'holiday recipes' on Serious Eats

Cook the Book: Cheese Ball with Cumin, Mint, and Pistachios

According to author and recipe tester extraordinaire Amanda Hesser, this cheese ball was introduced in 2003, when the classic appetizer had moved out of the mainstream and into the world of the deliciously ironic. Cream cheese and goat cheese are whipped together with a whole slew of bright, thrilling flavors: lemon zest, cumin, coriander, fresh mint, and thinly sliced celery hearts. More

Roasted Pumpkin Soup

Far be it from me to argue with a curried pumpkin soup, or a pumpkin soup with pancetta, or a pumpkin soup with dancing croutons. I love those guys, I really do. What they aren't, though—what they'll never be—is the good old classic pumpkin soup that got us all hooked on pumpkin soup in the first place. Nope, they aren't The One. But this is. More

Biscochitos

Biscochitos are a traditional New Mexican holiday cookie; a subtly porky confection made from lard, with anise seeds and brandy or rum. In December, biscochitos comprise maybe thirty percent of the diet of the average New Mexican. It is considered bad form to go to a social gathering or leave one without having brought your own batch and sampled that of your friends and coworkers. More

Flaming Holiday Punch

I've been mixing variations of a Flaming Holiday Punch (known in some circles as "English Bishop") every December for years now. The base recipe is from Esquire's Handbook for Hosts, from 1949, which is nice on its own but quite open to improvisation. The ingredients are a cinch: a bottle of aged rum poured into a punch bowl over baked oranges studded with cloves. Toss in a little sugar and some holiday spice, turn down the lights before you apply a match to the hot liquid (careful!) and conversation is pretty much guaranteed to stop. More

Brisket with Ginger, Orange Peel, and Tomato

The lemon and orange zest permeates the meat with bright citrus, the cider vinegar and white wine add a slightly sour note, and the ginger lends the tiniest kick. And like any brisket recipe worth its salt, it comes out of the oven exactly two and a half hours later fork-tender, ready to be sliced, sauced, and served with the sweet carrots that have been cooking in the braising liquid. More

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