'parmesan' on Serious Eats

Orecchiette with Caramelized Turnips, Tuscan Kale, and Cracked Pepper from 'The Vermont Farm Table Cookbook'

This pasta dish from Tracey Medeiros's Vermont Farm Table Cookbook introduced a new element to my standard kale recipe mix: caramelized turnips. At first, I was turned off by the idea of pairing bitter greens with a bitter root vegetable, but then I remembered how turnips mellow and sweeten once cooked. Add in some serious maillard action to the turnips, and I realized this was a really clever way to make use of a New England staple crop. More

Radish-Top Pasta from 'The French Market Cookbook'

I'm one of those people who buys root vegetables with the leaves intact with the intent to cook them up as kind of a "freebie." But most of the time I forget about the greens for a couple of days, and then by the time I get around to using them, they've all but shriveled up. Recipes like this super-quick radish-top pasta from Clotilde Dusoulier's new book, The French Market Cookbook, however, encourage me to change my ways. More

Fried Zucchini with Parmigiano-Reggiano and Lemon from 'Franny's'

Fried vegetables make up a substantial chapter in the new Franny's cookbook. Rather than serving a plethora of deep fried cheese sticks and onion rings dipped in tomato sauce, Andrew Feinberg and Francine Stephens take a lighter approach. The thin batter puffs and turns a light golden-brown, leaving the zucchini tender throughout, yet still bright green within. Freshly ground black pepper, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and a squeeze of lemon are all they need as a finishing touch. More

Bread Baking: Overnight Parmesan Rye

Letting a loaf of bread take an overnight rest in the refrigerator has a lot of advantages. For one thing, the flavor improves. For another, the gluten becomes active, so you don't need to knead as much. I think it's particularly useful with rye breads. Rye is tasty enough on its own but since it doesn't have as much gluten as wheat bread, letting it rest overnight is a much easier way to let the gluten develop. More

More Posts