'soy beans' on Serious Eats

Weekend Cook and Tell Round Up: Love For Legumes

Our last challenge for Weekend Cook and Tell was for all of you to share your favorite legume lovin' dishes. We called this Love For Legumes. The result is unanimous. We all hold a special place in our hearts for this versatile and comforting constituent. We received so many amazing posts and shared recipes in response to our weekend cooking call, that my best recommendation to you is - read the full Talk thread! More

Seriously Asian: Natto

For some eaters, natto belongs in the nasty bits category of vegetarian fare. Both beloved and reviled, the fermented soybeans are a staple in traditional Japanese cuisine. To make natto, soybeans are cooked for many hours, then inoculated with bacteria and left to ferment in a temperature-controlled fermentation room. But the smell of natto—like a cross between ammonia and rank Camembert cheese—can be off-putting to those without a love for funky tastes and smells. More

Seriously Asian: Frozen Tofu

My love of frozen tofu began by accident. Stuck with a glut of half-used packages, I threw the tofu into the freezer and promptly forgot about them for weeks. Then, rifling through the fridge one day, I found the blocks tucked away. After tossing them into boiling water, what emerged was some of the most densely-textured tofu I've ever eaten. More

Taste Test: Store-Bought Tofu

Not all tofu is created equal. Some tofu has a mild, sweet beany flavor and a smooth consistency, while other brands have flavor defects and strange textures. Our Seriously Meatless columnist Michael Natkin took one for the team and tried six brands of firm or extra firm tofu to help you out on your next grocery trip. More

Simmered Soybeans (Nimame)

These little soybeans can be soaked overnight, then stewed in dashi, sugar, mirin, and soy sauce. Tiny squares of kelp are simmered alongside the soybeans for an extra boost of umami flavor. It's a simple but utterly delicious dish. More

Staple Ingredients of the Chinese Pantry

Barbara Fisher of Tigers & Strawberries put together a really useful post for people who like to cook Chinese food at home, Staple Ingredients of the Chinese Pantry, in which she discusses her favorite brands, what qualities to look for when buying a particular item and how they're generally used in cooking. What I liked most about her list is that she gives you a short but concise summary of why each item should be a regular fixture in your kitchen. For example, we all know about soy sauce, sesame oil and dried noodles, but have you ever considered fermented black beans? They're "black soybeans which have been cooked, salted and fermented, often with slivers of ginger, and this treatment... More

More Posts