'tomato sauce' on Serious Eats

The Food Lab: Use the Oven to Make the Best Darned Italian American Red Sauce You've Ever Tasted

This is red sauce. The slow-cooked, rib-sticking Italian-American stew designed to fill you up with equal parts flavor and pride. It's the kind of sauce for which you open up the windows while you're cooking just to make sure that everyone else in the neighborhood knows what you're up to. It's the kind of sauce you want your meatballs swimming in, your chicken parm bathed in, and the sauce that you want not just tossed with your spaghetti, but spooned on top in quantities that'd make a true Italian cry out in distress. The kind of sauce that tastes like it took all day to make, because it really took all day to make. And the best part? This version is worth every minute. More

The Best Slow-Cooked Tomato Sauce

This rich and hearty red sauce tastes like it's been cooked for hours, because it has. The secret to rich, naturally sweet, complex flavors is to cook the sauce in the oven, allowing the surface to brown while the sauce slowly concentrates. The resultant sauce is great on pasta, with meatballs, on your chicken parm, or scooped right out of the pan with a spoon on its own. More

Sardines in Spicy Tomato Sauce from 'The Adobo Road Cookbook'

For Marvin Gapultos, canned sardines in tomato sauce were the ultimate bachelor comfort food. These days, however, he has ditched the can for a fresh version featured in his new cookbook, The Adobo Road. His sauce is a perfect example of the melting pot of culinary influences in the Philippines: tomatoes from the Americas, smoked paprika and white wine from Spain, and fish sauce and calamansi lime juice from Southeast Asia. Fresh sardines quickly broiled atop the fragrant sauce are a step above the canned variety and just as effortless to prepare. More

Sardines in Spicy Tomato Sauce from 'The Adobo Road Cookbook'

For Marvin Gapultos, canned sardines in tomato sauce were the ultimate bachelor comfort food. These days, however, he has ditched the can for a fresh version featured in his new cookbook, The Adobo Road. His sauce is a perfect example of the melting pot of culinary influences in the Philippines: tomatoes from the Americas, smoked paprika and white wine from Spain, and fish sauce and calamansi lime juice from Southeast Asia. Fresh sardines quickly broiled atop the fragrant sauce are a step above the canned variety and just as effortless to prepare. More

Poll: Sugar in Tomato Sauce, Way or No Way?

Is that a hardworking teaspoon of sugar just mindin' it's own business OR is it the shot heard 'round the world? If you frequent Slice, you may have spotted the recent re-emergence of a longstanding debate regarding Kenji's New York style pizza sauce. The recipe calls for a modest addition of sugar, and a whole lot of folks are just not having it. So, we want to know. Is that (biggish) pinch of sugar no big deal or utter, heinous blasphemy? More

Charles Phan's Hoi An Wontons with Spicy Tomato Sauce

As Charles Phan explains in Vietnamese Home Cooking, Chinese cuisine has a strong influence in certain places in Vietnam like the port town Hoi An. Phan's fried wontons use the same filling as his wonton soup—mainly shrimp, pork, mushrooms, and chestnuts—but here they are sealed like ravioli (no tricky folding!) and fried in canola oil. The richness of the dumplings is balanced with a spicy tomato sauce spiked with fish sauce. More

Charles Phan's Hoi An Wontons with Spicy Tomato Sauce

As Charles Phan explains in Vietnamese Home Cooking, Chinese cuisine has a strong influence in certain places in Vietnam like the port town Hoi An. There, much of the food is a mash-up of cultures (including even Japan), so serving fried wontons is not a major leap, cuisine-wise. Phan's fried wontons use the same filling as his wonton soup--mainly shrimp, pork, mushrooms, and chestnuts--but here they are sealed like ravioli (no tricky folding!) and fried in canola oil. The richness of the dumplings is balanced by serving them with a spicy tomato sauce spiked with fish sauce. More

Lidia Bastianich's Farro with Tuna and Tomatoes

Lidia Bastianich doesn't traffic in trends, so I knew that this recipe in Lidia's Italy wasn't just thrown in to capitalize on farro's recent surge in healthy appeal. As she writes in the caption, it actually came from a restaurant called Le Lampare in Trani, Italy. The tuna, caper, and tomato sauce would probably go well with about any pasta shape (I certainly wouldn't mind it), but seems to really come alive when paired with the farro. More

Sandwiched: Grilled Sausage and Ricotta Pizza Sandwich

This week for Sandwiched, I translated my slice obsession into a sandwich. Instead of a bakery roll, I begin with ready-to-use supermarket pizza dough and baked it on a sheet pan. As an ode to my adoration of Pizza Hut bread sticks, the dough that will act as the hat on these sandwiches is brushed with butter and sprinkled with a mixture of green can Parmesan cheese, dried oregano, and garlic powder. More

More Posts