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Chinese Velveting 101: An Introduction to Water-Velveting

Daniel Gritzer Post a comment

Velveting meat is a common practice in Chinese stir-fries: By marinating strips of meat with egg white and cornstarch, then dipping it in a hot oil bath before finally stir-frying it, the meat develops a texture that is tender, silky, and smooth. But the hot oil bath is cumbersome for home cooks. Here's how to do it with water instead at home, with just-as-good results. More

How to Make Takeout-Style Kung Pao Chicken

J. Kenji López-Alt 11 comments

As much as I now love real-deal Sichuan kung-pao chicken, my absolute favorite Chinese dish as a kid was this mildly spiced Americanized version—and to be honest, I still love it today. Just because it's a Chinese-American standard, complete with slightly-gloppy-sauce and mild heat doesn't make diced chicken with peppers and peanuts any less delicious. Here's how to make it at home. More

Takeout-Style Kung Pao Chicken (Diced Chicken With Peppers and Peanuts)

Serious Eats J. Kenji López-Alt 1 comment

As much as I now love real-deal Sichuan kung-pao chicken, my absolute favorite Chinese dish as a kid was this mildly spiced Americanized version—and to be honest, I still love it today. Just because it's a Chinese-American standard, complete with slightly-gloppy-sauce and mild heat doesn't make diced chicken with peppers and peanuts any less delicious. Here's how to make it at home. More

The Best Chinese Orange Chicken

Serious Eats J. Kenji López-Alt 1 comment

Crispy chunks of deep-fried battered chicken in a sweet, sour, and savory glaze with complex orange flavor. The Chinese take-out classic, made in your own kitchen. More

The Best Chinese Sesame Chicken

Serious Eats J. Kenji López-Alt 3 comments

Crispy chunks of deep-fried battered chicken in a sweet, sour, and savory glaze packed with sesame flavor. The Chinese take-out classic, made in your own kitchen. More

Chinese Aromatics 101: Stir-Fried Tripe With Pickled Mustard Greens

Shao Z. 5 comments

This dish, from the Hakka Chinese community, is an offal lover's dream: snappy omasum (bible) tripe stir-fried with tart mustard greens, fermented black beans, and red chilies. More

Stir-Fried Tripe With Pickled Mustard Greens and Fermented Black Beans

Serious Eats Shao Z. Post a comment

This dish, from the Hakka Chinese community, is an offal lover's dream: snappy omasum (bible) tripe stir-fried with tart mustard greens, fermented black beans, and red chilies. More

Chinese Aromatics 101: Stir-Fried Shrimp With Eggs and Chinese Chives

Shao Z. 9 comments

This quick-to-cook stir-fry of eggs with shrimp, Chinese chives, garlic, and ginger is popular among Cantonese home cooks for both its ease and wonderful flavor. It's a good example of the mild aromatic flavor base common to Cantonese cooking, here with Chinese chives in place of the more common scallions. More

Stir-Fried Shrimp With Eggs and Chinese Chives

Serious Eats Shao Z. Post a comment

This quick-to-cook stir-fry of eggs with shrimp, Chinese chives, garlic, and ginger is popular among Cantonese home cooks for both its ease and wonderful flavor. It can be made with or without the shrimp, or with sliced roast pork in place of the shrimp. More

Chinese Aromatics 101: The Mild and Aromatic Ginger, Scallion, and Garlic Flavor Base

Shao Z. Post a comment

Does China have an aromatic-vegetable equivalent to French mirepoix? Not exactly, but there are some general categories that are helpful in understanding how Chinese flavor bases work. In the second part of this series, we take a closer look at one of them: The more mild ginger, garlic, and scallion flavor base of Guangdong province's famed Cantonese cooking. More

Stir-Fried Lo Mein With Charred Cabbage, Shiitake, and Chives

Serious Eats J. Kenji López-Alt 11 comments

Quick and easy stir-fried lo mein noodles with cabbage charred until sweet, sauteed mushrooms, and Chinese chives in a light sauce. More

Kung Pao Fish With Dried Chilies and Sichuan Peppercorns

Serious Eats Shao Z. Post a comment

In this variation on Kung Pao chicken, firm white-fleshed fish such as catfish or tillapia is marinated with soy sauce and white pepper, then deep fried until golden. Afterwards, it's stir-fried with classic Sichuan flavors: spicy dried chilies, mouth-numbing Sichuan peppercorns, and garlic. More

Chinese Aromatics 101: Spicy and Sour Stir-Fried Cabbage With Bacon

Shao Z. 3 comments

In this first installment of our series on the most common aromatic flavor bases of Chinese cooking, we look at the famously fiery heat of Hunanese food through the lens of this classic and simple dish of hand-torn cabbage stir-fried with garlic, scallions, and fresh red chilies. More

Chinese Spicy and Sour Stir-Fried Cabbage With Bacon

Serious Eats Daniel Gritzer 6 comments

Hunanese food is famous for its fiery, chili-spiked dishes, and this quick and easy one with hand-torn cabbage, fresh red chilies, garlic, scallions, and bacon, is no exception. In fact, by Hunan standards, this dish is fairly tame. Slightly sour, thanks to the addition of black rice vinegar, the dish is great as part of a multi-course meal where the other dishes are even more intensely flavored and spicy. More

Chinese Greens 101: Three Basic Cooking Techniques for Chinese Greens

Shao Z. 20 comments

What are the most common Chinese greens, and how to cook them? We break it down, with recipes for methods like stir-frying with garlic or fermented black beans, poached and served with a drizzle of oyster sauce, and served in a rich broth. More

Shanghai Baby Bok Choy With Black Bean Sauce

Serious Eats Shao Z. Post a comment

Crunchy and tender baby bok choy goes for a spin with a punchy sauce made with lots of garlic and fermented black beans. It's a flavor-packed stir-fry with minimal prep and all the flavor, minus the gloppy sauce. More

Chinese Greens 101: Spinach and Red Shen Choy in Garlicky Broth

Shao Z. 4 comments

Of all the techniques we've covered in the series so far, this one is the easiest. First you blanch your greens in boiling water. Then you sauté some garlic and add some broth, pour it over the greens, and you're done. I can't think of an easier way to put a delicious side dish on the table. More

Chinese Greens 101: Stir-Fried Beef With Kale and Frisée in Black Bean Sauce

Shao Z. 4 comments

This dish, which is made up of equal parts beef and greens in a light but flavor-packed black bean sauce with garlic doesn't quite qualify as a side dish, and seeing as I'm using a mixture of kale and frisée—two decidedly Western greens—it doesn't quite qualify as "Chinese greens" either. But the basic techniques I use in ut—just a quick stir-fry with no blanching—is a method that works with any kind of hearty green leafy vegetable, whether it's Chinese or not. More

Stir-Fried Beef With Kale and Frisée in Black Bean Sauce

Serious Eats Shao Z. 5 comments

This dish, which is made up of equal parts beef and greens in a light but flavor-packed black bean sauce with garlic doesn't quite qualify as a side dish, and seeing as I'm using a mixture of kale and frisée—two decidedly Western greens—it doesn't quite qualify as "Chinese greens" either. But the basic techniques I use in ut—just a quick stir-fry with no blanching—is a method that works with any kind of hearty green leafy vegetable, whether it's Chinese or not. More

Chinese Greens 101: Stir-Fried Choy Sum With Minced Garlic

Shao Z. 3 comments

Stir-frying in a light sauce flavored with a little soy sauce and a lot of garlic is my go-to method for cooking Asian greens. Quick, simple, and flavorful, it's really hard to go wrong, no matter which greens you decide to cook. More

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