'sous vide' on Serious Eats

Sous-Vide Turkey Breast With Crispy Skin

Sous-vide is a fantastic method for cooking holiday roasts. It delivers reliable moist and tender results, frees up your oven for other tasks, requires almost no supervision while cooking, and is very easy to hold hot and ready to serve until your guests are ready. That said, sous vide turkey comes with a few problems. We've solved the issues to give you a recipe that produces turkey cooked exactly how you like it, with deep roasty flavors and extra-crispy skin to boot. More

Sous-Vide City Ham With Balsamic Brown Sugar Glaze

Ham is not for everyone, but if you're a ham lover, lucky you, because ham is one meat that's darn difficult to mess up. Want to make it even juicier and more foolproof? Cook the sucker sous-vide. Because hams are pre-cooked, it's really just a matter of reheating them. Typically, I'd suggest removing meat from its retail packaging, seasoning it, then re-sealing it in a sous-vide bag before cooking it. But since ham's pre-seasoned, it can be cooked directly in the package it comes in, making the whole process even more appealing. More

Sous-Vide 101: Duck Breast

As a meat that is best served medium rare, duck breast makes an ideal candidate to cook sous-vide. By cooking it at 135°F for two hours, much of the fat under the skin begins to soften and render out while the proteins in it begin to set, making it much easier to crisp without shrinking on the stovetop just before serving. More

Sous-Vide 101: Spicy Rubbed Pork Chops with BBQ Sauce

Modern pork chops are not forgiving. Back in the day, pigs used to be tough and fatty. They walked five miles each way through sleet and snow in bare feet just to get to the slop pit. They were lucky to get a single patch of dry mud to roll in. You could cook the bejeezus out of their loins and they'd still be juicy (albeit tough) from all the melted fat and connective tissue. Today's pampered pigs, on the other hand, are lean, white, and delicate. Overcook them just a shade, and you're left masticating wet cardboard. Enter sous-vide. More

Sous-Vide Steaks

Note: The science behind sous-vide is fascinating. Check it out here. About the author: After graduating from MIT, J. Kenji Lopez-Alt spent many years as a chef, recipe developer, writer, and editor in Boston. He now lives in New York... More

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