'parmesan' on Serious Eats

Party-Sized Chicken Parmesan Sandwiches

To make the best chicken Parm sandwich, just start with the best chicken Parmesan. Our version uses a buttermilk brine for extra juiciness and flavor. We take the leftovers and pack them into a full-sized loaf of toasted ciabatta, adding some extra sauce and cheese to keep the bread moist before cutting it up into single serving slices. This is a chicken Parm sandwich so good it's almost worth making the chicken Parm fresh just for the sandwich. More

Orecchiette with Caramelized Turnips, Tuscan Kale, and Cracked Pepper from 'The Vermont Farm Table Cookbook'

This pasta dish from Tracey Medeiros's Vermont Farm Table Cookbook introduced a new element to my standard kale recipe mix: caramelized turnips. At first, I was turned off by the idea of pairing bitter greens with a bitter root vegetable, but then I remembered how turnips mellow and sweeten once cooked. Add in some serious maillard action to the turnips, and I realized this was a really clever way to make use of a New England staple crop. More

Radish-Top Pasta from 'The French Market Cookbook'

I'm one of those people who buys root vegetables with the leaves intact with the intent to cook them up as kind of a "freebie." But most of the time I forget about the greens for a couple of days, and then by the time I get around to using them, they've all but shriveled up. Recipes like this super-quick radish-top pasta from Clotilde Dusoulier's new book, The French Market Cookbook, however, encourage me to change my ways. More

Fried Zucchini with Parmigiano-Reggiano and Lemon from 'Franny's'

Fried vegetables make up a substantial chapter in the new Franny's cookbook. Rather than serving a plethora of deep fried cheese sticks and onion rings dipped in tomato sauce, Andrew Feinberg and Francine Stephens take a lighter approach. The thin batter puffs and turns a light golden-brown, leaving the zucchini tender throughout, yet still bright green within. Freshly ground black pepper, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and a squeeze of lemon are all they need as a finishing touch. More

Bread Baking: Overnight Parmesan Rye

Letting a loaf of bread take an overnight rest in the refrigerator has a lot of advantages. For one thing, the flavor improves. For another, the gluten becomes active, so you don't need to knead as much. I think it's particularly useful with rye breads. Rye is tasty enough on its own but since it doesn't have as much gluten as wheat bread, letting it rest overnight is a much easier way to let the gluten develop. More

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