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Bánh Mì with Pickled Japanese Turnips from 'Little Jars, Big Flavors'

Cook the Book Kate Williams Post a comment

For this bánh mì adaptation in Southern Living's Little Jars, Big Flavors, the traditional mix of shredded pickled carrot and daikon is swapped out for pickled turnips with shiso. On the sandwich, the small pieces of spicy, lemony turnips contrast delightfully with the soy-slicked pork cutlets and rich liverwurst mayonnaise, adding brightness and a bit of crunch. More

Bánh Mì with Pickled Japanese Turnips from 'Little Jars, Big Flavors'

Serious Eats Kate Williams Post a comment

For this bánh mì adaptation in Southern Living's Little Jars, Big Flavors, the traditional mix of shredded pickled carrot and daikon is swapped out for pickled turnips with shiso. On the sandwich, the small pieces of spicy, lemony turnips contrast delightfully with the soy-slicked pork cutlets and rich liverwurst mayonnaise, adding brightness and a bit of crunch. More

Pickled Japanese Turnips with Shiso from 'Little Jars, Big Flavors'

Serious Eats Kate Williams 2 comments

Pickles are usually the easiest thing to put up, and the vinegar-ed recipes in Southern Living's Little Jars, Big Flavors, fall in line. Most of the pickles are simple, familiar choices like dills, bread and butters, and pickled green beans. This pickled turnip with shiso, however, stood out from the rest. Shiso is not ordinarily seen in American pickle recipes, especially from the dill- and mustard-focused South. Still, the lemony leaf makes plenty of sense in these Japanese-esque white wedges. More

In a Pickle: Pickled Harukei Turnips

In a Pickle Marisa McClellan 3 comments

The Hakurei turnip is a small, creamy, white-fleshed turnip that looks more like a radish than it does its larger kin. They can be eaten raw, braised, or pickled. More

Pickled Hakurei Turnips

Serious Eats Marisa McClellan Post a comment

The Hakurei turnip is a small, creamy, white-fleshed turnip that looks more like a radish than it does its larger kin. They can be eaten raw, braised, or pickled. More

The Art of Eating's Turnip Gratin 

Serious Eats Caroline Russock Post a comment

The gratin has the ability to elevate even the most humble of vegetables, even the oft overlooked turnip. This Turnip Gratin from Edward Behr's The Art of Eating Cookbook smothers sweet, thinly sliced turnips in a very special béchamel. Instead of the standard that's always rich but often a little bland, this version calls for a slow cooked béchamel that's infused with onion, clove, bay leaf, and ham. More

In Season: Turnips

In Season Jenny Lee-Adrian 9 comments

Turnips are vegetables that don't mind the cold at all. If turnips grew in temperatures over 80 degrees Fahrenheit, the turnips would mature too soon, becoming bitter and woody, according to the National Gardening Association. Available year-round in retail grocery stores, peak supplies of the root vegetable run from October to March. More

Cook the Book: Cucumber and Turnip Salad with Yuzu

Serious Eats Caroline Russock 4 comments

Thinly sliced cucumber and turnips are massaged with salt to eliminate some of their moisture, then dressed with a mix of yuzu zest and juice for a bright, citrusy pickle that retains its crispness beautifully. This salad acts as equal parts vegetable, condiment, and palate cleanser making it a wonderful bento companion for any of the Japanese-inspired proteins in The Just Bento Cookbook. More

Dinner Tonight: Ensalada Rusa

Serious Eats Nick Kindelsperger 9 comments

This is a straight-up old-school salad, complete with a mayonnaise dressing and a frivolous romaine leaf garnish. There are no spices, citrus, or even herbs. So why did my wife and I devour a bowl of it the other night? More

The Crisper Whisperer: Gobble-Worthy Cruciferous Side Dishes

Crisper Whisperer Carolyn Cope 1 comment

This week's column goes out to all you brave soldiers of turkey day who volunteered to bring the vegetables. Sure, you could have made the stuffing to end all stuffings, or the deep-fried turkey that blew a hole through the backyard shed. But you're making the vegetables instead. And with these recipes in your arsenal, you'll blow away your friends and family anyway. More

Cook the Book: Asian Fried Turnip Paste

Serious Eats Caroline Russock 10 comments

Asian Fried Turnip Paste might just be the most unappealing recipe title ever. Turnips? (Those pale root vegetables that have never won me over?) And paste, more of a minty glue substitute than a food. Honestly, it sounded horrible until I looked at the photo accompanying the recipe—a beautiful plate of perfectly fried turnip cakes garnished with fresh cilantro leaves and finished with soy sauce. More

Cook the Book: Moroccan-Style Braised Vegetables

Serious Eats Caroline Russock 3 comments

I made these Moroccan-Style Braised Vegetables from In The Green Kitchen by Alice Waters as something of a detox dinner after an intense week of restaurant meals. I was looking for a dish that wouldn't leave me with the food hangover I had been suffering from after all those great albeit meat-heavy meals. The stew is flavored with Moroccan spices that are warming, spicy, and deeply-flavored—and you won't even miss the meat or dairy. More

In Season: Turnips

Claire Sellers 8 comments

[Flickr: Esteban Cavrico] In season from October through March, turnips are a root vegetable characterized by a white spherical shape, a crowning blush of purple, and a leafy green stem. First cultivated in prehistoric times, turnips gained popularity during the Middle Ages as a main vegetable for the poor. Turnip recipes, tips, and ideas, after the jump.... More

Irish Carve Turnips Instead of Pumpkins

Erin Zimmer 1 comment

Carved turnip with vision troubles. Photograph from soozums on Flickr My Irish kin have some interesting Halloween customs, including turnip-o-lanterns. The jack-o-lantern creation story actually starts with a turnip in Ireland during the 18th century. A blacksmith named Jack dropped a coal ember into a gouged-out turnip, and so it began. When Irish immigrants arrived in America, they substituted turnips with pumpkins—much plumper, and thus, better carving potential.... More

Turnip, Apple, and Jerusalem Artichoke Soup

Serious Eats Lucy Baker 1 comment

The following recipe is from the September 17th edition of our weekly recipe newsletter. To receive this newsletter in your inbox, sign up here! The unique flavor of turnips is at once sweet and bitter. While they are available year-round,... More

Cook the Book: Five-Spice Duck Legs with Buttered Turnips and Fried Ginger

Serious Eats Lucy Baker 2 comments

Today's Cook the Book recipe, excerpted from A Platter of Figs by David Tanis, is for Five-Spice Duck Legs with Buttered Turnips and Fried Ginger. Don't be put off by the fussy, fusion-sounding name; David assures that this dish is... More

Dinner Tonight: Honey-Glazed Turnips Wedges

Serious Eats Nick Kindelsperger 3 comments

The last time I had turnips the weather was cold. I was surprised by how great a turnip could taste; they warmed my insides and made me real happy. It's for that reason that I still associate them with the... More

The Cartoon Kitchen: Turnips Anna

Serious Eats Ed Levine Post a comment

This week's Cartoon Kitchen features Serious Eats' cartoonist in residence Larry Gonick's spin on turnips. —Ed Levine... More

Dinner Tonight: Turnip 'Risotto'

Serious Eats Nick Kindelsperger 6 comments

It wasn’t until recently that I realized the term "risotto" could be applied to all sorts of dishes that didn’t have an ounce of rice involved. It’s a liberating idea in theory, but one I haven’t really followed through with... More

Cook the Book: Turnip and Potato Gratin

Serious Eats Adam Kuban 3 comments

This week's Cook the Book entry, How to Pick a Peach by Russ Parsons, is all about where the foods in the produce aisle come from, when they're at their best, and how to pick a prime example of whatever... More

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