'sauce' on Serious Eats

Buffalo Barbecue Sauce

Why relegate Buffalo sauce to chicken wings? Here, we've borrowed those flavors—namely, Frank's Red Hot Sauce and butter—and worked them into a slightly thicker ketchup base. A pinch of celery salt adds a subtle reminder of the carrot and celery sticks typically served with Buffalo wings, while a splash of cider vinegar helps keep the sauce more firmly in the tart zone where it belongs. Not totally unlike Lexington Dip, this is a slightly thinner, vinegary sauce that's meant as more of a topping than a glaze. More

Mushroom Ragù

This deeply flavorful sauce, made from both fresh and dry mushrooms, tomatoes, white wine, and aromatic vegetables, is so hearty, you won't believe it contains no meat. It's delicious on pasta or polenta. More

Foolproof Béarnaise Sauce

For my money, the very best classic steak sauce you can make at home, a sauce that will wow your guests with its flavor and elegance, and—most importantly—a sauce that can be made start to finish in under half an hour, is béarnaise. The catch (there's always a catch) is that made with the classic technique, it's very easy to mess up. Here is a foolproof technique that uses hot butter and a hand blender for perfect results every time. More

Ponzu-Ginger Dipping Sauce

This no-cook dipping sauce features ponzu, the citrus- and soy-spiked Japanese sauce, that's enlivened with ginger, scallions, and sesame oil. It's reminiscent of teriyaki, but substantially more complex. Try it with dumplings, simply cooked chicken, or steamed or roasted fish. More

Coconut Curry Dipping Sauce

South Asian flavors come together harmoniously in this easy dipping sauce, made by warming red curry paste with coconut milk, then rounding out and boosting their flavors with honey, soy sauce, fish sauce, ginger, and lime. It's perfect as a dip for dumplings, or with poached chicken. More

Black Bean Dipping Sauce With Maple Syrup

Chinese fermented black soy beans are eye-bulgingly salty and all kinds of funky. Here, its fermented tang is transformed into a delicious dipping sauce with the help of maple syrup, creamy peanut butter, and a little chili oil for some warm heat. It's perfect as a dip for dumplings, and is also delicious with roasted chicken and seared pork chops. More

Thai-Style Dipping Sauce

To make this amazing dipping sauce for dumplings, we start with the classic combination of Asian fish sauce, lime juice, and sugar, then punch it up with raw garlic, fresh cilantro, and hot chili flakes. The flavors blend seamlessly into a sauce that's versatile enough to dress a salad, marinate a steak, and, yes, coat your dumplings. More

Kimchi and Honey Dipping Sauce

If you've never heard of kimchi paste, you're not alone. It's a simple combination of red pepper flakes, garlic, ginger, sugar, lime juice, water, salt, and fish sauce, but the easiest way to get it is to buy it at Korean grocers and Asian specialty markets, where it's often labeled as "kimchi base." It's punchy and sharp, tangy, and incredibly invigorating. To turn it into a dip for dumplings, we temper it with honey, sesame seeds, and melted butter to create a smooth sauce that's intensely sweet, spicy, buttery, and just a little nutty all at once. More

Ragú Napoletano (Neapolitan-Style Italian Meat Sauce with Pork, Beef, and Sausage)

If you were to pick a president and el tigre numero uno of the ragù world, it'd be ragù Napoletano, a meaty stew with big chunks of beef, pork, and sausages simmered until fall-apart tender in a rich tomato sauce flavored with wine, onions, garlic, basil, and plenty of good Southern Italian olive oil. It's the precursor to Italian-American Sunday gravy: just add some meatballs, serve it with spaghetti, and you're there. It's also the perfect dish for a lazy Sunday with family or friends at home. More

Two-Minute Aioli

Classic aioli is made with nothing but garlic and olive oil pounded in a mortar and pestle. Our updated version uses egg yolks to help bind the sauce along with a hand blender to make it 100% foolproof and extremely quick. More

Tangerine and Fennel Vinaigrette

Most produce is a sad sight during the winter, except for citrus. We whipped up this tangerine vinaigrette to celebrate one of the few fruits that's best this time of year. It's delicious on salads, or as a sauce for roasted or grilled fish, pork, or chicken. More

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