it's not a big deal in this case I don't think, though, like you, I'm curious to explore this technique a little more so that I understand how to use it in the future successfully.

Taste Test: Is Domestic Parmesan Cheese Worth Using?

@saqibsaab I don't have deep enough first-hand cheese-making experience to give you a good answer about rennet's effect on flavor and texture. I've never done a side-by-side. My guess is that if you know what to look for, you may be able to detect differences depending on how the milk was coagulated, but to an untrained palate it may be hard given how many other factors influence the final cheese characteristics. Any cheese-makers out there want to weigh in?

The Ultimate Fully Loaded Nachos

What does it take to make an incredible plate of bar-style, fully loaded nachos? For starters, at least three kinds of cheese, two kinds of beans, and two different applications of creamy, tangy dairy. It may sound like overkill, but there's a method to this madness. More