'rye bread' on Serious Eats

Serious Rye Bread

I tend to make fluffy rye breads that are destined for sandwiches, but sometimes I really want a dense, chewy rye. This isn't sandwich bread; it's more a bread you'd slice thin with appetizers or toss in a bread basket. It's not a lightweight bread; it's more serious than that. More

Hint of Rye Bread

[Photograph: Donna Currie] If you don't have a clay baker, you can bake this loaf in a cast iron dutch oven. It won't release steam, but it will retain the moisture from the bread as it bakes. One thing to... More

Sauerkraut Rye

[Photograph: Donna Currie] What Worked: An incredibly tasty bread. What Didn't: A long list of ingredients might make some people think twice about making this. Pumpernickel flour might not be available at the grocery store. Suggested Tweaks: I love caraway,... More

Good Bread: Landbrot

For the last quarter century or so, much of New York City has been a German bread desert. The only way to get a loaf of freshly made bauernbrot was to trek out to Central Queens, where neighborhoods like Ridgewood and Middle Village still cling to vestiges of German ethnic tradition. Luckily, however, tastes change, and that's where David Rothe and Volker Herrmann saw their opportunity. More

Bread Baking: Cocktail Rye Bread

In our house, cocktail rye was typically served as the base for chopped chicken livers or cream cheese, always served open-faced, kind of like the untoasted rye version of crostini. The smaller size of the loaf always made it seem fancier to me. More

Cocktail Rye Bread

[Photograph: Donna Currie] I used pumpernickel flour for this recipe, but I know that most stores don't stock a lot of different rye flours, so use whatever rye flour you have on hand, or whatever you can find. I'm usually... More

Bread Baking: Bread Machine Rye

Christmas is over. You've stuffed yourself with cookies. You're thinking that you'll start eating healthier in the new year. But ... but. There are Christmas leftovers to finish first! Maybe a roast, maybe a ham. A sandwich would be nice. Those leftovers deserve homemade bread. This makes a nice sandwich bread, and it couldn't possibly be easier (as long as you have a bread machine). More

Bread Baking: Rye Chop Bread

It's embarrassing how many types of rye flour I usually have on hand. I love rye. Rye chops aren't a type of flour, though. Essentially they're roughly cut rye berries. They're chunky bits, sort of like the steel cut oats of the rye world. More

A Sandwich a Day: Joe's Special at Joe Jost's in Long Beach, CA

Since 1924, Long Beach locals have been flocking to Joe Jost's, a mellow bar that serves up beers at 29 degrees (they even have a thermometer showing the current temperature) by the schooner along with pickled eggs, chili peppers, peanuts, pretzels, and a delicious little sandwich called the "Joe's Special." For $2.95, bartenders will give you a Polish sausage wrapped in a fresh slice of rye bread, served with Swiss cheese, a pickle and mustard. More

Bread Baking: Malted Barley Dark Rye Sandwich Loaf

For this loaf, I used a pale chocolate malt. The grains smelled a bit like chocolate with a hint of coffee. One of my previous loaves used a darker roasted malt called Pearl Black that smelled very much like roasted coffee and had a much stronger flavor in the finished loaf. If you don't have dark malted barley, you could simply leave it out and use this recipe to make a standard rye. It will be a lot paler, and not as complex, but still a nice loaf of rye. More

Bread Baking: Caraway (Stone-Ground) Rye

There are a lot of different rye flours available, including light rye, medium rye, and pumpernickel flour. However, my local grocery chains tend to have one brand and one type, and that's stone-ground rye. It's a coarser, grittier rye than most of the others that I buy online, but it still makes a nice bread. If your local markets have other varieties of rye flour, use what's available or what you like best. More

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