'milk' on Serious Eats

Pepper Gravy

Pepper gravy—essentially a heavily peppered bechamel that subs bacon grease for butter—is a simple base that serves as a building block to a whole host of other Southern gravies. More

DIY Rice Milk

While similar to the commercial options, this DIY recipe is not an exact replica of what's on grocery store shelves. If you're looking for a cost-saving option that you are free to flavor to suit your own preferences, however, this is a great way to go. More

Pork Braised in Milk and Cream

When searching in my kitchen for things to toss into my braising dish, milk and cream are not the first to jump out. But after a few conversations with a dear friend I was inspired to look into recipes for pork braised in milk and cream. The final product is moist and tender, and the milk and cream create a thick, curdled, porky sauce that is unlike anything I have ever tasted before. More

Chocolate Milk from Scratch

This isn't so much a recipe as a guideline; start here and adjust to your personal taste. You can use whatever kind of milk is your favorite; I prefer 2%. Any sweetener is acceptable: honey, sugar, agave syrup, even maple syrup can work. Just remember that each has a different sweetness level. More

Homemade Soy Milk

This fresh, clean homemade soy milk is delicious on its own. But you can add vanilla, almond extract, honey, or sugar. The nice thing is you get to control how much goes in, unlike the sweetened store-bought versions, which also happen to be quite a bit more expensive. More

Cardamom Lee's Cake

This is an icebox cake introduced to me by Lee Holtzman, a friend and food writer. It's an heirloom recipe of the Holztman family, one I've never heard of before or since, so I've adopted the name her family gave it. It's an icebox cake, a Northern European tiramisu: dry-ish cookies soaked in spirit-laden liquid, layered with whipped cream and chilled until the layers meld into a mellow, puffy cloud. More

How to Make Whole-Milk Ricotta Cheese

Ricotta is one of the easier cheeses to make at home—it's especially tasty when fresh from the cheesecloth. The single step that makes cheese is adding acid to the milk, be it from lemon juice, vinegar, or buttermilk, in varying proportions. For this recipe you will need a big ol' pot, a non-reactive stirring spoon, a colander lined with cheesecloth, paper towels, butter muslin, or a very clean flour sack dish towel, and a reliable thermometer. It's pretty simple, and you get to call yourself a cheesemaker after. More

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