'sugar snap peas' on Serious Eats

In a Pickle: Quick Pickled Sugarsnap Peas

Though I like them raw or gently sautéed until tender-crisp, one of my favorite things to do to sugarsnaps is to quickly pickle them in a gingery, barely sweetened brine. I make them as a refrigerator pickle so that they keep their crunch and eat them with open-face sandwiches or chopped and tossed with grain salads. More

Quick Pickled Sugarsnap Peas

Though I like them raw or gently sautéed until tender-crisp, one of my favorite things to do to sugarsnaps is to quickly pickle them in a gingery, barely sweetened brine. I make them as a refrigerator pickle so that they keep their crunch and eat them with open-face sandwiches or chopped and tossed with grain salads. More

Dinner Tonight: Amagansett Raw Corn, Tomato, and Snap Pea Salad

When looking for recipes to cook, I sometimes head to Food52 and look for the little widget on the side that tells you how many people are currently viewing their recipes. Big surprise that on a day in early August the most popular recipe was the Amagansett Corn Salad made of raw fresh corn, cherry tomatoes, snap peas, and not much else. The idea of raw corn might seem odd but as long as the corn is super fresh, it's all sweetness. More

Dinner Tonight: Scallops with Asparagus and Sugar Snap Peas

I was sold on this recipe from David Pasternack's The Young Man & the Sea (which, it should be noted, SE overlord Ed Levine co-wrote) from the moment I saw the combination of fresh asparagus and sugar snap peas. Could any recipe scream spring more? Both of them only need a few minutes in a hot pan, and they come out bright green and perfectly tender. Scallops, of course, are always a great addition, and their inherent sweetness really plays well with the vegetables. More

In Season: Sugar Snap Peas

Photo by Jennifer Dickert The last couple of weeks, the greenmarket has been full of piles of sugar snap peas. Sugar snap peas have edible pods and don't require shelling—they're crisp and sweet and perfect for snacking on just as they are. To prepare them, you may need to "string" them by removing the membranous string running along the top of the pod from base to tip. If overcooked, the pods will open so treat with care. Here are a few recipes we think are worth trying this sugar snap pea season:... More

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