Cooking and Baking

How to make DIY seitan fattier?

I cook regularly for my vegetarian girlfriend and vegetarian housemate, and pretty much know my way around the standard veggie proteins and mock-meat products. Sometimes I make seitan (starting with powdered wheat gluten) to use as a meat-substitute in various usually-meaty applications (seitan pot roast, seitan banh mi, seitan gyros, etc.) These are always slightly disappointing, because the texture always seems too dry/not fatty enough to me (though the vegetarians are always happy with it), even when I've pan fried slices of the seitan in coconut oil or butter. This is especially true in sandwich situations where there's already a bunch of bread in the mix.

If any of you all are experienced seitan makers or just know about gluten and chemistry: do you think there's a good/best way to incorporate fat into the seitan? Like putting oil directly into the dough mixture? Or into the broth when it's boiling? Or maybe slicing it after the fact and making seitan confit? It looks super porous. Some of that fat would have to absorb, right?


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