'peas' on Serious Eats

Deborah Madison's Spring Garden Hodgepodge of Radishes, Leeks, and Peas Depending ...

You gotta love a cookbook author bold enough to use the words "hodgepodge" and "depending" in the same recipe title. Yet as Deborah Madison explains in her new book, Vegetable Literacy, "Depending is the operative word when there is a garden or good farmers' market." Indeed, when shopping seasonally, you'll never really know what'll look good until you see it. So, go ahead, embrace the hodgepodge of spring vegetables, and adapt Madison's gentle cooking technique and emphatic use of excellent butter to suit your spring haul. More

Deborah Madison's Peas with Baked Ricotta and Bread Crumbs

Shucking fresh peas is not a quick task, I'll admit. But if you can get your hands on some fresh peas in their pods at a farmers' market in the next couple of weeks, grab them and commit to an extra half hour of meal prep. Deborah Madison's unassuming Peas with Baked Ricotta from her new book Vegetable Literacy is worth it. The bright sweetness of the buttery peas matches perfectly with the creamy richness of fresh ricotta, and baking the ricotta with olive oil and fresh bread crumbs transforms cheese and peas into an actual meal. More

From a Polish Country House Kitchen's Pierogi with Potato, Cheese, Bacon, and Peas Filling

From soup-filled to soup-simmered, I have never met a dumpling I did not like. So it was with great excitement that I flipped open From A Polish Country House Kitchen to find not one, not two, but three different recipes for pierogi. Pierogi are boiled and then pan fried half-moon dumplings usually filled with some kind of meat, cheese, or potato filling. Pierogi are usually made en masse as a celebratory meal, since all of the kneading, rolling, filling, and boiling can take the better part of a day. Anne Applebaum and Danielle Crittenden's recipe, however, is scaled back to make just enough pierogi for 4 people, so the challenge is a little less formidable. Their classic "Ruskie" filling of potatoes, ricotta, bacon, and peas is a humble one, but it is nonetheless delightful. More

Vegetarian Mapo Tofu with Peas

"Pock-Marked Mother's Bean Curd," the translation of the name mapo tofu, gives a good indication of the homey, comforting nature of this dish, which tastes just like something Mom would make, if Mom were Chinese and an excellent cook. This vegetarian version omits the beef or pork, instead adding in some bright green peas. More

Mushy Peas

To many of us, the idea of serving any vegetable mushy conjures up images of sad canned string beans, and overcooked carrots. Mushy peas are miles away from both of those dishes—peas are cooked simply with butter, then mashed and seasoned with lemon, salt and pepper. More

Robb Walsh's Fresh Field Peas

Robb Walsh, author of Texas Eats keeps his Fresh Field Peas simple with a soul food inspired recipe that begins (as many good things do) with bacon. Onions are sweated in the bacon fat, and the peas are added and simmered with chicken broth, a few pods of okra as a thickener, and a lone chile for heat. Fresh peas don't need too much stove top, just simmer until tender and serve. More

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