Pizza

More on Fixing those Oh, [deleted]!! type Errors

Errors happen, but most can be fixed. A few weeks ago a poster asked about fixing a dough that had been fully mixed, but without the yeast. The fix was simple: add the yeast, mix just until incorporated and ferment in the fridge for one's usual period. Ha-ha. I pulled a similar stunt the other day. I usually make double or larger batches of dough, ferment for 24-48 hours then divide and freeze, allowing for more maturation time after thawing. Expanding my horizons a bit, I was (again) using @dmcavanagh's sourdough formula from this site. I'm a big fan of SD, but I use it differently. My 'starter' is more like a sponge because I use a LOT of it. @dmc's formula called for 1 cup (as doubled, here) but I used 3 cups. After mixing it with the (doubled) 960g of bread flour I simply added water (about 1.25 cups) until the dough was right. Several reasons: I like the SD flavor, my starter is 100% White WWF and is often the 'vehicle' for adding a whole grain component. The starter is usually 100% or higher hydration, so the water must be considered. I did not want to add commercial yeast this time and I wanted *at least some* of the dough to be usable in about 24 hours. Basic mixing, a rest to hydrate the flour and then proper machine mixing/kneading time. To speed up the process a bit, since I was not using any commercial yeast, I intended to add the salt at the last instant. You know- I forgot! I decided to work some in later, when the dough was coming to room temp. While it did work, I would not call it ideal. @dmc's formula is darn near perfect, but is DOES need that salt! Let's just say that the late-added yeast fix was probably more effective. Every pizza is a work in progress!


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