'lillet' on Serious Eats

Up in Arms

Carlos Yturria at Cafe Claude Marina in San Francisco whips up this cocktail to remind you of a stroll along the Seine. Fresh lemon adds focus to the fruity, rich Lillet, while Bonal, a bitter aperitif wine, brings it all into balance. More

Kentucky Corpse Reviver from Peels

Perhaps you've had a Corpse Reviver #2, which brings together gin and curaçao, Lillet blanc, and lemon, with a dash of absinthe. Here's a variation from Peels restaurant in NYC that uses bourbon instead of gin, and it's delicious. Pierre Ferrand's dry curaçao is great here, but you could substitute Cointreau if you have it on hand. More

Schrodinger's Cat

Schrodinger's Cat was a thought-experiment postulating a simultaneous state of existence of non-existence. For some reason, this led me to pair Mezcal and Bourbon. Remember, a cocktail is both perfect and undrinkable—until you actually taste it. More

Lillet of the Valley

Lillet of the Valley is a variation of the Col du Sabion, a drink we first encountered at the Manhattan Cocktail Classic. The lightness of cider combined with the tart and earthy citrus flavors make this drink an excellent companion while watching the sunset from your rooftop. More

Time for a Drink: the Weeski

With an approachable yet distinctive flavor, Irish whiskey isn't called for in a great many cocktails, but there are a few drinks that are handy to have in your repertoire when the Powers comes out to play. Here's a contemporary cocktail that features Irish whiskey to good effect: the Weeski. More

Time for a Drink: the Vesper

Introduced to the world in 1953 in Casino Royale—the first book in what became Ian Fleming's sprawling James Bond franchise—the Vesper has had more popularity in print and in film than it's ever had inside a glass. Which is too bad, actually, considering it's actually a pretty decent drink. More

Time for a Drink: Corpse Reviver #2

Enter the Corpse Reviver #2. Part of a class of "corpse reviver" cocktails—so named because of their purported ability to bring the dead (or at least painfully hungover) back to some semblance of life—this drink was a staple of bar manuals back in the 1930s, only to fall off the map in the last half of the 20th century. More

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