'tuna' on Serious Eats

Galician Empanada With Tuna, Onion, and Green Bell Pepper Filling

All the empanadas of Latin America—whether baked or fried, wrapped in a corn or flour dough—can thank the Galician empanada for their existence. Unlike the individual hand pies of Latin America, this empanada is formed as a large baked pie with a wheat crust and filled with onions, green peppers, and your choice of protein. Only after it's baked does it get cut into individual portions. Here's how to make it at home with a classic tuna filling. More

Spanish Tuna-Stuffed Piquillo Peppers (Pimientos del Piquillo Rellenos de Atún)

The Spanish are masters at packing RDS (Really Delicious Stuff) into cans. When I'm drinking a glass of sherry or a Rioja with my wife Adri, I could be content with a good loaf of bread, some excellent olive oil, and some RDS. This recipe—pimientos del piquillo rellenos de atún (that's Spanish for "peppers with some well-dressed tuna shoved inside'em")—requires two jars of RDS: piquillo peppers and oil-packed bonito tuna. But it still takes all of 15 minutes to put together. More

Tartine Bakery's Tuna Tartine

If you've ever gotten the slightest bit interested in the art of making bread, chances are you've heard of Tartine, in San Francisco; they're widely known for making some of the best in the country. But the name Tartine is actually loosely translated as open-faced sandwich, and that's the sort of recipe featured in Edible Selby, a recently published compendium of photographer Todd Selby's whimsical columns regularly published in T: The New York Times Style Magazine. More

Lidia Bastianich's Farro with Tuna and Tomatoes

Lidia Bastianich doesn't traffic in trends, so I knew that this recipe in Lidia's Italy wasn't just thrown in to capitalize on farro's recent surge in healthy appeal. As she writes in the caption, it actually came from a restaurant called Le Lampare in Trani, Italy. The tuna, caper, and tomato sauce would probably go well with about any pasta shape (I certainly wouldn't mind it), but seems to really come alive when paired with the farro. More

Tuna Cashew Casserole

There are many different variations of this recipe. Where I added cannellini beans, some people use water chestnuts or chopped green pepper. You can also try cream of celery soup instead of cream of mushroom. Some people even use broken ramen noodle bits instead of chow mein noodles. More

The Art of Eating's Swordfish with Olives, Celery, Garlic, Vinegar, and Mint 

Swordfish is not a fish that needs to be treated with a gentle hand. It's firm, steaky flesh and strong flavors can stand up to virtually anything you throw at it. In fact, not too many other fish in the sea could stand up to the classically Sicilian Pesce Spada alla Stemperata or Swordfish with Olives, Celery, Garlic, Vinegar, and Mint. Edward Behr adapted this recipe for The Art of Eating Cookbook and it's full of those big, punchy elements that swordfish thrives on: vinegar, capers, onions, garlic, and raisins. More

French in a Flash: Niçoise Panzanella Bread Salad

Salade Niçoise is iconic, as is the Pan Bagnat which is just a Salade Niçoise sandwich. This is somewhere in the middle: a bread salad full of all the flavors that make a Salade Niçoise a Salade Niçoise: cherry tomatoes, tender blanched haricots verts, anchovies, garlic, lemon, olive oil, thyme, basil, and the best part, albacore in olive oil. More

French in a Flash: Moroccan Spiced Seared Rare Tuna

This simple but special rare seared tuna is coated in ras-el-hanout and marinates for hours so the spices can really penetrate the outer flesh of the fish. Then it gets a quick sear, is sliced up and served with spicy harissa instead of wasabi, and lemon wedges instead of soy sauce. It's like my French Moroccan interpretation of tuna tataki. More

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