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Ananonnie

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The Best Peach Cobbler Is Also a Simple Peach Cobbler

The sugar cookie topping is super sweet like the one he tested.

The Best Peach Cobbler Is Also a Simple Peach Cobbler

Also while I am in the biscuit camp, I have to admit that cobbler made with a batter that you pour hot water over is actually really good, too. The one I made didn't have nearly as much sugar as the recipe you cited and gets dolloped on top of the fruit. Still prefer biscuit, but it makes a nice alternative.

And I think it's poured cream or ice cream all the way. Whipped cream is for pie or crisp. :p

The Best Peach Cobbler Is Also a Simple Peach Cobbler

I about died at your comment on too much sugar because it's how I feel. I can't abide too sweet desserts, especially ones where the fruit is the star.

I would say though that if you don't have great peaches, make a plum cobbler instead as plums of all kinds are currently wonderful now. And the truth is I think plums (and rhubarb and berries for that matter, also out of season) make much better cobbler than peaches —tarter, brighter, better texture when cooked. Plums are just greatly overlooked in general when it comes to classic American fruit desserts.

Sous Vide Your Way to the Juiciest, Most Flavor-Packed Corn on the Cob

So I guess trying this with ziplocks is a no-go?


At one restaurant they would sous vide cauliflower and I was just beside myself because not only did I find the result to be kind of mushy and not particularly flavorful, but the absolute stench of a newly opened bag of sous vide cauliflower is killer.

Savory Bacon-Cheddar Pancakes With Corn and Jalapeño

These are so delicious! I do just the lightest drizzle of honey because I love the plain pancakes as is.

How to Make a Provençal Vegetable Tian (a.k.a. That Dish From the Ratatouille Movie)

Ratatouille is a stew. Diced vegetables (eggplant, squash, tomato, peppers) cooked into a stew. There's an article about classic ratatouille linked in the introductory paragraph.

The Food Lab: Super-Flaky Buttermilk Biscuits

^ Not really, for example cream scones. There's really not much difference between the two, though typically scones tend to contain cream vs. buttermilk and less butter than biscuits. But there are scones which don't follow those rules at all. I'd say the most consistent difference is that a scone is short in texture whereas with biscuits you're looking for a flaky texture.

Japanese Cotton-Soft Cheesecake

@diannew1235, just use milk. It's what this cake is usually made with.

Meringue Is the Secret to Lighter-Than-Air Japanese Cheesecake

@ Katie Potato, I have the same misgivings. As for the falling I would attribute it to beating the whites to medium peaks, as that would make the cake rise more and then possibly fall. I've always done soft peaks. I don't think the sour cream is an issue. It makes a more acidic batter, but that's pretty marginal. I also wonder about creaming the ingredients, which also incorporates more air.
I like Kitchen Tigress' recipe, though the one linked upthread looks great.

The Food Lab: Super-Flaky Buttermilk Biscuits

@Scoffier, with biscuits it's best to make the dough, cut out the biscuits, and freeze them and bake from frozen. Leaving just refrigerated often leads to flat biscuit.

Easiest Summer Ever: Dress Carrot Salad With a Dab of Tahini

That is a beautiful plate of carrots! And I love the way carrots dressed with tahini taste.
We have the same philosophy about trying foods. There are things I don't like to some degree or another, but I'm always willing to try again and in different applications. I'm even willing to give durian another try if the opportunity presents itself and that was a rather unpleasant experience…

Meringue Is the Secret to Lighter-Than-Air Japanese Cheesecake

@pdedge I wouldn't put a crust on this. It really isn't custardy the way an American cheesecake is. For me at least, the crust would just distract from the texture and lightness and add extra sweetness.

Meringue Is the Secret to Lighter-Than-Air Japanese Cheesecake

I've always made this with milk and by basically melting the ingredients. Curious to try sour cream now!

Pass the Ketchup: How to Make Better Mexican-Style Shrimp Cocktail

^savory food, I assume is what you mean, since Mexican (and Latin American in general) sweets are SWEEEEEEEEET!

Embrace the Wobble: Why I Love Jellied Foods and You Should Too

^Yeah I do think mochi doesn't necessary fit in with the others. Tapioca has a slipperiness that's kind of similar to the others though?

The Food Lab's Guide to Crispy Sous-Vide Chicken Thighs

@weavin, we use to freeze sous vide chicken breast at one place and it worked just fine.

Embrace the Wobble: Why I Love Jellied Foods and You Should Too

Niki, the first time I had stir-fried rice cakes, it was love at first bite. So I was shocked when I had a friend try and he said they weren't to his liking. I can't get enough of chewy nian gao! I get intense cravings for them pretty often.
Now I want mochi ice cream…

Embrace the Wobble: Why I Love Jellied Foods and You Should Too

Also, don't forget chicken feet! One of my favorite dim sum items!

Embrace the Wobble: Why I Love Jellied Foods and You Should Too

Right there with you! Love tripe stew that also includes some pig's feet that get all sticky and gelatinous. Pig's ears, too!
I made drunken chicken and I thought how the best part is indeed the gelled stock and wine.
And I have a whole thing about how froyo without mochi isn't worth eating. If a place doesn't have mochi, I'm out!

Easiest Summer Ever: Braised Long Beans With Tomatoes and Garlic

@thatguyfromvienna, true, but so do Italians, and I tend to think more of dried mint for Turkish cuisine (though I know fresh is used, too).

Easiest Summer Ever: Braised Long Beans With Tomatoes and Garlic

I love green beans braised luke this! I usually think of this prep as Turkish (with the addition of a teensy bit of sugar), until you got to the mint, which for me is definitely an Italian touch.

The Food Lab's Guide to Crispy Sous-Vide Chicken Thighs

And Kenji, I was always suspicious of people recommending 140 for thighs because of the connective tissue, so I'm glad to see that confirmed. I feel like there's a bit of an obsession to cook everything low temperature with sous vide. Even things like corned beef brisket I see people cooking at 140.

Tour Guide and Author Lesley Tellez on What Everyone Gets Wrong About Mexican Food

I don't think it's a pissing contest, just that these kinds of articles fall flat imo. I know people who are so woefully uninformed about food, but it's all food, not just one cuisine. These are people who ask what asparagus is upon seeing it even though they've lived here for years or their whole lives. Those people aren't reading Serious Eats or anything food-related, though.

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