'shellfish' on Serious Eats

Crispy Pan-Fried Noodle Cakes With Seafood

Crispy and a little saucy, egg noodles pan-fried until they form a crispy-on-the-outside, tender-in-the-middle cake is a classic Hong Kong and Guangzhou dish. A nest of egg noodles are fried in a wok until golden brown and topped with a combination of stir-fried meat, seafood, or vegetables. Here's how to make my favorite version, topped with seafood in a light gravy. More

Stuffed Mirliton from 'Treme'

Before opening up the new Treme cookbook, I couldn't pick out a mirliton if it was thrown in my face. But the squash, originally native to the region, appears so frequently in Treme, I now consider myself a relative expert. I had, as it turns out, known the squash by its other name, chayote, and it appears on Latin American menus just as frequently as the traditional Louisiana ones. More

Thai Pomelo and Shrimp Salad (Miang Som O)

I used to call miang "one-bite salad," but I'm rethinking it as it seems to suggest that you're supposed to wrap the whole thing up into a big bundle and eat it in one bite. Calling it "salad cups" doesn't do it either since a miang like this isn't usually served assembled in little lettuce cups. Either way, this shrimp and pomelo salad served with chili jam is simple, balanced, and delicious. More

Beer-Steamed Mussels with Bacon

Aside from mussels, there are few other seafoods that so easily lend themselves to quick cooking, and even faster eating. After all, to manipulate a mound of mussels into a meal, a simple steam in broth or other flavorful liquid is all that is needed to pop the bivalves open. But fast doesn't have to be bland. In fact, I find the Belgian method of steaming mussels with a white ale (or any beer really) to be of the utmost flavor—especially when the whole mess is embellished with crunchy bacon. More

Shrimp Scampi with Artichokes

[Photograph: Blake Royer] Note: You can cook your own artichoke hearts or use frozen or canned artichoke hearts. Adapted from Epicurious. About the author: Blake Royer is a food writer, photographer, and filmmaker based in Chicago; he has been writing... More

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