'tahini' on Serious Eats

Chicken Salad with Tahini-Yogurt Dressing

Chicken Salad is great and all, but it's definitely been done. You can vary the ingredients a little bit—grapes and slivered almonds is one of my favorites—but the basic chicken + mayo base doesn't change much. And frankly, it gets a little boring. Which is why this recipe from Patricia Wells is so intriguing. More

Cook the Book: Crunchy Red Swiss Chard Falafel 

I'm a fan of the falafel, the bright green variety. The crisp little chickpea fritters are brightened up with tons of finely chopped parsley and cilantro, and the added greenery does wonders for what can sometimes be a dauntingly dense sandwich. Silvena Rowe, author of Purple Citrus & Sweet Perfume has taken the green falafel concept one step further with these fantastically light Crunchy Red Swiss Chard Falafel. More

Chile Chicken Wings with Creamy Cucumbers

They're an advanced riff on classic spicy Buffalo wings with blue cheese and celery sticks—fried wings sauced with a sweet-hot chile glaze and cooled with a salad of crisp cucumbers in a minty yogurt sauce. The secret to the chile sauce is the unexpected addition of tahini—its nuttiness rounds out the rest of the Asian-inspired ingredients, giving the sauce a great thickness, perfect for coating. More

Dinner Tonight: Chicken with Roasted Cauliflower and Tahini Sauce

I am a well-roasted cauliflower fanatic. It's one of my favorite vegetables to roast. Roasting can bring one of the most boring vegetables to life. Gorgeous nutty aromas start coming out, the color changes to brown, and the flavor transforms from flat to multidimensional. So I was all over this recipe from Saveur, which roasted the vegetable with a dusting of cumin in a 500°F oven and served it with a tahini sauce. My only question was how to make this more of a main dish. More

Scooped: Carrot Halvah Ice Cream

Carrots may sound like an odd dessert ingredient, but they're certainly not just health food. They're starchy and sweet, and when cooked down slowly with milk, practically become candy on their own. Consider them an alternative sweetener, like honey, but with an even more complex sweetness. In a dessert, carrots can build a mild but flavorful base for more intense ingredients to play. Our result is something of a hybrid between Indian and Middle Eastern halvah. More

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