'truffle oil' on Serious Eats

Mushroom Stew from 'Stewed'

Wintertime vegetable soups all to often tend towards the creamy, orange, winter squash/carrot type. And while there's nothing wrong with a well-made butternut squash puree, sometimes a little more texture and funk is in order. Enter Dave Becker's standout Mushroom Stew in his new book, Stewed. This is a terrific amalgamation of wild mushrooms, enokis, dried porcinis, sherry, and spinach that tastes earthy in the best way possible. More

Mushroom Stew from 'Stewed'

Wintertime vegetable soups all to often tend towards the creamy, orange, winter squash/carrot type. And while there's nothing wrong with a well-made butternut squash puree, sometimes a little more texture and funk is in order. Enter Dave Becker's standout Mushroom Stew in his new book, Stewed. A terrific amalgamation of wild mushrooms, enokis, dried porcinis, sherry, and spinach, this stew tastes of earth in the best way possible. The mushrooms are sauteed in a ripping hot pot to brown quickly without steaming, and are then simmered to tender perfection. A (very slight) drizzle of truffle oil (haters, don't hate) and a smattering of Asaigo cheese enlivens the stew upon serving. More

Poll: Truffle Oil on Pizza - Way or No Way?

[Photograph: Robyn Lee] In an epic Serious Eats rant this spring, Kenji took truffle oil to task and named pizza as one of the greatest remaining victims of the stuff. What say you: Does truffle oil increase or decrease pizza's appeal? Truffle oil: way or no way?online surveys... More

Rant: Enough With The Truffle Oil Already

For some reason, back in the '90s, truffle oil became an acceptable—even desirable—ingredient for chefs to use. Coming in at a fraction of the cost of real truffles (which vary year to year, but generally run in the thousands-of-dollars-per-ounce range), it seemed like an easy way to add some truffle aroma to an otherwise boring dish. But here's the truth: It's no good. More

Truffle Oil Madness: I'll Have the Petroleum Product Pasta

For years a few informed chefs and food writers have been railing about the indiscriminate use of truffle oil not principally derived from truffles, in restaurants fine and not so fine. Now Daniel Patterson has let the foul, truffle-like aroma out of the bag. Patterson says, "Most commercial truffle oils are concocted by mixing olive oil with one or more compounds like 2,4-dithiapentane (the most prominent of the hundreds of aromatic molecules that make the flavor of white truffles so exciting) that have been created in a laboratory. Many chefs regard it as a cheap thrill for both the kitchen and the diner. As S. Irene Virbila, chief restaurant critic of the Los Angeles Times, said in an e-mail, "Chefs... More

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