'homebrewing' on Serious Eats

Single-Malt, Single-Hop IPA (For Beginning Homebrewers)

For this SMaSH (Single Malt and Single Hop) beer, I chose Mosaic hops, the daughter of American IPA hop stalwart Simcoe. Mosaic hops only became commercially available following the fall 2012 harvest, but they're already picking up steam among home and craft brewers for creating an array of flavors and aromas that have been said to include cedar, stone fruit, tropical fruit, blueberry, and floral notes. To round things out, I paired the Mosaic hops with the sweet, clean Golden Promise pale malt. More

Ginger Beer

Ginger beer is ginger ale's sinister cousin: much or ginger and a little less sweet, but still (mostly) non-alcoholic. It can be made easily at home with simple ingredients and materials. More

Russian Imperial Stout (For Advanced Brewers)

This is an all-grain recipe designed for advanced homebrewers. If your mash tun is not large enough to hold all 21 pounds of grain, you can substitute light dry malt extract for a portion of the 2-row malt. Use a ratio of 0.65 pounds of dry extract for each pound of malt removed. The malt extract should be added after the sparge as the wort is heating to a boil. More

Saison

Saison is a light-colored, light-bodied, dry, fruity, and effervescent ale. It originates from the Wallonia region of Belgium, where French is spoken. Traditionally, it was brewed in the spring for consumption over the summer, but I like it as a late winter ale because of its higher alcohol content and spiciness. More

Winter Warmer

Winter Warmer ales are like gingerbread and cognac wrapped up in a beer. Start with a good-tasting beer foundation, add some spice on top, and finish with some alcoholic warmth. This recipe clocks in at around 8.7% ABV. More

Pilsner (For Intermediate Homebrewers)

This is an all-grain homebrewing recipe which is written for the intermediate level, brew-in-a-bag homebrewer. Since this beer is a lager style, it's highly recommended that you have a temperature controlled refrigerator you can use for cold fermentation and lagering. If this is your first lager, read this lager overview before you begin to make sure you know the process. More

Belgian Tripel (For Beginning Homebrewers)

This pale, strong beer of is recognized by its fruit and spice aromas and sweet malt flavor that seems to quickly dissipate from the tongue. The simplicity of the base recipe makes this an excellent style for the beginning homebrewer, but it will also push the limits for the advanced homebrewer trying to capture that perfect Belgian yeast character. More

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