'red rooster' on Serious Eats

11 Awesome Negroni-Like Cocktails To Try in NYC

If I have one favorite classic cocktail, it's the Negroni—refreshingly bitter, just sweet enough to round out the edges, with complex botanicals and a bright burst of orange oil to set it off. But once you start considering the Negroni as a template, you'll find variations on the theme just about everywhere.

Here are eleven in New York I've loved of late, with spirits ranging from mezcal to genever to bourbon, with every amaro you can think of, and with coffee, beets, dried figs, and roasted oranges all making appearances.

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Hangover Helper: The Bunny Chow From Red Rooster, NYC

The Bunny Chow ($19) at Red Rooster in Harlem may not have too much to do with the original dish from South Africa, but I still appreciate it for two reasons: First, it's a fun nod to the Indian-influenced African cuisine you find all through Harlem, and second, its effect on the Bourbon Negronis ($15) you drank too many of at the bar the night before. More

Red Rooster's Mac and Greens

This mac contains just as much greenery as pasta. Braised collards and bok choy pair perfectly with the gooey cheddar-gruyère-parmesan mix, and the hints of soy and coconut lend rich depth. Green as it may be, this is no health food; there's bacon, heavy cream, and plenty of cheese in each and every nook and cranny. More

Red Rooster's Mac and Greens

Marcus Samuelsson's penchant for Southern American-African-Swedish fusion cuisine always makes him an interesting chef to watch. His recipe for Mac and Greens, adapted in Ellen Brown's Mac & Cheese, fits right into his oeuvre. The recipe title is apt, as his mac contains just as much greenery as pasta. Braised collards and bok choy pair perfectly with the gooey cheddar-Gruyère-Parmesan mix, and the hints of soy and coconut lend glutamate-rich depth. But don't be fooled, this is no health food--there's bacon, heavy cream, and plenty of cheese in each and every nook and cranny. More

On Marcus Samuelsson and Red Rooster: What it Means to Be a Harlem Restaurant

The dust-up between Eddie Huang and Marcus Samuelsson—about Samuelsson's new memoir, Yes, Chef, and the role of Red Rooster in Harlem's food scene—raises some questions that we think about often, about the intersection of "ethnic cuisine" and fine dining. Is Red Rooster a neighborhood restaurant for Harlemites that's also a destination downtowners, or a fancy spot that doesn't belong? More

15 Meatballs in NYC We Love

We never tire of meatballs—be they beef or lamb, pork or veal, all of the above. We've found ones we love on sandwiches and on "sliders," of Mexican and of Swedish persuasion, at pizza joints and lunch counters and pork stores. In the end, we couldn't rank one above the rest—but we can present you 15 meatballs in New York City we love. More

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