'pork belly' on Serious Eats

Taiwanese Pork Belly Buns (Gua Bao)

True Taiwanese pork belly buns have five defining components: the fluffy steamed bun, tender braised pork belly, pickled mustard greens, fresh cilantro, and powdered peanuts. All combined, it's a messy, colorful, glorious snack of salty, sweet, pungent, and fresh flavors, with multiple textures to boot. More

Nigel Slater's Crisp Pork Belly, Sweet Peach Salsa

Nigel Slater's Crisp pork belly, sweet peach salsa from Ripe is a fabulous surprise of a recipe. The warm, vaguely Asian spice blend rubbed into the belly may not seem an obvious complement to a Southwestern-style peach salsa, but a quick glance through the ingredients reveals commonalities: cilantro, lime, and chile all play their parts in both cuisines, and peaches themselves are one of America's favorite imports from China. Not to mention, that once the peach salsa is piled on top of thinly sliced, quiveringly rich belly, it's hard to imagine doubting Slater's genius. More

Twice-Cooked Pork

Twice-cooked pork is a Sichuan dish of fatty pork leg or belly that gets two very different cooking preparations. In the first stage, the belly is simmered just until it is cooked through. Then you stir-fry the slices of belly until the meat is brown, the fat has rendered somewhat, and the layer of skin is a little crispy around the edges. Finally, add to the wok what I think should be some kind of holy trinity of Chinese pastes: black bean, chili bean, and sweet bean. More

Cook the Book: Hangover Curing Pork Belly

Hearing about hangover cures from foreign lands never gets old, which is one of the reasons I decided to tackle this Hangover Curing Pork Belly from Home Made by Yvette van Boven. The other reason? Pork belly never gets old—for me at least. Van Boven describes how she serves this pork belly in her restaurant, sliced and presented on crusty bread with a side of potato salad and sinus-clearing horseradish-lemon sauce. Sounds like the kind of carby, fatty, spicy plate that can cure what ails you, right? More

Grilling: Smoked Pork Belly Marinated in Char Siu Sauce

This was, surprisingly, my first pork belly attempt but any anxiety was quickly dispelled when tasting the red-hued beauty that emerged after five hours in the smoker. The insides were moist, tender, and juicy—that's almost a given when so much fat is involved—and the outside had a great crust that held the slightly sweet and salty flavor of the char siu sauce. More

Dinner Tonight: Kimchi Jigae (Kimchi Stew)

Maybe it's the falling leaves, or just the slight chill in the air, but I was in need of something restorative and filling. During such times, my mind drifts towards the warming powers of kimchi, and of the Korean stew kimchi jigae. Even though I've written about a fine version of the recipe before, I was coerced into trying this recipe by Marc Matsumoto of the food blog No Recipes. "In the same way that every family has their own secret family recipe for kimchi," he writes, "the recipes for Kimchi Jigae vary widely by household." If the recipe differs so widely, why can't I write about another version? More

The Nasty Bits: How to Make Chicharrones

When I asked Kenji if he knew of any good recipes for chicharrones, he instantly thought of a technique he learned in Colombia. The method seemed too good to be true: place segments of pork belly in a wok with a bit of water, set it over the stove, and let the fat render out over the course of a few hours. Towards the end, turn up the heat, thereby using the fat in the wok to deep-fry the belly. More

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