'winter drinks' on Serious Eats

DIY vs. Buy: How to Make Advocaat, Dutch Eggnog

When I was a kid, Dutch relatives would bring my family all the treats that were hard to find here in the states. My favorite was hagelslag, which are candy sprinkles that you put on buttered bread. (Boxes of hagelslag guaranteed that I would be allowed to eat candy for breakfast.) The grownups, however, got all excited about a ochre-colored liqueur called advocaat. It looked like an avocado-and-mustard milkshake to me, so when they'd pour themselves a big glass for Christmas, I was never tempted to sneak a sip. After all, these were the same adults who'd rave about salty black licorice, which I knew for a fact was the worst thing I'd ever tasted. More

3 Hot Drinks from Vandaag in New York City

"I almost always find hot drinks disappointing," says Martim Smith-Mattsson, beverage director at New York's Vandaag in the East Village. "So many just taste like they've been sitting on a warmer all day. I wanted to make something fresher, more vibrant." Check out his unusual recipes for hot cocoa, hot cider, and a very loose interpretation of a hot buttered rum. More

How to Make Your Own Masala Chai

The spices that make up traditional masala chai usually include some combination of five basic spices: cardamom, ginger, clove, black pepper, and cinnamon. Other spices and flavorings may include anise, fennel, nutmeg, vanilla, coriander, allspice, bay leaves—you get the idea. Some people really empty out the whole spice rack here. More

Evergreen Dazed

All cranberry and pine, this would be an excellent holiday punch, light but complex and with distinctly winter flavors; I like that the cranberry flavor comes from a liqueur rather than just juice, keeping that intense tart flavor without diluting the drink. More

Winter Drinks With Will: The Dead Leaf

This is my favorite time of year for many reasons, none of which involve snow or gourds and several of which involve whiskey. This time of year, bourbon is ready to be tricked out with something more interesting than summer's ice-and-soda or deeper winter's tumbler-and-depression. The Dead Leaf is what I've come up with, and it's good. More

Flaming Holiday Punch

I've been mixing variations of a Flaming Holiday Punch (known in some circles as "English Bishop") every December for years now. The base recipe is from Esquire's Handbook for Hosts, from 1949, which is nice on its own but quite open to improvisation. The ingredients are a cinch: a bottle of aged rum poured into a punch bowl over baked oranges studded with cloves. Toss in a little sugar and some holiday spice, turn down the lights before you apply a match to the hot liquid (careful!) and conversation is pretty much guaranteed to stop. More

Mexican Hot Chocolate

What is better during the holidays than a piping mug of hot chocolate? Well, one that's been enhanced with cinnamon and cayenne powder of course. This Mexican take on the wintry beverage is creamy and rich with a spike of spiciness. Top it with whipped cream, marshmallows or whatnot. More

Hot Coffee Grog

If there's been one simple message that's come out of the Four Loko hullaballoo, it's that mixing caffeine and alcohol is a bad idea. Now that this preliminary is out of the way, let's get down to doing that very thing. There are plenty of versions of the Hot Coffee Grog floating around in the booze world. Some contain cream or butter (or, in one tiki-fied version, coconut cream), and some are laced with a range of liqueurs. More

How to Make Spiced Rum From Scratch

Making spiced rum is deliriously easy. Simply take your desired mix of spices and other ingredients, pop them in a bottle of rum for, oh, two days, then taste. Need the spice mix a bit stronger? Let it sit a day or two more, or, edit the taste profile as you go, adding more of an ingredient if you wish to push it forward. More

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