'rye bread' on Serious Eats

Serious Rye Bread

I tend to make fluffy rye breads that are destined for sandwiches, but sometimes I really want a dense, chewy rye. This isn't sandwich bread; it's more a bread you'd slice thin with appetizers or toss in a bread basket. It's not a lightweight bread; it's more serious than that. More

Hint of Rye Bread

[Photograph: Donna Currie] If you don't have a clay baker, you can bake this loaf in a cast iron dutch oven. It won't release steam, but it will retain the moisture from the bread as it bakes. One thing to... More

Sauerkraut Rye

[Photograph: Donna Currie] What Worked: An incredibly tasty bread. What Didn't: A long list of ingredients might make some people think twice about making this. Pumpernickel flour might not be available at the grocery store. Suggested Tweaks: I love caraway,... More

Cocktail Rye Bread

[Photograph: Donna Currie] I used pumpernickel flour for this recipe, but I know that most stores don't stock a lot of different rye flours, so use whatever rye flour you have on hand, or whatever you can find. I'm usually... More

Bread Baking: Rye Chop Bread

It's embarrassing how many types of rye flour I usually have on hand. I love rye. Rye chops aren't a type of flour, though. Essentially they're roughly cut rye berries. They're chunky bits, sort of like the steel cut oats of the rye world. More

Bread Baking: Malted Barley Dark Rye Sandwich Loaf

For this loaf, I used a pale chocolate malt. The grains smelled a bit like chocolate with a hint of coffee. One of my previous loaves used a darker roasted malt called Pearl Black that smelled very much like roasted coffee and had a much stronger flavor in the finished loaf. If you don't have dark malted barley, you could simply leave it out and use this recipe to make a standard rye. It will be a lot paler, and not as complex, but still a nice loaf of rye. More

Bread Baking: Caraway (Stone-Ground) Rye

There are a lot of different rye flours available, including light rye, medium rye, and pumpernickel flour. However, my local grocery chains tend to have one brand and one type, and that's stone-ground rye. It's a coarser, grittier rye than most of the others that I buy online, but it still makes a nice bread. If your local markets have other varieties of rye flour, use what's available or what you like best. More

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